Related to "undergone significant changes"

Firstly, please allow us to wish you a very Happy and Healthy New Year and one which is hopefully substantially better than 2020 for most of us.

Since March last year, the world has been struggling to adjust to the new normal created by the pandemic and had to quickly adjust to a fluid and highly volatile environment. Managing talent during this time has probably been one of the key challenges faced by organisations. Having spoken to and working with clients across the world, we thought it might be interesting to share some of our learnings from these experiences.

Seeking opportunities in adversity
Like many organisations, in March 2020 we had to quickly get our team ready to Work from Home in case India went into lockdown. What was initially a temporary measure, now looks to be permanent, and we are now operating as if this new way of working will be our new normal.

Whilst this has created challenges, it has also opened up new opportunities (in our case, we can now look for talent far and wide, instead of being restricted to where our office was). Many of our clients have also taken this opportunity to cast their nets wider when looking for talent.

Be flexible and nimble
Despite the various lockdowns all over the world, we were fortunate enough to avoid most of the restrictions by travelling to and working from locations where lockdowns were lighter or had been removed. However, at times we risked getting stuck due to rapid changes in travel restrictions. This was a problem for many clients and candidates, especially when taking overseas placements.

It is therefore important to be able to find innovative ways to get around or past some of these hurdles – clients that were able to do this managed to get their resources where they needed them and thrive despite a terrible economic environment.

Discipline
Throughout this period, we maintained a regular work schedule, regardless of where we were working from. Team calls were held daily and timings adjusted to suit our location. Clients were responded to in a timely fashion. Candidates were spoken to at times convenient to them.

By insisting that our standards did not drop, we were able to ensure that the team remained engaged and continued to perform despite the challenges of working remotely. However, perhaps more importantly, we were also disciplined in taking a break. Realising that this was a marathon and not a sprint meant that we made a conscious effort to switch off regularly and avoid working nonstop.

The past year has provided us with many challenges and opportunities and we have tried to address these in the best possible way. No doubt, we have made some mistakes and probably could have done things better!

It would be great to hear about your experiences and learnings, especially when it comes to talent acquisition and management so please feel free to reach out to us with your comments or queries.

Description:

Firstly, please allow us to wish you a very Happy and Healthy New Year and one which is hopefully substantially better than 2020 for most of us.

Since March last year, the world has been struggling to adjust to the new normal created by the pandemic and had to quickly adjust to a fluid and highly volatile environment. Managing talent during this time has probably been one of the key challenges faced by organisations. Having spoken to and working with clients across the world, we thought it might be interesting to share some of our learnings from these experiences.

Seeking opportunities in adversity
Like many organisations, in March 2020 we had to quickly get our team ready to Work from Home in case India went into lockdown. What was initially a temporary measure, now looks to be permanent, and we are now operating as if this new way of working will be our new normal.

Whilst this has created challenges, it has also opened up new opportunities (in our case, we can now look for talent far and wide, instead of being restricted to where our office was). Many of our clients have also taken this opportunity to cast their nets wider when looking for talent.

Be flexible and nimble
Despite the various lockdowns all over the world, we were fortunate enough to avoid most of the restrictions by travelling to and working from locations where lockdowns were lighter or had been removed. However, at times we risked getting stuck due to rapid changes in travel restrictions. This was a problem for many clients and candidates, especially when taking overseas placements.

It is therefore important to be able to find innovative ways to get around or past some of these hurdles – clients that were able to do this managed to get their resources where they needed them and thrive despite a terrible economic environment.

Discipline
Throughout this period, we maintained a regular work schedule, regardless of where we were working from. Team calls were held daily and timings adjusted to suit our location. Clients were responded to in a timely fashion. Candidates were spoken to at times convenient to them.

By insisting that our standards did not drop, we were able to ensure that the team remained engaged and continued to perform despite the challenges of working remotely. However, perhaps more importantly, we were also disciplined in taking a break. Realising that this was a marathon and not a sprint meant that we made a conscious effort to switch off regularly and avoid working nonstop.

The past year has provided us with many challenges and opportunities and we have tried to address these in the best possible way. No doubt, we have made some mistakes and probably could have done things better!

It would be great to hear about your experiences and learnings, especially when it comes to talent acquisition and management so please feel free to reach out to us with your comments or queries.

Related Keyphrases:

new opportunities | volatile environment | talent acquisition | many organisations | regular work schedule | many challenges | terrible economic | times convenient | key challenges | various lockdowns | temporary measure | many clients | March last year | conscious effort | Healthy New Year

Jyoti Hinduja, talks about how the recruitment industry has changed with the advent of better communication and technology.


I have been working in the recruitment industry for 18 years and I have seen many changes and an evolution in how recruiters work. With an improvement in technology, the use of job portals and social media, we are able to quickly advertise positions, compared to when I started my career and we used to advertise in newspapers.

Communication methods have also improved and until about 10 years ago we were using landlines and fax machines to communicate with clients and candidates, we also used to have candidates walk-in to our offices to submit their resume.

With the use of technology, my job has become significantly more efficient and the industry is able to source and screen candidates much faster, leading to cost savings for our clients and efficiencies in our teams.

With the use of whatsapp, skype and other communication tools, we are able to provide timely feedback to both candidates and clients, which has improved our relationships.

I have been doing international recruitment throughout my career, and one of the key challenges is to educate candidates on different countries that they may potentially be applying for jobs to. Now, we can direct them to websites, forums, videos of the country, the supermarkets and the Indian restaurants!

My career has been challenging and I have adapted throughout the changes in technology and communication, and I feel this has led to my success. I expect the industry to keep changing, and for our team at Select Global Solutions to be at the forefront of international recruitment.


I have been working with Nikunj Shah both at Datum Recruitment Services and at Select Global Solutions for the last 10 years, and we have worked across several continents and countries, serving over 400 clients globally! Every day is different in my career, and I love the challenges of a career in recruitment!

Description:

Jyoti Hinduja, talks about how the recruitment industry has changed with the advent of better communication and technology.


I have been working in the recruitment industry for 18 years and I have seen many changes and an evolution in how recruiters work. With an improvement in technology, the use of job portals and social media, we are able to quickly advertise positions, compared to when I started my career and we used to advertise in newspapers.

Communication methods have also improved and until about 10 years ago we were using landlines and fax machines to communicate with clients and candidates, we also used to have candidates walk-in to our offices to submit their resume.

With the use of technology, my job has become significantly more efficient and the industry is able to source and screen candidates much faster, leading to cost savings for our clients and efficiencies in our teams.

With the use of whatsapp, skype and other communication tools, we are able to provide timely feedback to both candidates and clients, which has improved our relationships.

I have been doing international recruitment throughout my career, and one of the key challenges is to educate candidates on different countries that they may potentially be applying for jobs to. Now, we can direct them to websites, forums, videos of the country, the supermarkets and the Indian restaurants!

My career has been challenging and I have adapted throughout the changes in technology and communication, and I feel this has led to my success. I expect the industry to keep changing, and for our team at Select Global Solutions to be at the forefront of international recruitment.


I have been working with Nikunj Shah both at Datum Recruitment Services and at Select Global Solutions for the last 10 years, and we have worked across several continents and countries, serving over 400 clients globally! Every day is different in my career, and I love the challenges of a career in recruitment!

Related Keyphrases:

international recruitment | recruitment industry | Select Global Solutions | communication tools | screen candidates | different countries | advertise positions | several continents | Indian restaurants | Datum Recruitment | last 10 years | key challenges | 400 clients | technology | many changes

Air Transport Bubbles between India and other Countries


India has created air bubbles with USA, UK, UAE, Germany and France. In addition to Indian carriers, the carriers from these countries are now permitted to operate services between India and their respective countries under the air transport bubble arrangement.


A) Inbound Flights to India: - Both Indian and foreign airlines while operating inbound flights into      India can carry:

  • Indians and USA/German/France Carriers- Stranded Indian nationals, All Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) cardholders holding US passports and Foreigners (including diplomats), who are eligible to enter India as per Ministry of Home Affairs guidelines.
  • UK Carriers- Stranded Indian nationals, All Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) cardholders holding UK passports and Foreigners (including diplomats), who are eligible to enter India as per Ministry of Home Affairs guidelines.
  • UAE Carriers- UAE nationals, ICA approved UAE residents destined for UAE only, Any Indian national holding any type of valid UAE visa and destined for UAE only. It would be for the airlines concerned to ensure that there is no travel restriction for Indian nationals to enter UAE with the particular visa category before issue of ticket/ boarding pass to the Indian passenger.

B) Outbound flights from India: 


  • USA/Germany/France Carriers- Any Indian national holding any type of valid US visa. It would be for the airlines concerned to ensure that there is no travel restriction for Indian nationals to enter USA with the particular visa category before issue of ticket/ boarding pass to the Indian passenger, US citizens, legal permanent residents, and foreign nationals holding valid US visas, Seamen of foreign nationalities, Seamen holding Indian passports would be allowed subject to clearance from the Ministry of Shipping and Stranded EU nationals/residents, foreign nationals destined for Europe and transiting through France or Germany (as applicable) or spouses of these persons, whether accompanying or otherwise.
  • UK Carriers- Any Indian national holding any type of valid UK visa and destined for UK only, Stranded UK nationals/residents, foreign nationals transiting through UK or spouses of these persons, whether accompanying or otherwise and Seamen of foreign nationalities.
  • UAE Carriers- Stranded Indian nationals, All Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) cardholders holding UAE passports, and UAE nationals (including diplomats) holding valid visa issued by an Indian Mission in any category covered under Ministry of Home Affairs.


Flight updates and quarantine measures in African Countries:


NIGERIA:

Nigerian officials have announced that a flight suspension in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is to be extended until September 5. The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) stated that the suspension, which was expected to be lifted on Saturday, August 29, was extended to allow for further preparation for the reopening of airports to international flights. Upon reopening, passengers arriving in Nigeria on international flights will be required to provide a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test and will have to fill in an online health questionnaire to present to authorities once they have landed. Arrivals from certain countries will be prohibited, with further information expected in coming days. Domestic flights previously resumed on July 8.


Quarantine measures: Whereas previous protocol required persons arriving in Nigeria to quarantine for 14 days at a government-selected hotel, the new protocol stipulates persons arriving in Nigeria must self-isolate for 14 days at a location of their choosing in the City/State of their point of entry (i.e. Lagos or Abuja).


KENYA:

On Saturday, August 1, national air carrier Kenya Airways announced that it will resume international commercial flights with immediate effect, following its suspension amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The first international flights will be to London, Dubai, Addis Ababa, Kigali, Dar es Salaam, and Lusaka. Domestic flights were resumed on July 15. The airline’s planned service resumption in August 2020 also includes following cities, according to its update. However, reservation is not available at time this post goes to press: Lubumbashi, Bangui, Kinshasa, Mahe Island, Entebbe, Lagos, Ndola, Mauritius.


Quarantine measuresPassengers entering Kenya are required to present a negative COVID-19 test result. The test result is valid for entry if produced no more than seven days before deplaning in Kenya. There is no mandatory quarantine for arriving passengers unless they are symptomatic.


SENEGAL:

While international flights resumed on July 15, this was mainly a measure for Senegalese nationals and residents stranded abroad to return to the country, as well as foreign nationals stranded in the country to leave. Land and sea borders remain closed.


Quarantine measures: All travelers to Senegal over the age of two years must present an original COVID-19 test certificate showing a negative result.  The test must occur within seven days of entry into Senegal and be issued by a laboratory approved for such testing or a recognized international health organization.  Travelers transiting Senegal must also show such proof if they will be present in Senegal more than 24 hours or wish to exit the airport.


ETHIOPIA:

Due to the coronavirus outbreak, Ethiopia has joined the list of countries that have introduced travel restrictions that affect who can enter the region. The temporary entry restrictions are intended to help contain the virus and stop it from spreading.


Quarantine measures: International travelers arriving in Ethiopia must have a medical certificate proving that they tested negative for COVID-19 with a RT-PCR test within 5 days before flying. A rapid diagnostic test (RDT antibody test) will not be accepted for this purpose. It is then necessary to self-isolate at the traveler’s home or accommodation for 14 days. Passengers who arrive without the medical certificate will be tested on arrival and quarantined at a designated hotel, such as the Ethiopian Skylight Hotel, or a special quarantine center for 7 days. This is paid for at their own expense. After the first week, they will be retested and permitted to self-isolate at home for the remaining 7 days.


GHANA:

President Nana Akufo-Addo announced on Sunday, August 30, that air borders will reopen to international travel as of Tuesday, September 1, following their closure due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Accra Kotoka International Airport (ACC) will also reopen to passenger air traffic on Tuesday, following the implementation of rapid COVID-19 testing for arrivals there. Land and sea borders remain closed until further notice.


Quarantine measures:  Those arriving in Ghana will be required to produce a negative COVID-19 test result acquired no more than 72 hours prior to scheduled arrival. Arrivals will also have to undergo a mandatory COVID-19 test, which involves a fee to be paid by the passenger.


TANZANIA:

Tanzanian aviation authorities on Thursday banned three Kenyan airlines from flying into the country in retaliation for Kenya subjecting passengers from Tanzania to a mandatory 14-day COVID-19 quarantine. Hamza Johari, head of the Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority, said in a statement that Air Kenya Express, Fly540, and Safari Link Aviation will not be allowed to enter Tanzania’s airspace unless Kenya changes its policy and gives passengers from Tanzania better treatment.

Quarantine measures: The government of Tanzania has removed mandatory 14-day quarantine requirements for visitors on arrival, as well as the requirement for a negative COVID-19 test. Tanzania is implementing temperature screening for passengers on arrival. If you show symptoms of COVID-19 on arrival, you may undergo enhanced screening and be required to take a Covid test, followed by a possible 14-day self-isolation. 


RWANDA

International commercial flights from Kigali International Airport (KGL) resumed on August 1 amid the easing of COVID-19-related restrictions.


Quarantine measures: All travelers entering the country are required to provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result from within 120 hours prior to their departure to the country. Travelers will also be required to enter into temporary quarantine at a government-designated hotel and take a second COVID-19 test within 24 hours of arrival, with onward travel within the country being authorized after confirmation of a negative test result. COVID-19 screening will also be in place for those leaving the country, with travelers displaying symptoms being prevented from boarding their flight and quarantined at an isolation facility until they can take a COVID-19 test.


DRC

Authorities announced on Thursday, August 20, the reopening of the country's air borders from Monday, August 24, following their closure due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Land, river, and sea borders remain closed with the exception of freight transport until further notice.


Quarantine measures: All travelers entering the Republic of Congo will be placed into 14 day quarantine at a government run facility


MOZAMBIQUE

Mozambique's interior ministry announced that the ban on foreign travel put in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) will be lifted as of Friday, August 21. Mozambicans can now leave and enter the country without needing to gain authorization from the interior minister. Foreigners can also leave and enter the country, so long as they have a valid work visa, valid residence permit, visa, or ID. Separately, Mozambique's national airline, Linhas Aereas de Mocambique, announced that it will resume flights to and from the Portuguese capital Lisbon from Tuesday, August 25.


Quarantine measures: The Mozambican Government has mandated a 10-day self-quarantine for all arrivals, regardless of citizenship or prior travel followed by a negative PRC-based COVID-19 test. Alternately, travellers may self-quarantine for a 14-day period without completing an additional COVID-19 test.


ANGOLA

The Angolan government has instituted mandatory quarantine for anyone entering the country, regardless of citizenship. The Government of Angola has set up multiple quarantine sites throughout the country, including two quarantine sites just outside of the capital city of Luanda.  Upon arrival in Luanda, travelers may choose between staying at one of several government-approved hotel quarantine locations (at personal expense) or a government-run quarantine center.


Quarantine measures: The Angolan government has instituted mandatory quarantine for anyone entering the country, regardless of citizenship. Angolan citizens and foreign residents who tested negative prior to boarding their flight may be permitted to quarantine in their homes.


Description:

Air Transport Bubbles between India and other Countries


India has created air bubbles with USA, UK, UAE, Germany and France. In addition to Indian carriers, the carriers from these countries are now permitted to operate services between India and their respective countries under the air transport bubble arrangement.


A) Inbound Flights to India: - Both Indian and foreign airlines while operating inbound flights into      India can carry:

  • Indians and USA/German/France Carriers- Stranded Indian nationals, All Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) cardholders holding US passports and Foreigners (including diplomats), who are eligible to enter India as per Ministry of Home Affairs guidelines.
  • UK Carriers- Stranded Indian nationals, All Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) cardholders holding UK passports and Foreigners (including diplomats), who are eligible to enter India as per Ministry of Home Affairs guidelines.
  • UAE Carriers- UAE nationals, ICA approved UAE residents destined for UAE only, Any Indian national holding any type of valid UAE visa and destined for UAE only. It would be for the airlines concerned to ensure that there is no travel restriction for Indian nationals to enter UAE with the particular visa category before issue of ticket/ boarding pass to the Indian passenger.

B) Outbound flights from India: 


  • USA/Germany/France Carriers- Any Indian national holding any type of valid US visa. It would be for the airlines concerned to ensure that there is no travel restriction for Indian nationals to enter USA with the particular visa category before issue of ticket/ boarding pass to the Indian passenger, US citizens, legal permanent residents, and foreign nationals holding valid US visas, Seamen of foreign nationalities, Seamen holding Indian passports would be allowed subject to clearance from the Ministry of Shipping and Stranded EU nationals/residents, foreign nationals destined for Europe and transiting through France or Germany (as applicable) or spouses of these persons, whether accompanying or otherwise.
  • UK Carriers- Any Indian national holding any type of valid UK visa and destined for UK only, Stranded UK nationals/residents, foreign nationals transiting through UK or spouses of these persons, whether accompanying or otherwise and Seamen of foreign nationalities.
  • UAE Carriers- Stranded Indian nationals, All Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) cardholders holding UAE passports, and UAE nationals (including diplomats) holding valid visa issued by an Indian Mission in any category covered under Ministry of Home Affairs.


Flight updates and quarantine measures in African Countries:


NIGERIA:

Nigerian officials have announced that a flight suspension in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is to be extended until September 5. The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) stated that the suspension, which was expected to be lifted on Saturday, August 29, was extended to allow for further preparation for the reopening of airports to international flights. Upon reopening, passengers arriving in Nigeria on international flights will be required to provide a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test and will have to fill in an online health questionnaire to present to authorities once they have landed. Arrivals from certain countries will be prohibited, with further information expected in coming days. Domestic flights previously resumed on July 8.


Quarantine measures: Whereas previous protocol required persons arriving in Nigeria to quarantine for 14 days at a government-selected hotel, the new protocol stipulates persons arriving in Nigeria must self-isolate for 14 days at a location of their choosing in the City/State of their point of entry (i.e. Lagos or Abuja).


KENYA:

On Saturday, August 1, national air carrier Kenya Airways announced that it will resume international commercial flights with immediate effect, following its suspension amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The first international flights will be to London, Dubai, Addis Ababa, Kigali, Dar es Salaam, and Lusaka. Domestic flights were resumed on July 15. The airline’s planned service resumption in August 2020 also includes following cities, according to its update. However, reservation is not available at time this post goes to press: Lubumbashi, Bangui, Kinshasa, Mahe Island, Entebbe, Lagos, Ndola, Mauritius.


Quarantine measuresPassengers entering Kenya are required to present a negative COVID-19 test result. The test result is valid for entry if produced no more than seven days before deplaning in Kenya. There is no mandatory quarantine for arriving passengers unless they are symptomatic.


SENEGAL:

While international flights resumed on July 15, this was mainly a measure for Senegalese nationals and residents stranded abroad to return to the country, as well as foreign nationals stranded in the country to leave. Land and sea borders remain closed.


Quarantine measures: All travelers to Senegal over the age of two years must present an original COVID-19 test certificate showing a negative result.  The test must occur within seven days of entry into Senegal and be issued by a laboratory approved for such testing or a recognized international health organization.  Travelers transiting Senegal must also show such proof if they will be present in Senegal more than 24 hours or wish to exit the airport.


ETHIOPIA:

Due to the coronavirus outbreak, Ethiopia has joined the list of countries that have introduced travel restrictions that affect who can enter the region. The temporary entry restrictions are intended to help contain the virus and stop it from spreading.


Quarantine measures: International travelers arriving in Ethiopia must have a medical certificate proving that they tested negative for COVID-19 with a RT-PCR test within 5 days before flying. A rapid diagnostic test (RDT antibody test) will not be accepted for this purpose. It is then necessary to self-isolate at the traveler’s home or accommodation for 14 days. Passengers who arrive without the medical certificate will be tested on arrival and quarantined at a designated hotel, such as the Ethiopian Skylight Hotel, or a special quarantine center for 7 days. This is paid for at their own expense. After the first week, they will be retested and permitted to self-isolate at home for the remaining 7 days.


GHANA:

President Nana Akufo-Addo announced on Sunday, August 30, that air borders will reopen to international travel as of Tuesday, September 1, following their closure due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Accra Kotoka International Airport (ACC) will also reopen to passenger air traffic on Tuesday, following the implementation of rapid COVID-19 testing for arrivals there. Land and sea borders remain closed until further notice.


Quarantine measures:  Those arriving in Ghana will be required to produce a negative COVID-19 test result acquired no more than 72 hours prior to scheduled arrival. Arrivals will also have to undergo a mandatory COVID-19 test, which involves a fee to be paid by the passenger.


TANZANIA:

Tanzanian aviation authorities on Thursday banned three Kenyan airlines from flying into the country in retaliation for Kenya subjecting passengers from Tanzania to a mandatory 14-day COVID-19 quarantine. Hamza Johari, head of the Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority, said in a statement that Air Kenya Express, Fly540, and Safari Link Aviation will not be allowed to enter Tanzania’s airspace unless Kenya changes its policy and gives passengers from Tanzania better treatment.

Quarantine measures: The government of Tanzania has removed mandatory 14-day quarantine requirements for visitors on arrival, as well as the requirement for a negative COVID-19 test. Tanzania is implementing temperature screening for passengers on arrival. If you show symptoms of COVID-19 on arrival, you may undergo enhanced screening and be required to take a Covid test, followed by a possible 14-day self-isolation. 


RWANDA

International commercial flights from Kigali International Airport (KGL) resumed on August 1 amid the easing of COVID-19-related restrictions.


Quarantine measures: All travelers entering the country are required to provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result from within 120 hours prior to their departure to the country. Travelers will also be required to enter into temporary quarantine at a government-designated hotel and take a second COVID-19 test within 24 hours of arrival, with onward travel within the country being authorized after confirmation of a negative test result. COVID-19 screening will also be in place for those leaving the country, with travelers displaying symptoms being prevented from boarding their flight and quarantined at an isolation facility until they can take a COVID-19 test.


DRC

Authorities announced on Thursday, August 20, the reopening of the country's air borders from Monday, August 24, following their closure due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Land, river, and sea borders remain closed with the exception of freight transport until further notice.


Quarantine measures: All travelers entering the Republic of Congo will be placed into 14 day quarantine at a government run facility


MOZAMBIQUE

Mozambique's interior ministry announced that the ban on foreign travel put in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) will be lifted as of Friday, August 21. Mozambicans can now leave and enter the country without needing to gain authorization from the interior minister. Foreigners can also leave and enter the country, so long as they have a valid work visa, valid residence permit, visa, or ID. Separately, Mozambique's national airline, Linhas Aereas de Mocambique, announced that it will resume flights to and from the Portuguese capital Lisbon from Tuesday, August 25.


Quarantine measures: The Mozambican Government has mandated a 10-day self-quarantine for all arrivals, regardless of citizenship or prior travel followed by a negative PRC-based COVID-19 test. Alternately, travellers may self-quarantine for a 14-day period without completing an additional COVID-19 test.


ANGOLA

The Angolan government has instituted mandatory quarantine for anyone entering the country, regardless of citizenship. The Government of Angola has set up multiple quarantine sites throughout the country, including two quarantine sites just outside of the capital city of Luanda.  Upon arrival in Luanda, travelers may choose between staying at one of several government-approved hotel quarantine locations (at personal expense) or a government-run quarantine center.


Quarantine measures: The Angolan government has instituted mandatory quarantine for anyone entering the country, regardless of citizenship. Angolan citizens and foreign residents who tested negative prior to boarding their flight may be permitted to quarantine in their homes.


Related Keyphrases:

Stranded Indian nationals | negative test result | international commercial flights | negative coronavirus disease | national air carrier Kenya Airways | quarantine measures | 14 day quarantine | first international flights | hotel quarantine locations | Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority | ICA approved UAE residents | special quarantine center | multiple quarantine sites | mandatory quarantine | international health organization

Following the turmoil this year, we have been speaking to our clients and candidates across the world to try and make sense of what is happening and what may come next for hiring and managing talent.

Some common themes that have already been reported:

  1. Work From Home (WFH) is here to stay, though perhaps not at 100%
  2. Most companies have imposed hiring freezes and/or are going through painful downsizing or paycuts
  3. There are multiple applicants for most jobs and many of the candidates are vastly overqualified for these roles
  4. Graduates are in a really tough bind at the moment

And so on….

We also found some other trends that are less obvious and sometimes counterintuitive. Here we share some of the more surprising trends that we have been encountering;

Talent - It is getting harder to hire (yes, really!)
Given the earlier comments about multiple applicants for any job being posted, this statement seems a little daft. In reality, what we saw is that many good candidates are not willing to switch jobs at this time. Even those who had been forced to take a pay cut, were willing to stick it out with their current organisation.

Very few employees working with larger organisations and respected brands were willing to consider a change, despite being offered higher salaries. Those who had recently been let go were still wary of taking on a job with lesser known companies and preferred organisations perceived to be more stable.

Trepidation - Employees are worried about WFH
Many articles have predicted how organisations will be forced to allow employees much greater flexibility and freedom in working from home. In reality, many employees want to get back to the office. Apart from the obvious reasons (children, internet, air-conditioning, social interaction etc.) they are also concerned about the impact of WFH on their career prospects. Recent graduates worry about the lack of mentoring and visibility, more senior employees worry about how the next promotion will come through. Worries about job security and lack of contact with superiors were fuelling their desire to get back to the office.

Technology - Driving a new wave of hiring and firing
Despite the headlines around job losses across sectors and organisations, there is an increase in opportunities for positions that have been newly created by the adoption of new technologies. For instance, a UK bank was forced to re-engineer a number of their backend processes when lockdowns were imposed leaving their Indian back office redundant. There are likely to be significant job losses in India, however they are now looking to add to their technology teams globally to support the new tech enabled processes which they have deployed.

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.

We would be happy to brainstorm with you and see if there is a way in which we can assist.

Description:

Following the turmoil this year, we have been speaking to our clients and candidates across the world to try and make sense of what is happening and what may come next for hiring and managing talent.

Some common themes that have already been reported:

  1. Work From Home (WFH) is here to stay, though perhaps not at 100%
  2. Most companies have imposed hiring freezes and/or are going through painful downsizing or paycuts
  3. There are multiple applicants for most jobs and many of the candidates are vastly overqualified for these roles
  4. Graduates are in a really tough bind at the moment

And so on….

We also found some other trends that are less obvious and sometimes counterintuitive. Here we share some of the more surprising trends that we have been encountering;

Talent - It is getting harder to hire (yes, really!)
Given the earlier comments about multiple applicants for any job being posted, this statement seems a little daft. In reality, what we saw is that many good candidates are not willing to switch jobs at this time. Even those who had been forced to take a pay cut, were willing to stick it out with their current organisation.

Very few employees working with larger organisations and respected brands were willing to consider a change, despite being offered higher salaries. Those who had recently been let go were still wary of taking on a job with lesser known companies and preferred organisations perceived to be more stable.

Trepidation - Employees are worried about WFH
Many articles have predicted how organisations will be forced to allow employees much greater flexibility and freedom in working from home. In reality, many employees want to get back to the office. Apart from the obvious reasons (children, internet, air-conditioning, social interaction etc.) they are also concerned about the impact of WFH on their career prospects. Recent graduates worry about the lack of mentoring and visibility, more senior employees worry about how the next promotion will come through. Worries about job security and lack of contact with superiors were fuelling their desire to get back to the office.

Technology - Driving a new wave of hiring and firing
Despite the headlines around job losses across sectors and organisations, there is an increase in opportunities for positions that have been newly created by the adoption of new technologies. For instance, a UK bank was forced to re-engineer a number of their backend processes when lockdowns were imposed leaving their Indian back office redundant. There are likely to be significant job losses in India, however they are now looking to add to their technology teams globally to support the new tech enabled processes which they have deployed.

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.

We would be happy to brainstorm with you and see if there is a way in which we can assist.

Related Keyphrases:

significant job losses | many good candidates | social interaction etc | multiple applicants | senior employees | possible solutions | many employees | talent management | new technologies | office redundant | surprising trends | service offerings | counterintuitive | obvious reasons | technology teams

If you are looking for a new job right now, you will be using Linkedin to search for the latest opportunities. Many of these new jobs are advertised by recruitment firms, or headhunters. In this blog, we provide tips on how to approach recruiters or respond to job adverts, for success.  


Most recruitment firms like our team at Select Global Solutions, are being bombarded with requests for jobs at this difficult time during COVID19, therefore it is important that candidates standout during their applications and messages to us.


Some tips below:


  1. While replying to any posted Job Advertisement on LinkedIn, do not just write “Interested” or “visit my profile”. To catch the recruiter's attention, put in the effort to visit the Job advertised and if it matches your skill sets or present portfolio that you are handling, reply highlighting the key attributes of the Job that you are handling with the years of experience. Refrain for showing interest in every role that has been advertised.
  2. A strict no-no is typos, spelling mistakes and grammatical goof-ups. Such errors are a big put-off for recruiters, who see the candidate as a person who does not pay attention to detail.
  3. A working LinkedIn account and significant number of connections in the industry also indicate a genuine profile.
  4. If you send a message to a recruiter, keep it brief! Sending a 2 page intro through LinkedIn doesn't work!
  5. Do not hound recruiters, this comes across as unprofessional, and will be more of a deterrent. Instead, follow up at regular but sensible intervals, with a short message, or understand their response and act accordingly.

Description:

If you are looking for a new job right now, you will be using Linkedin to search for the latest opportunities. Many of these new jobs are advertised by recruitment firms, or headhunters. In this blog, we provide tips on how to approach recruiters or respond to job adverts, for success.  


Most recruitment firms like our team at Select Global Solutions, are being bombarded with requests for jobs at this difficult time during COVID19, therefore it is important that candidates standout during their applications and messages to us.


Some tips below:


  1. While replying to any posted Job Advertisement on LinkedIn, do not just write “Interested” or “visit my profile”. To catch the recruiter's attention, put in the effort to visit the Job advertised and if it matches your skill sets or present portfolio that you are handling, reply highlighting the key attributes of the Job that you are handling with the years of experience. Refrain for showing interest in every role that has been advertised.
  2. A strict no-no is typos, spelling mistakes and grammatical goof-ups. Such errors are a big put-off for recruiters, who see the candidate as a person who does not pay attention to detail.
  3. A working LinkedIn account and significant number of connections in the industry also indicate a genuine profile.
  4. If you send a message to a recruiter, keep it brief! Sending a 2 page intro through LinkedIn doesn't work!
  5. Do not hound recruiters, this comes across as unprofessional, and will be more of a deterrent. Instead, follow up at regular but sensible intervals, with a short message, or understand their response and act accordingly.

Related Keyphrases:

Select Global Solutions | recruitment firms | Job Advertisement | sensible intervals | significant number | hound recruiters | LinkedIn account | present portfolio | pay attention | key attributes | unprofessional | difficult time | short message | opportunities | 2 page intro

Major African countries update regarding COVID 19 active cases and lockdown status as of June 19th:-

  • Confirmed cases = 267,818
  • Number of deaths = 7,219
  • Recoveries = 123,054
  • Active cases = 137,545


Nigeria- Lagos state announced that the reopening of places of worship would be delayed. Domestic flights in Nigeria are scheduled to resume from Sunday, June 21.


South Africa- South Africa has opted to ease lockdown restrictions further even though coronavirus cases are beginning to rise rapidly, parts of the leisure industry will reopen soon.


Libya- The Tripoli-based Government of National Accord (GNA) extension the lockdown in the areas it controls for a further ten days until Saturday, June 27.


Kenya- It is expected that air travel will be fully operational by the third quarter of the year. The airline sees the move as the best-case scenario but warns that the ultimate length of suspension of the flight business is still uncertain.


Morocco- Zone one, which currently includes predominantly rural provinces and prefectures, will see restrictions eased significantly, with the lifting of movement restrictions within the region and the reopening of some non-essential businesses. zone two, which covers all major cities including Rabat, Casablanca, and Marrakech, although opening hours for essential businesses have been extended until 20:00 (local time).


Ethiopia- Elections planned for May this year were also postponed citing the effect of the pandemic.


Senegal- The Government of Senegal extended the current State of Emergency through July 2, Under the new rules, curfews will run from 9:00 pm to 5:00 am, shaving two hours off the current restrictions.



Detailed updates are as below:


NIGERIA

On Tuesday, June 16, authorities in Lagos state announced that the reopening of places of worship, which were closed as a precaution to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), would be delayed. Mosques and churches were expected to reopen on Friday, June 19, but will now remain closed until further notice. As of Wednesday, June 17, places of worship in the rest of Nigeria are to reopen on Friday as planned.

Interstate travel remains restricted, although domestic flights in Nigeria are scheduled to resume from Sunday, June 21. Flights will initially depart from Abuja Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport (ABV), Lagos Murtala Mohammed International Airport (LOS), Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport (KAN), Port Harcourt International Airport (PHC), and Owerri Sam Mbakwe International Cargo Airport (QOW). Other airports will be permitted to operate following further review. The government offered no comment on when international flights will be permitted, with only emergency and cargo flights currently operating.

The use of face masks in public places and social distancing rules remain in place. Businesses such as bars, gyms, clubs, and spas are still closed. Restrictions on movement between 22:00 and 04:00 (local time) are also in place, with the exception of the transporting of agricultural produce, manufactured goods, petroleum products, and other essential goods. Public employees have been advised to remain at home unless they are providing essential services.

(Active cases: 18480) 


SOUTH AFRICA

In the face of a deteriorating economic situation, South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa has opted to ease lockdown restrictions further even though coronavirus cases are beginning to rise rapidly. In the past week alone, the number has increased by 37%.


The president highlighted the need to preserve peoples' livelihoods, as a result he said that parts of the leisure industry will reopen soon. At the end of March, the country entered into one of the strictest lockdown regimes in the world, almost all movement outside was restricted, and the sale of cigarettes and alcohol was banned. Nevertheless, sit-down restaurants, casinos, hotels and hairdressers, among other businesses will now be able to reopen, which could see half a million people going back to work but no date was set for when this will happen. At the beginning of the month, the key mining sector as well as manufacturing businesses were allowed to return to normal production levels. People were also allowed outside and the ban on the sale of alcohol to drink at home was lifted between Monday and Thursday.


South Africa's economy has taken a massive knock as a result of months of lockdown and the further easing of restrictions will be welcome relief to struggling small business owners. Following further discussions with industry representatives on stringent prevention protocols, and after advice from scientists and consultation with Premiers, Cabinet has decided to ease restrictions on certain other economic activities like Restaurants for ‘sit-down’ meals, Accredited and licensed accommodation with the exception of home sharing accommodation like Airbnb, Conferences and meetings for business purposes and in line with restrictions on public gatherings, Cinemas and theatres, to be aligned to limitations on the gathering of people, Casinos, Personal care services, including hairdressers and beauty services, Non-contact sports such as golf, tennis, cricket and others while contact sports will be allowed only for training and modified activities with restricted use of facilities.


(Active cases: 83890) 


GHANA

Ghana is West Africa’s most impacted nation behind Nigeria. President Akufo-Addo in his tenth address announced that whiles borders remained closed, some categories of academic institutions are allowed to resume, religious places can also reopen with strict conditions and the observance of health protocols. Social gatherings -weddings, funerals etc. – are to be allowed under certain conditions. As the 2020 polls loom, even political activity is allowed to be undertaken.


From Friday, June 5, schools have reopened for final year students, and conferences, weddings, burials, non-contact sport, and political activities, all with less than 100 participants, are permitted to resume. Also, Faith-based organizations allowed to start communal worship, effective Friday, June 5, amid social distancing and hygiene protocols, all schools, both private and public remain closed. Only final year students access those facilities. Each student, teacher and non-teaching staff will be provided with reusable face mask by the Ministry of Education prior to reopening for final year students. Festivals, sporting events, nightclubs, cinemas, and political rallies will remain banned, and the closure of Ghana's borders has been extended indefinitely.


All vehicles undertaking intra-city travel must reduce their number of passengers to observe social-distancing measures. It is mandatory for all individuals to wear face masks in public in the Greater Accra Region and in Cape Coast Metropolis.


(Active cases: 12929)


LIBYA


The Tripoli-based Government of National Accord (GNA) announced on Wednesday, June 17, that it would be extending the lockdown in the areas it controls for a further ten days until Saturday, June 27, in efforts to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).


The decision comes as the number of cases continues to rise daily nationwide. Following advice from health authorities, the daily curfew which is in effect between 20:00 and 06:00 (local time) will also be extended during this time and a 24-hour curfew will be imposed for Friday, June 19, and Saturday, June 20. Health authorities have also recommended that facemasks be made compulsory to be worn by all individuals.


Land and sea border crossing points within GNA territory were closed by Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj on Monday, March 16. All mosques, schools, restaurants, wedding halls, parks, and shops remain closed as a precaution. 

(Active cases: 510)


KENYA

Kenya has recorded its highest single-day increase in new COVID-19 infections after the health ministry announced 184 new cases. The Chief Administrative Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Rashid Aman, announced the figure in a press briefing in Nairobi on Wednesday. Aman said the East African country’s numbers were increasing because of community transmission, noting that one more county had registered a case of the disease. 40 of Kenya’s 47 counties have recorded COVID-19 cases even as the government reiterates calls for stronger measures in the county level. Kenya has now reported a total of 4,044 COVID-19 infections with 107 deaths.

In a bid to stop further spread of COVID-19, the Kenyan government imposed a nationwide curfew and a partial lockdown, but these measures were eased last month as the country’s economy took a battering from the restrictions. Schools, churches, and institutions were also ordered shut as the government banned public gatherings. The current set of restrictions is due to end in early July, but fears remain the situation may not be contained by then. Kenya Airways (KQ) plans to resume passenger flights as soon as the government lifts a travel ban that had been imposed on international flights on March 22, ending months of lost revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It is expected that air travel will be fully operational by the third quarter of the year. The airline sees the move as the best-case scenario but warns that the ultimate length of suspension of the flight business is still uncertain. Discussions with key industry stakeholders are going on in relation to a safe return to passenger routes, the airline says. The airline has been operating only cargo flights for essentials services such as medicine, but it has not been enough to sustain business given that it was already a loss territory before the coronavirus pandemic.

(Active cases: 4044)


MOROCCO

Morocco’s government was expected to further ease lockdown measures in the North African country from Wednesday while extending the public health state of emergency, according to informed sources at the interior ministry. Zone one, which currently includes predominantly rural provinces and prefectures, will see restrictions eased significantly, with the lifting of movement restrictions within the region and the reopening of some non-essential businesses. Parks and other public spaces will also be reopened, although public gatherings and events remain prohibited. More stringent restrictions will remain in place in zone two, which covers all major cities including Rabat, Casablanca, and Marrakech, although opening hours for essential businesses have been extended until 20:00 (local time). Movement restrictions within zone two areas remain in effect and permits are required for essential travel. Public gatherings and events also remain prohibited. 

(Active cases: 8997)


ZAMBIA

Zambia’s President Edgar Lungu says he will not authorize the re-opening of bars and nightclubs despite mounting pressure. Zambia currently has a total of 1,382 positive coronavirus cases out of 45,248 tests conducted. A total of 1,142 people have recovered while 11 have died from the virus. Mr Lungu ordered the closure of bars and nightclubs two months ago in a bid to fend off rising cases of Covid-19.He now says that although he has received recommendations for the re-opening of bars and nightclubs from stakeholders, such a decision will be guided by socio-economic and health considerations. The Government of Zambia has suspended all tourist visas until further notice. 

(Active cases: 1412) 


ETHIOPIA

Ethiopia is one of East / Horn of Africa’s least impacted nations as compared to rate of COVID-19 case growth and infection of its neighbors. A state of emergency lasting five-months has been imposed by the Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed led government. All land borders have since been shut as a virus control measure with a raft of restrictions and enforcement of physical distancing and mask wearing measures. Elections planned for May this year were also postponed citing the effect of the pandemic. Ethiopian Airlines has suspended flights due to this pandemic.  

(Active cases: 3759)


SENEGAL

The Government of Senegal extended the current State of Emergency through July 2, Under the new rules, curfews will run from 9:00 pm to 5:00 am, shaving two hours off the current restrictions. Senegalese President Macky Sall announced the re-opening of mosques and churches and the easing of other restrictions imposed to contain the coronavirus, even as the largest one-day jump in cases was recorded on Monday. Sall ordered places of worship closed in March and imposed a dawn-to-dusk curfew. Since then, the daily pace of new cases has picked up, 177 on Monday from a previous high of 104, with increasing community transmission in hotspots such as the holy city of Touba. Schools will remain closed until further notice. On May 30, the Government of Senegal extended the suspension of all international air travel (with limited exceptions) through June 30, 2020. Land borders are closed.

(Active cases: 5369)


RWANDA

Rwanda says it will announce new restrictions on containing the coronavirus Tuesday, a stark reversal of the country's plan days ago to ease restrictions, including motor vehicle travel throughout the country. Rwanda's latest move is linked to the east African country’s first recorded death from the coronavirus and a surge in cases over the weekend.  Public transport in Rusizi and Rubavu districts remains closed. Borders remain closed. Rwanda also decided to continue restrictions on motor vehicle travel between provinces and the City of Kigali in an effort to protect the public from the spread of the virus. 

(Active cases: 639)

UGANDA

Uganda Civil Aviation Authority (UCAA) has announced new measures to contain the spread of Covid-19 as it plans the reopening of the country's Entebbe International Airport. Only humanitarian, evacuation and cargo flights are allowed.  The government has not announced when the airport would be opened but it has started easing the Covid-19 lockdown restrictions. Public and private transport, shops, restaurants and hotels are all reopened. Public gatherings, worship centers and schools remain closed, and a night curfew is still in place. While the country is easing the restrictions, Covid-19 cases are increasing and the national tally is 657, including 118 recoveries. No death has been registered, according to figures from the Ministry of Health.

(Active cases: 732)

ANGOLA

Citizens are urged to stay at home where possible, but some commercial activities are allowed to resume, under certain health conditions. Permitted capacities in workplaces will gradually increase in incremental phases between May 26 and July 27. Restaurants are allowed to reopen at lunchtime between Monday and Saturday and until 22:30 from June 8. Establishments must ensure diners are spaced two meters (6 ft) apart, tables are limited to four people, and the restaurant is under 50 percent capacity. Markets and street vendors can operate between 06:00 and 15:00(local time), with buyers and sellers required to wear face masks and maintain social distance. Informal markets with a large concentration of people are prohibited. Hotels may reopen but temperature checks will be mandatory at the entrance and stringent cleaning policies must be adhered to. Nightlife establishments remain closed until further regulations are approved.


Recreational, cultural, and leisure activities will resume in three phases. From June 8, museums, theaters, monuments, exhibitions, fairs, and art galleries are operating. Libraries will reopen on July 13, and cinemas from July 31. In all cases rooms will be limited to 50 percent capacity, face masks will be mandatory, and social distance must be maintained.


All commercial flights to and from Angola have been suspended indefinitely since March 20 and Angola's borders remain closed. However, under the new state of calamity Angolan nationals and foreign residents can now return, subject to medical checks. 

(Active cases: 166)


GAMBIA

President Adama Barrow announced on Wednesday, June 10, that The Gambia's public health emergency in response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has been extended by 21 days until July 1. The move follows the easing of some COVID-19 restrictions on June 4, with religious services allowed to resume with social distancing measures in place, and markets authorized to open between 06:00 and 18:00 (local time).


All flights in and out of The Gambia, apart from medical and air freight operations, were suspended on March 23. The land border with Senegal has also been closed except to essential supplies and security personnel. Restrictions have been placed on public transport and passengers in private vehicles are limited to no more than half capacity. Vehicles carrying commercial goods are only allowed to have one passenger in the cabin. Ferries and commercial boats can only operate between the hours of 06:00 and 19:00 daily.

(Active cases: 36)



MOZAMBIQUE


The Mozambican Government announced a continuation of the Level-3 State of Emergency until June 30. Some of the measures include use of face masks in all public places, on public and private communal transport, and in any gathering of people, continued closure of all schools, prohibition of cultural, recreational, and sports activities in public spaces, closure of entertainment establishments, including museums, theaters, libraries, bars, pools, and gyms, closure of all beaches for leisure activities with the exception of physical fitness activities, suspension of religious services and celebrations in all places of worship, reduction of workforce to 1/3 present at work place with turnover of teams every 15 days, continued business at markets from 6 a.m. – 5 p.m. subject to recommendation of competent health authorities and implementation of prevention and control measures within the markets.

Mozambique’s civil aviation authority has suspended international passenger flights until further notice.

(Active cases: 662)


TANZANIA

President John Pombe Magufuli has ordered that all schools across the country be reopened at the end of this month. He gave the directives during a speech at the dissolution of the 11th parliament yesterday.

The order comes weeks after universities and other institutions of learning resumed teaching and learning activities with strict guidelines.

The president said with continuous drop in coronavirus cases, there was no need to keep schools closed. He, however, tasked members of the public to adhere to health and hygiene protocols.

Schools were shut in March due to the coronavirus outbreak. The latest order means Tanzania becomes the first in the region to order a full reopening of schools. Weeks back, international air space was opened with government having declared victory over the virus. 

(Active cases: 509) 


MALAWI

Malawi was one of the last countries in the world to announce its first case of Covid-19. But ever since, it has been embroiled in a constitutional row about a lockdown the government wants to impose to tackle the pandemic. The High Court took the unprecedented step of blocking the government's plans who wanted to impose another 21 days lockdown after May 9th until more had been done to help those worst affected. Now, President Peter Mutharika has announced an emergency cash transfer program for the poorest people in what is one of the world's poorest countries. The government will target 172,000 households, who will receive a monthly payment equivalent to almost $50 (£40) through mobile money transfer from Friday. The Malawi Department of Civil Aviation announced that all international flights to and from Malawi will be suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 592) 


SOMALIA


On Monday, April 13, General Abdi Hassan Mohamed Hajar, Somali commander of police, announced that a nighttime curfew would be implemented in Mogadishu for an indefinite period from Wednesday, April 15 to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The nightly curfew will be in effect between 20:00 and 05:00 (local time). Also, all international flights to and from Somalia are indefinitely suspended.

(Active cases: 2719)

Description:

Major African countries update regarding COVID 19 active cases and lockdown status as of June 19th:-

  • Confirmed cases = 267,818
  • Number of deaths = 7,219
  • Recoveries = 123,054
  • Active cases = 137,545


Nigeria- Lagos state announced that the reopening of places of worship would be delayed. Domestic flights in Nigeria are scheduled to resume from Sunday, June 21.


South Africa- South Africa has opted to ease lockdown restrictions further even though coronavirus cases are beginning to rise rapidly, parts of the leisure industry will reopen soon.


Libya- The Tripoli-based Government of National Accord (GNA) extension the lockdown in the areas it controls for a further ten days until Saturday, June 27.


Kenya- It is expected that air travel will be fully operational by the third quarter of the year. The airline sees the move as the best-case scenario but warns that the ultimate length of suspension of the flight business is still uncertain.


Morocco- Zone one, which currently includes predominantly rural provinces and prefectures, will see restrictions eased significantly, with the lifting of movement restrictions within the region and the reopening of some non-essential businesses. zone two, which covers all major cities including Rabat, Casablanca, and Marrakech, although opening hours for essential businesses have been extended until 20:00 (local time).


Ethiopia- Elections planned for May this year were also postponed citing the effect of the pandemic.


Senegal- The Government of Senegal extended the current State of Emergency through July 2, Under the new rules, curfews will run from 9:00 pm to 5:00 am, shaving two hours off the current restrictions.



Detailed updates are as below:


NIGERIA

On Tuesday, June 16, authorities in Lagos state announced that the reopening of places of worship, which were closed as a precaution to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), would be delayed. Mosques and churches were expected to reopen on Friday, June 19, but will now remain closed until further notice. As of Wednesday, June 17, places of worship in the rest of Nigeria are to reopen on Friday as planned.

Interstate travel remains restricted, although domestic flights in Nigeria are scheduled to resume from Sunday, June 21. Flights will initially depart from Abuja Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport (ABV), Lagos Murtala Mohammed International Airport (LOS), Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport (KAN), Port Harcourt International Airport (PHC), and Owerri Sam Mbakwe International Cargo Airport (QOW). Other airports will be permitted to operate following further review. The government offered no comment on when international flights will be permitted, with only emergency and cargo flights currently operating.

The use of face masks in public places and social distancing rules remain in place. Businesses such as bars, gyms, clubs, and spas are still closed. Restrictions on movement between 22:00 and 04:00 (local time) are also in place, with the exception of the transporting of agricultural produce, manufactured goods, petroleum products, and other essential goods. Public employees have been advised to remain at home unless they are providing essential services.

(Active cases: 18480) 


SOUTH AFRICA

In the face of a deteriorating economic situation, South Africa's President Cyril Ramaphosa has opted to ease lockdown restrictions further even though coronavirus cases are beginning to rise rapidly. In the past week alone, the number has increased by 37%.


The president highlighted the need to preserve peoples' livelihoods, as a result he said that parts of the leisure industry will reopen soon. At the end of March, the country entered into one of the strictest lockdown regimes in the world, almost all movement outside was restricted, and the sale of cigarettes and alcohol was banned. Nevertheless, sit-down restaurants, casinos, hotels and hairdressers, among other businesses will now be able to reopen, which could see half a million people going back to work but no date was set for when this will happen. At the beginning of the month, the key mining sector as well as manufacturing businesses were allowed to return to normal production levels. People were also allowed outside and the ban on the sale of alcohol to drink at home was lifted between Monday and Thursday.


South Africa's economy has taken a massive knock as a result of months of lockdown and the further easing of restrictions will be welcome relief to struggling small business owners. Following further discussions with industry representatives on stringent prevention protocols, and after advice from scientists and consultation with Premiers, Cabinet has decided to ease restrictions on certain other economic activities like Restaurants for ‘sit-down’ meals, Accredited and licensed accommodation with the exception of home sharing accommodation like Airbnb, Conferences and meetings for business purposes and in line with restrictions on public gatherings, Cinemas and theatres, to be aligned to limitations on the gathering of people, Casinos, Personal care services, including hairdressers and beauty services, Non-contact sports such as golf, tennis, cricket and others while contact sports will be allowed only for training and modified activities with restricted use of facilities.


(Active cases: 83890) 


GHANA

Ghana is West Africa’s most impacted nation behind Nigeria. President Akufo-Addo in his tenth address announced that whiles borders remained closed, some categories of academic institutions are allowed to resume, religious places can also reopen with strict conditions and the observance of health protocols. Social gatherings -weddings, funerals etc. – are to be allowed under certain conditions. As the 2020 polls loom, even political activity is allowed to be undertaken.


From Friday, June 5, schools have reopened for final year students, and conferences, weddings, burials, non-contact sport, and political activities, all with less than 100 participants, are permitted to resume. Also, Faith-based organizations allowed to start communal worship, effective Friday, June 5, amid social distancing and hygiene protocols, all schools, both private and public remain closed. Only final year students access those facilities. Each student, teacher and non-teaching staff will be provided with reusable face mask by the Ministry of Education prior to reopening for final year students. Festivals, sporting events, nightclubs, cinemas, and political rallies will remain banned, and the closure of Ghana's borders has been extended indefinitely.


All vehicles undertaking intra-city travel must reduce their number of passengers to observe social-distancing measures. It is mandatory for all individuals to wear face masks in public in the Greater Accra Region and in Cape Coast Metropolis.


(Active cases: 12929)


LIBYA


The Tripoli-based Government of National Accord (GNA) announced on Wednesday, June 17, that it would be extending the lockdown in the areas it controls for a further ten days until Saturday, June 27, in efforts to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).


The decision comes as the number of cases continues to rise daily nationwide. Following advice from health authorities, the daily curfew which is in effect between 20:00 and 06:00 (local time) will also be extended during this time and a 24-hour curfew will be imposed for Friday, June 19, and Saturday, June 20. Health authorities have also recommended that facemasks be made compulsory to be worn by all individuals.


Land and sea border crossing points within GNA territory were closed by Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj on Monday, March 16. All mosques, schools, restaurants, wedding halls, parks, and shops remain closed as a precaution. 

(Active cases: 510)


KENYA

Kenya has recorded its highest single-day increase in new COVID-19 infections after the health ministry announced 184 new cases. The Chief Administrative Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Rashid Aman, announced the figure in a press briefing in Nairobi on Wednesday. Aman said the East African country’s numbers were increasing because of community transmission, noting that one more county had registered a case of the disease. 40 of Kenya’s 47 counties have recorded COVID-19 cases even as the government reiterates calls for stronger measures in the county level. Kenya has now reported a total of 4,044 COVID-19 infections with 107 deaths.

In a bid to stop further spread of COVID-19, the Kenyan government imposed a nationwide curfew and a partial lockdown, but these measures were eased last month as the country’s economy took a battering from the restrictions. Schools, churches, and institutions were also ordered shut as the government banned public gatherings. The current set of restrictions is due to end in early July, but fears remain the situation may not be contained by then. Kenya Airways (KQ) plans to resume passenger flights as soon as the government lifts a travel ban that had been imposed on international flights on March 22, ending months of lost revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It is expected that air travel will be fully operational by the third quarter of the year. The airline sees the move as the best-case scenario but warns that the ultimate length of suspension of the flight business is still uncertain. Discussions with key industry stakeholders are going on in relation to a safe return to passenger routes, the airline says. The airline has been operating only cargo flights for essentials services such as medicine, but it has not been enough to sustain business given that it was already a loss territory before the coronavirus pandemic.

(Active cases: 4044)


MOROCCO

Morocco’s government was expected to further ease lockdown measures in the North African country from Wednesday while extending the public health state of emergency, according to informed sources at the interior ministry. Zone one, which currently includes predominantly rural provinces and prefectures, will see restrictions eased significantly, with the lifting of movement restrictions within the region and the reopening of some non-essential businesses. Parks and other public spaces will also be reopened, although public gatherings and events remain prohibited. More stringent restrictions will remain in place in zone two, which covers all major cities including Rabat, Casablanca, and Marrakech, although opening hours for essential businesses have been extended until 20:00 (local time). Movement restrictions within zone two areas remain in effect and permits are required for essential travel. Public gatherings and events also remain prohibited. 

(Active cases: 8997)


ZAMBIA

Zambia’s President Edgar Lungu says he will not authorize the re-opening of bars and nightclubs despite mounting pressure. Zambia currently has a total of 1,382 positive coronavirus cases out of 45,248 tests conducted. A total of 1,142 people have recovered while 11 have died from the virus. Mr Lungu ordered the closure of bars and nightclubs two months ago in a bid to fend off rising cases of Covid-19.He now says that although he has received recommendations for the re-opening of bars and nightclubs from stakeholders, such a decision will be guided by socio-economic and health considerations. The Government of Zambia has suspended all tourist visas until further notice. 

(Active cases: 1412) 


ETHIOPIA

Ethiopia is one of East / Horn of Africa’s least impacted nations as compared to rate of COVID-19 case growth and infection of its neighbors. A state of emergency lasting five-months has been imposed by the Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed led government. All land borders have since been shut as a virus control measure with a raft of restrictions and enforcement of physical distancing and mask wearing measures. Elections planned for May this year were also postponed citing the effect of the pandemic. Ethiopian Airlines has suspended flights due to this pandemic.  

(Active cases: 3759)


SENEGAL

The Government of Senegal extended the current State of Emergency through July 2, Under the new rules, curfews will run from 9:00 pm to 5:00 am, shaving two hours off the current restrictions. Senegalese President Macky Sall announced the re-opening of mosques and churches and the easing of other restrictions imposed to contain the coronavirus, even as the largest one-day jump in cases was recorded on Monday. Sall ordered places of worship closed in March and imposed a dawn-to-dusk curfew. Since then, the daily pace of new cases has picked up, 177 on Monday from a previous high of 104, with increasing community transmission in hotspots such as the holy city of Touba. Schools will remain closed until further notice. On May 30, the Government of Senegal extended the suspension of all international air travel (with limited exceptions) through June 30, 2020. Land borders are closed.

(Active cases: 5369)


RWANDA

Rwanda says it will announce new restrictions on containing the coronavirus Tuesday, a stark reversal of the country's plan days ago to ease restrictions, including motor vehicle travel throughout the country. Rwanda's latest move is linked to the east African country’s first recorded death from the coronavirus and a surge in cases over the weekend.  Public transport in Rusizi and Rubavu districts remains closed. Borders remain closed. Rwanda also decided to continue restrictions on motor vehicle travel between provinces and the City of Kigali in an effort to protect the public from the spread of the virus. 

(Active cases: 639)

UGANDA

Uganda Civil Aviation Authority (UCAA) has announced new measures to contain the spread of Covid-19 as it plans the reopening of the country's Entebbe International Airport. Only humanitarian, evacuation and cargo flights are allowed.  The government has not announced when the airport would be opened but it has started easing the Covid-19 lockdown restrictions. Public and private transport, shops, restaurants and hotels are all reopened. Public gatherings, worship centers and schools remain closed, and a night curfew is still in place. While the country is easing the restrictions, Covid-19 cases are increasing and the national tally is 657, including 118 recoveries. No death has been registered, according to figures from the Ministry of Health.

(Active cases: 732)

ANGOLA

Citizens are urged to stay at home where possible, but some commercial activities are allowed to resume, under certain health conditions. Permitted capacities in workplaces will gradually increase in incremental phases between May 26 and July 27. Restaurants are allowed to reopen at lunchtime between Monday and Saturday and until 22:30 from June 8. Establishments must ensure diners are spaced two meters (6 ft) apart, tables are limited to four people, and the restaurant is under 50 percent capacity. Markets and street vendors can operate between 06:00 and 15:00(local time), with buyers and sellers required to wear face masks and maintain social distance. Informal markets with a large concentration of people are prohibited. Hotels may reopen but temperature checks will be mandatory at the entrance and stringent cleaning policies must be adhered to. Nightlife establishments remain closed until further regulations are approved.


Recreational, cultural, and leisure activities will resume in three phases. From June 8, museums, theaters, monuments, exhibitions, fairs, and art galleries are operating. Libraries will reopen on July 13, and cinemas from July 31. In all cases rooms will be limited to 50 percent capacity, face masks will be mandatory, and social distance must be maintained.


All commercial flights to and from Angola have been suspended indefinitely since March 20 and Angola's borders remain closed. However, under the new state of calamity Angolan nationals and foreign residents can now return, subject to medical checks. 

(Active cases: 166)


GAMBIA

President Adama Barrow announced on Wednesday, June 10, that The Gambia's public health emergency in response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has been extended by 21 days until July 1. The move follows the easing of some COVID-19 restrictions on June 4, with religious services allowed to resume with social distancing measures in place, and markets authorized to open between 06:00 and 18:00 (local time).


All flights in and out of The Gambia, apart from medical and air freight operations, were suspended on March 23. The land border with Senegal has also been closed except to essential supplies and security personnel. Restrictions have been placed on public transport and passengers in private vehicles are limited to no more than half capacity. Vehicles carrying commercial goods are only allowed to have one passenger in the cabin. Ferries and commercial boats can only operate between the hours of 06:00 and 19:00 daily.

(Active cases: 36)



MOZAMBIQUE


The Mozambican Government announced a continuation of the Level-3 State of Emergency until June 30. Some of the measures include use of face masks in all public places, on public and private communal transport, and in any gathering of people, continued closure of all schools, prohibition of cultural, recreational, and sports activities in public spaces, closure of entertainment establishments, including museums, theaters, libraries, bars, pools, and gyms, closure of all beaches for leisure activities with the exception of physical fitness activities, suspension of religious services and celebrations in all places of worship, reduction of workforce to 1/3 present at work place with turnover of teams every 15 days, continued business at markets from 6 a.m. – 5 p.m. subject to recommendation of competent health authorities and implementation of prevention and control measures within the markets.

Mozambique’s civil aviation authority has suspended international passenger flights until further notice.

(Active cases: 662)


TANZANIA

President John Pombe Magufuli has ordered that all schools across the country be reopened at the end of this month. He gave the directives during a speech at the dissolution of the 11th parliament yesterday.

The order comes weeks after universities and other institutions of learning resumed teaching and learning activities with strict guidelines.

The president said with continuous drop in coronavirus cases, there was no need to keep schools closed. He, however, tasked members of the public to adhere to health and hygiene protocols.

Schools were shut in March due to the coronavirus outbreak. The latest order means Tanzania becomes the first in the region to order a full reopening of schools. Weeks back, international air space was opened with government having declared victory over the virus. 

(Active cases: 509) 


MALAWI

Malawi was one of the last countries in the world to announce its first case of Covid-19. But ever since, it has been embroiled in a constitutional row about a lockdown the government wants to impose to tackle the pandemic. The High Court took the unprecedented step of blocking the government's plans who wanted to impose another 21 days lockdown after May 9th until more had been done to help those worst affected. Now, President Peter Mutharika has announced an emergency cash transfer program for the poorest people in what is one of the world's poorest countries. The government will target 172,000 households, who will receive a monthly payment equivalent to almost $50 (£40) through mobile money transfer from Friday. The Malawi Department of Civil Aviation announced that all international flights to and from Malawi will be suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 592) 


SOMALIA


On Monday, April 13, General Abdi Hassan Mohamed Hajar, Somali commander of police, announced that a nighttime curfew would be implemented in Mogadishu for an indefinite period from Wednesday, April 15 to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The nightly curfew will be in effect between 20:00 and 05:00 (local time). Also, all international flights to and from Somalia are indefinitely suspended.

(Active cases: 2719)

Related Keyphrases:

COVID 19 active cases | positive coronavirus cases | government banned public gatherings | ease lockdown restrictions | Lagos Murtala Mohammed International Airport | Owerri Sam Mbakwe International Cargo Airport | announce new restrictions | international passenger flights | 184 new cases | Abuja Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport | lockdown restrictions | Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport | public health emergency | current restrictions

Major African countries update regarding COVID 19 active cases and lockdown status as of May 22nd :-

  • Confirmed cases = 95,482
  • Number of deaths = 3,000
  • Recoveries = 38,120
  • Active cases = 54,362

Angola- The new measures come as the government started to relax COVID-19 restrictions from Monday, May 11.


Zambia- Zambia reopens its borders with Tanzania from May 11, 2020 as Zambia reopens gradually with safety measures.


Tanzania- Tanzanian authorities lifted restrictions on international commercial flights from May 18th.


Mozambique- Mozambique extended the state of emergency until May 30th while flights remains suspended till May 31st.


Uganda- Kampala lockdown scheduled to be lifted on 3rd June.??? 


Morocco- Morocco is to extend its national lockdown to contain the spread of the new coronavirus until June 10.


Algeria- Algeria has imposed a 5 pm to 7 am curfew in Algiers, Oran, Bejaia, Setif, Tizi Ouzou, Tipaza, Tlemcen, Ain Defla, and Medea, and a 2 pm to 7 am curfew in Blida. All other wilayas are under curfew from 7 pm to 7 am.


Ghana- A month since Ghana opened, COVID 19 cases crosses 6000 mark.



Detailed updates are as below:



SOUTH AFRICA

South Africa, which has the highest number of confirmed infections on the continent, eased some restrictions on 1 May almost five weeks after imposing a stringent lockdown while a ban on travel across provincial borders without proof of employment or for other essential purposes, a limit of three people per private vehicle, and taxis must operate at 70 percent capacity or below. Restaurants are only allowed to provide delivery services and some retailers can reopen, including clothes shops, hardware stores, and wholesalers. The agricultural sector is permitted to resume full operations and mining can partially resume. Businesses resuming operations must comply with certain health regulations, such as set workforce capacities, providing hand sanitizers, and ensuring social distance is maintained. Schools will be allowed to reopen on 1 June. The government’s Covid-19 modelling team presented forecasts showing a peak in active cases in early July under the pessimistic scenario, or a peak in early August under the optimistic scenario.  Short-term protections are updated on a weekly basis while long-term projections are due to be updated at the beginning of June.

(Active cases: 18003) 


ANGOLA

Angolan authorities placed the Hoji Ya Henda suburb of Luanda on lockdown on Wednesday, May 13, after a number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases were confirmed in the neighborhood. The new measures come as the government started to relax COVID-19 restrictions from Monday, May 11. Security forces have been deployed to the neighborhood and around 3000 residents will reportedly be tested for the virus.


Under the relaxed restrictions, markets and street vendors in Luanda may operate from 06:00 until 14:00 (local time) from Tuesday to Saturday. Public transportation services will run from 05:00 to 18:00 at 50 percent of seating capacity. Civil services can operate daily between 08:00 and 18:00 at 50 percent staff. A state of emergency remains in place until Monday, May 25.


Establishments including schools, restaurants, bars, libraries, leisure facilities, and places of worship remain closed. Mandatory quarantine measures and compulsory COVID-19 testing remains in place and individuals will be required to wear face masks in public areas and on public transportation. All international flights to and from Angola have been suspended indefinitely since March 20. 

(Active cases: 58) 


NIGERIA


Nigerian state has been on an extended lockdown and is among the areas with the highest number of coronavirus cases in the country. Nigeria's government has said it's still too risky to further relax restrictions aimed at halting the spread of coronavirus. Monday was when the first phase of gradual lockdown easing was due to end in the cities of Abuja, Lagos and in Ogun state. But officials now say they will maintain it for further two weeks. Nigeria's Nasarawa state has lifted its ban on religious gatherings for two weeks after which it will be reviewed. After two weeks the state government will consider if the ban will be lifted permanently. This means airports, land borders, schools, parks, and places of worship will remain closed. Large gatherings and interstate travel remain banned. A daily nationwide curfew from 20:00 to 06:00 (local time) remains in force. A ban on domestic flights is in effect until Sunday, June 7. The total lockdown that was imposed in Kano state weeks ago following reports of unexplained deaths also remains in place. But government offices, banks and markets will continue to operate for limited hours.

(Active cases: 6677)


ZAMBIA

Zambia reopened its Nakonde border with Tanzania on Friday for cargo after a five-day closure of the transit point for exports and fuel imports, but people were not allowed to cross. The partial lockdown is in place since May 8 with confinement measures, allowing certain businesses to reopen. Cinemas, restaurants, and gyms will be allowed to resume operations, and authorities are considering reopening hotels and lodges. However, bars remain closed and it is mandatory to wear face masks in public places. Public gatherings of more than 50 people are banned, and authorities have advised citizens to avoid all nonessential foreign travel. Cross border public passenger services, railway passenger services, international flights and cross border cargo transportation are also suspended, although those carrying essential commodities will be allowed into the country. Students who are sitting for exams will return to class on Monday, June 1.

(Active cases: 832) 


TANZANIA

On Monday, May 18, Tanzanian authorities lifted restrictions on international commercial flights and systematic quarantine measures imposed on passengers to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). International commercial flights have been suspended into and out of Tanzanian airports since Sunday, April 12, with only cargo flights exempt. Now all scheduled and unscheduled flights are free to arrive and depart. The mandatory 14-day quarantine period for those arriving into the country has been removed and only those who are showing symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in quarantine unless they have proof of a negative test. Social distancing measures remain in place in Tanzania, including a ban on public gatherings, the closure of schools, and the suspension of sports competitions. The majority of bars, restaurants, and hotels have closed voluntarily, although many restaurants are offering takeaway services.

(Active cases: 509) 


MALAWI

Malawi was one of the last countries in the world to announce its first case of Covid-19. But ever since, it has been embroiled in a constitutional row about a lockdown the government wants to impose to tackle the pandemic. The High Court took the unprecedented step of blocking the government's plans who wanted to impose another 21 days lockdown after May 9th until more had been done to help those worst affected. Now, President Peter Mutharika has announced an emergency cash transfer program for the poorest people in what is one of the world's poorest countries. The government will target 172,000 households, who will receive a monthly payment equivalent to almost $50 (£40) through mobile money transfer from Friday. The Malawi Department of Civil Aviation announced that all international flights to and from Malawi will be suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 71) 


ALGERIA


Algeria has banned all types of gatherings of more than two persons, including the weekly “hirak” demonstration that have taken place for the last 12 months. All houses of worship are closed, including for Friday prayers.  All cultural, sporting, and commercial events are suspended. All Algerian schools, universities, public transportation, restaurants, and cafes (in large cities), public baths, event halls, and nightclubs are closed.  Other measures include requiring citizens to wear a protective mask when in public. Algeria has imposed a 5 pm to 7 am curfew in Algiers, Oran, Bejaia, Setif, Tizi Ouzou, Tipaza, Tlemcen, Ain Defla, and Medea, and a 2 pm to 7 am curfew in Blida.  All other wilayas are under curfew from 7 pm to 7 am. However, the government is reinforcing lockdown measures over the Eid el Fitr holiday, projected to be on May 23-24 or May 24-25. The curfew will be extended from 1 pm until 7 am the following day in all provinces. All vehicular traffic during the two-day holiday is banned.

(Active cases: 7542)


MOZAMBIQUE


President Felipe Nyusi has also extended the state of emergency until Saturday, May 30, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Authorities have urged residents to stay home, except for essential reasons. The use of face masks is mandatory on public and private communal transport and at gatherings. Schools remain closed; cultural, recreational, and sports activities in public spaces remain prohibited. Entertainment establishments, including museums, theaters, libraries, bars, and gyms, are shut as a precautionary measure. Beaches are closed for leisure activities except for fishing. Authorities have also suspended religious services and celebrations at all places of worship. Markets will operate from 06:00 to 1700 (local time), subject to the approval of health authorities. Individuals who do not comply with the measures may be punished under criminal law. On Tuesday, May 12, Mozambique's Civil Aviation Authority extended the current suspension of all international flights until Sunday, May 31, to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). National Carrier LAM Mozambique Airlines continues to operate domestic flights and cargo flights are still permitted. Only Mozambican citizens or foreign residents can return to the country and will have to undergo a mandatory 14-day self-quarantine.

(Active cases: 156) 


GHANA

A month after Ghana lifted the coronavirus lockdown, the case count has surpassed 6000 mark. The tallies showed that four regions had recorded increases: Greater Accra, Ashanti, Western and Central Regions. The president announced that, “despite its disruption to everyday life, it must not hinder lives and economy of the country. The virus is here but we must find a way to live with it with self-discipline and protocols. Now, essential, and non-essential businesses are now allowed to open while wearing of masks. All vehicles undertaking intracity travel like trotros, taxis, and busses are advised to reduce their number of passengers to observe social distancing, all businesses and supermarkets will be enforcing social distancing measures while schools will remain completely closed. President announced the extension of the closure of the country's international borders till May 31, the measure also affects international commercial flights, which will not operate over this period. Citizens returning from abroad and foreign nationals with Ghanaian residence permits will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine period if they show symptoms of the virus. The domestic flights in Ghana resumed from May 1 with precautionary measures, such as safe distancing.

(Active cases: 6269) 


UGANDA

Kampala lockdown is scheduled to be lifted on 3rd June. Uganda banned the use of public and private transport in late March to curb the spread of COVID-19.??? With the ban on cars, the country has seen a boom in demand for bicycles.??? Uganda’s March lockdown to curb the virus included a ban on motor vehicles — both public and private — for nonessential personnel. Uganda has suspended all its international flight until further notice.

(Active cases: 264)


KENYA


As Kenya continues to report more cases of Covid-19, the government nonetheless says it is making progress in containing further spread of the virus. In a virtual address at the 73rd World Health Assembly, Health Minister Mutahi Kagwe said that the country was "making significant and steady progress" towards flattening the curve. Last Friday May 15, President Uhuru Kenyatta extended the lockdown by another 21 days owing to the rise of new infections. Borders are shut and flights are restricted. No travel to or from the capital Nairobi and parts of the city's neighboring counties. Such measures also apply to some coastal counties.

(Active cases: 1029)


MOROCCO


Morocco is to extend its national lockdown to contain the spread of the new coronavirus until June 10, Prime Minister Saad Dine El Otmani said on Monday, as the rise of hotspots within families and factories complicates efforts to curb infections people are only allowed to go out to buy food or medicine, and to staff some key jobs. Schools, mosques, non-essential shops, and all entertainment venues have been closed. Morocco has made wearing masks mandatory, with those who fail to do so at risk of being fined or jailed. Morocco suspended day all international passenger flights to and from its airports as a protective measure against the spread of coronavirus.

(Active cases: 7133) 


LIBYA


The Government announced on Thursday, April 23, that the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) curfew will be modified and the new curfew was implemented on Monday, April 27, that from 18:00 to 06:00 (local time), and individuals are permitted to operate vehicles which was banned during the previous curfew. All mosques, schools, restaurants, wedding halls, parks, and shops are also closed as a precaution. Areas under control of the House of Representatives (HoR) have a curfew from 18:00 to 06:00 during Ramadan. It is unclear as to how long the measure will remain in place. Land and sea border crossing points within GNA territory were closed.

(Active cases: 69) 


RWANDA


Rwanda has loosened restrictions after 45 days of coronavirus lockdown. Markets will open for essential vendors not exceeding 50% of registered traders. Hotels and restaurants will open and close by 7 p.m., but meetings in public spaces and mass gatherings are prohibited Under the new guidelines, the government announced a curfew from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. Borders will also remain closed except for cargo as well as returning Rwandans and legal citizens, who will be subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. The new guidelines restrict funeral gatherings to not more than 30 people, while public and private transport between different provinces and the city of Kigali is not permitted. Schools will remain closed until September as well as places of worship, bars and recreation centers.

(Active cases: 314)


ETHIOPIA


Ethiopia is reluctant to initiate a strict lockdown, which the World Health Organization recommends helping to slow down the spread of the virus. All operations that are now allowed per law must be conducted within strict limits of social distancing and observance of other COVID-19 prevention protocols. The state was also the first to get a testing center. Ethiopia is currently under a five-month state of emergency declared earlier this month to fight the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Ethiopian Airlines has suspended flights due to this pandemic.  

(Active cases: 389) 


SENEGAL


Coronavirus restrictions will be eased in Senegal, President Macky Sall said late on Monday, with night-time curfews shortened and mosques reopened. He said the COVID-19 disease would continue to circulate for at least another three months even under the best-case scenario. Under the new rules, curfews will run from 9:00 pm to 5:00 am, shaving two hours off the current restrictions. Mosques will be reopened for prayers during the holy month of Ramadan, and churches will also be allowed to accept worshippers. Markets and businesses, which have only been allowed to open a few days a week during the lockdown, will now only need to be closed for a day's cleaning each week. Restrictions imposed on public transport will also be eased, though schools will not begin reopening until next month.

(Active cases: 2103)


SOMALIA


On Monday, April 13, General Abdi Hassan Mohamed Hajar, Somali commander of police, announced that a nighttime curfew would be implemented in Mogadishu for an indefinite period from Wednesday, April 15 to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The nightly curfew will be in effect between 20:00 and 05:00 (local time). Also, all international flights to and from Somalia are indefinitely suspended.

(Active cases: 1573) 

Description:

Major African countries update regarding COVID 19 active cases and lockdown status as of May 22nd :-

  • Confirmed cases = 95,482
  • Number of deaths = 3,000
  • Recoveries = 38,120
  • Active cases = 54,362

Angola- The new measures come as the government started to relax COVID-19 restrictions from Monday, May 11.


Zambia- Zambia reopens its borders with Tanzania from May 11, 2020 as Zambia reopens gradually with safety measures.


Tanzania- Tanzanian authorities lifted restrictions on international commercial flights from May 18th.


Mozambique- Mozambique extended the state of emergency until May 30th while flights remains suspended till May 31st.


Uganda- Kampala lockdown scheduled to be lifted on 3rd June.??? 


Morocco- Morocco is to extend its national lockdown to contain the spread of the new coronavirus until June 10.


Algeria- Algeria has imposed a 5 pm to 7 am curfew in Algiers, Oran, Bejaia, Setif, Tizi Ouzou, Tipaza, Tlemcen, Ain Defla, and Medea, and a 2 pm to 7 am curfew in Blida. All other wilayas are under curfew from 7 pm to 7 am.


Ghana- A month since Ghana opened, COVID 19 cases crosses 6000 mark.



Detailed updates are as below:



SOUTH AFRICA

South Africa, which has the highest number of confirmed infections on the continent, eased some restrictions on 1 May almost five weeks after imposing a stringent lockdown while a ban on travel across provincial borders without proof of employment or for other essential purposes, a limit of three people per private vehicle, and taxis must operate at 70 percent capacity or below. Restaurants are only allowed to provide delivery services and some retailers can reopen, including clothes shops, hardware stores, and wholesalers. The agricultural sector is permitted to resume full operations and mining can partially resume. Businesses resuming operations must comply with certain health regulations, such as set workforce capacities, providing hand sanitizers, and ensuring social distance is maintained. Schools will be allowed to reopen on 1 June. The government’s Covid-19 modelling team presented forecasts showing a peak in active cases in early July under the pessimistic scenario, or a peak in early August under the optimistic scenario.  Short-term protections are updated on a weekly basis while long-term projections are due to be updated at the beginning of June.

(Active cases: 18003) 


ANGOLA

Angolan authorities placed the Hoji Ya Henda suburb of Luanda on lockdown on Wednesday, May 13, after a number of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases were confirmed in the neighborhood. The new measures come as the government started to relax COVID-19 restrictions from Monday, May 11. Security forces have been deployed to the neighborhood and around 3000 residents will reportedly be tested for the virus.


Under the relaxed restrictions, markets and street vendors in Luanda may operate from 06:00 until 14:00 (local time) from Tuesday to Saturday. Public transportation services will run from 05:00 to 18:00 at 50 percent of seating capacity. Civil services can operate daily between 08:00 and 18:00 at 50 percent staff. A state of emergency remains in place until Monday, May 25.


Establishments including schools, restaurants, bars, libraries, leisure facilities, and places of worship remain closed. Mandatory quarantine measures and compulsory COVID-19 testing remains in place and individuals will be required to wear face masks in public areas and on public transportation. All international flights to and from Angola have been suspended indefinitely since March 20. 

(Active cases: 58) 


NIGERIA


Nigerian state has been on an extended lockdown and is among the areas with the highest number of coronavirus cases in the country. Nigeria's government has said it's still too risky to further relax restrictions aimed at halting the spread of coronavirus. Monday was when the first phase of gradual lockdown easing was due to end in the cities of Abuja, Lagos and in Ogun state. But officials now say they will maintain it for further two weeks. Nigeria's Nasarawa state has lifted its ban on religious gatherings for two weeks after which it will be reviewed. After two weeks the state government will consider if the ban will be lifted permanently. This means airports, land borders, schools, parks, and places of worship will remain closed. Large gatherings and interstate travel remain banned. A daily nationwide curfew from 20:00 to 06:00 (local time) remains in force. A ban on domestic flights is in effect until Sunday, June 7. The total lockdown that was imposed in Kano state weeks ago following reports of unexplained deaths also remains in place. But government offices, banks and markets will continue to operate for limited hours.

(Active cases: 6677)


ZAMBIA

Zambia reopened its Nakonde border with Tanzania on Friday for cargo after a five-day closure of the transit point for exports and fuel imports, but people were not allowed to cross. The partial lockdown is in place since May 8 with confinement measures, allowing certain businesses to reopen. Cinemas, restaurants, and gyms will be allowed to resume operations, and authorities are considering reopening hotels and lodges. However, bars remain closed and it is mandatory to wear face masks in public places. Public gatherings of more than 50 people are banned, and authorities have advised citizens to avoid all nonessential foreign travel. Cross border public passenger services, railway passenger services, international flights and cross border cargo transportation are also suspended, although those carrying essential commodities will be allowed into the country. Students who are sitting for exams will return to class on Monday, June 1.

(Active cases: 832) 


TANZANIA

On Monday, May 18, Tanzanian authorities lifted restrictions on international commercial flights and systematic quarantine measures imposed on passengers to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). International commercial flights have been suspended into and out of Tanzanian airports since Sunday, April 12, with only cargo flights exempt. Now all scheduled and unscheduled flights are free to arrive and depart. The mandatory 14-day quarantine period for those arriving into the country has been removed and only those who are showing symptoms of COVID-19 will be placed in quarantine unless they have proof of a negative test. Social distancing measures remain in place in Tanzania, including a ban on public gatherings, the closure of schools, and the suspension of sports competitions. The majority of bars, restaurants, and hotels have closed voluntarily, although many restaurants are offering takeaway services.

(Active cases: 509) 


MALAWI

Malawi was one of the last countries in the world to announce its first case of Covid-19. But ever since, it has been embroiled in a constitutional row about a lockdown the government wants to impose to tackle the pandemic. The High Court took the unprecedented step of blocking the government's plans who wanted to impose another 21 days lockdown after May 9th until more had been done to help those worst affected. Now, President Peter Mutharika has announced an emergency cash transfer program for the poorest people in what is one of the world's poorest countries. The government will target 172,000 households, who will receive a monthly payment equivalent to almost $50 (£40) through mobile money transfer from Friday. The Malawi Department of Civil Aviation announced that all international flights to and from Malawi will be suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 71) 


ALGERIA


Algeria has banned all types of gatherings of more than two persons, including the weekly “hirak” demonstration that have taken place for the last 12 months. All houses of worship are closed, including for Friday prayers.  All cultural, sporting, and commercial events are suspended. All Algerian schools, universities, public transportation, restaurants, and cafes (in large cities), public baths, event halls, and nightclubs are closed.  Other measures include requiring citizens to wear a protective mask when in public. Algeria has imposed a 5 pm to 7 am curfew in Algiers, Oran, Bejaia, Setif, Tizi Ouzou, Tipaza, Tlemcen, Ain Defla, and Medea, and a 2 pm to 7 am curfew in Blida.  All other wilayas are under curfew from 7 pm to 7 am. However, the government is reinforcing lockdown measures over the Eid el Fitr holiday, projected to be on May 23-24 or May 24-25. The curfew will be extended from 1 pm until 7 am the following day in all provinces. All vehicular traffic during the two-day holiday is banned.

(Active cases: 7542)


MOZAMBIQUE


President Felipe Nyusi has also extended the state of emergency until Saturday, May 30, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Authorities have urged residents to stay home, except for essential reasons. The use of face masks is mandatory on public and private communal transport and at gatherings. Schools remain closed; cultural, recreational, and sports activities in public spaces remain prohibited. Entertainment establishments, including museums, theaters, libraries, bars, and gyms, are shut as a precautionary measure. Beaches are closed for leisure activities except for fishing. Authorities have also suspended religious services and celebrations at all places of worship. Markets will operate from 06:00 to 1700 (local time), subject to the approval of health authorities. Individuals who do not comply with the measures may be punished under criminal law. On Tuesday, May 12, Mozambique's Civil Aviation Authority extended the current suspension of all international flights until Sunday, May 31, to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). National Carrier LAM Mozambique Airlines continues to operate domestic flights and cargo flights are still permitted. Only Mozambican citizens or foreign residents can return to the country and will have to undergo a mandatory 14-day self-quarantine.

(Active cases: 156) 


GHANA

A month after Ghana lifted the coronavirus lockdown, the case count has surpassed 6000 mark. The tallies showed that four regions had recorded increases: Greater Accra, Ashanti, Western and Central Regions. The president announced that, “despite its disruption to everyday life, it must not hinder lives and economy of the country. The virus is here but we must find a way to live with it with self-discipline and protocols. Now, essential, and non-essential businesses are now allowed to open while wearing of masks. All vehicles undertaking intracity travel like trotros, taxis, and busses are advised to reduce their number of passengers to observe social distancing, all businesses and supermarkets will be enforcing social distancing measures while schools will remain completely closed. President announced the extension of the closure of the country's international borders till May 31, the measure also affects international commercial flights, which will not operate over this period. Citizens returning from abroad and foreign nationals with Ghanaian residence permits will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine period if they show symptoms of the virus. The domestic flights in Ghana resumed from May 1 with precautionary measures, such as safe distancing.

(Active cases: 6269) 


UGANDA

Kampala lockdown is scheduled to be lifted on 3rd June. Uganda banned the use of public and private transport in late March to curb the spread of COVID-19.??? With the ban on cars, the country has seen a boom in demand for bicycles.??? Uganda’s March lockdown to curb the virus included a ban on motor vehicles — both public and private — for nonessential personnel. Uganda has suspended all its international flight until further notice.

(Active cases: 264)


KENYA


As Kenya continues to report more cases of Covid-19, the government nonetheless says it is making progress in containing further spread of the virus. In a virtual address at the 73rd World Health Assembly, Health Minister Mutahi Kagwe said that the country was "making significant and steady progress" towards flattening the curve. Last Friday May 15, President Uhuru Kenyatta extended the lockdown by another 21 days owing to the rise of new infections. Borders are shut and flights are restricted. No travel to or from the capital Nairobi and parts of the city's neighboring counties. Such measures also apply to some coastal counties.

(Active cases: 1029)


MOROCCO


Morocco is to extend its national lockdown to contain the spread of the new coronavirus until June 10, Prime Minister Saad Dine El Otmani said on Monday, as the rise of hotspots within families and factories complicates efforts to curb infections people are only allowed to go out to buy food or medicine, and to staff some key jobs. Schools, mosques, non-essential shops, and all entertainment venues have been closed. Morocco has made wearing masks mandatory, with those who fail to do so at risk of being fined or jailed. Morocco suspended day all international passenger flights to and from its airports as a protective measure against the spread of coronavirus.

(Active cases: 7133) 


LIBYA


The Government announced on Thursday, April 23, that the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) curfew will be modified and the new curfew was implemented on Monday, April 27, that from 18:00 to 06:00 (local time), and individuals are permitted to operate vehicles which was banned during the previous curfew. All mosques, schools, restaurants, wedding halls, parks, and shops are also closed as a precaution. Areas under control of the House of Representatives (HoR) have a curfew from 18:00 to 06:00 during Ramadan. It is unclear as to how long the measure will remain in place. Land and sea border crossing points within GNA territory were closed.

(Active cases: 69) 


RWANDA


Rwanda has loosened restrictions after 45 days of coronavirus lockdown. Markets will open for essential vendors not exceeding 50% of registered traders. Hotels and restaurants will open and close by 7 p.m., but meetings in public spaces and mass gatherings are prohibited Under the new guidelines, the government announced a curfew from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. Borders will also remain closed except for cargo as well as returning Rwandans and legal citizens, who will be subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. The new guidelines restrict funeral gatherings to not more than 30 people, while public and private transport between different provinces and the city of Kigali is not permitted. Schools will remain closed until September as well as places of worship, bars and recreation centers.

(Active cases: 314)


ETHIOPIA


Ethiopia is reluctant to initiate a strict lockdown, which the World Health Organization recommends helping to slow down the spread of the virus. All operations that are now allowed per law must be conducted within strict limits of social distancing and observance of other COVID-19 prevention protocols. The state was also the first to get a testing center. Ethiopia is currently under a five-month state of emergency declared earlier this month to fight the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Ethiopian Airlines has suspended flights due to this pandemic.  

(Active cases: 389) 


SENEGAL


Coronavirus restrictions will be eased in Senegal, President Macky Sall said late on Monday, with night-time curfews shortened and mosques reopened. He said the COVID-19 disease would continue to circulate for at least another three months even under the best-case scenario. Under the new rules, curfews will run from 9:00 pm to 5:00 am, shaving two hours off the current restrictions. Mosques will be reopened for prayers during the holy month of Ramadan, and churches will also be allowed to accept worshippers. Markets and businesses, which have only been allowed to open a few days a week during the lockdown, will now only need to be closed for a day's cleaning each week. Restrictions imposed on public transport will also be eased, though schools will not begin reopening until next month.

(Active cases: 2103)


SOMALIA


On Monday, April 13, General Abdi Hassan Mohamed Hajar, Somali commander of police, announced that a nighttime curfew would be implemented in Mogadishu for an indefinite period from Wednesday, April 15 to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The nightly curfew will be in effect between 20:00 and 05:00 (local time). Also, all international flights to and from Somalia are indefinitely suspended.

(Active cases: 1573) 

Related Keyphrases:

COVID 19 cases crosses 6000 | COVID 19 active cases | flights remains suspended till May | international borders till May 31 | Cross border public passenger services | international passenger flights | International commercial flights | coronavirus cases | international flights | Social distancing measures remain | public spaces remain prohibited | coronavirus lockdown | systematic quarantine measures | Mandatory quarantine measures | operate domestic flights

Major African countries update regarding COVID 19 active cases and lockdown status as of May 8th:


Confirmed cases = 51,549

Number of deaths = 2,006

Recoveries = 17,634

Infected countries = 53

Virus-free countries = 1 (Lesotho)


KEY HIGHLIGHTS this week


  • Nigeria - Nigeria has reopened with a curfew between 8:00 pm to 6:00 am. 
  • Kenya - The government announced a partial lockdown on two virus hotspots, Eastleigh in Nairobi and Mombasa city. Kenya Airways has announced plans to repatriate citizens from three global cities. (Mumbai, Guangzhou, London)
  • Uganda - Last Monday the government has relaxed restrictions on several non-essential businesses amid ongoing COVID-19 lockdown.  
  • South Africa- A slight easing of the nationwide lockdown with a curfew from 08:00 pm to 05:00 am. 
  • Ghana - Ghana lifted lockdown in its two major cities-Accra & Kumasi. International flights remain suspended till May 31st, domestic flights resumed from May 1st.



Detailed updates are as below:


NIGERIA


In Nigeria, some businesses have reopened on the first working day after the easing of a lockdown imposed on key urban areas in a bid to restart Africa's largest economy. A ban on large gatherings is still in place and there is a curfew between 08:00 pm and 06:00 am. In Lagos, offices have been told to shut by 03:00 pm while commercial buses must reduce passengers’ numbers to maintain social distance. But some have expressed concerns that the government's decision to ease restrictions has been premature as the number of new coronavirus cases does not appear to be tailing off. As President Buhari said, Nigeria does not have the resources for a long-term lockdown. This is a tussle between saving Nigeria's fragile economy and an ailing health sector battling a deadly virus.

(Active cases: 1728)


KENYA


The government announced a partial lockdown on two virus hotspots, Eastleigh in Nairobi and Mombasa City. The 15-day measure took effect same day starting 7pm local time. Under the measure, there shall be no movement into and out of the places. All public places in the two areas are to be shutdown. The cases tally for the two areas stood at 68 and 64 respectively. Nairobi and Mombasa have been previously placed under similar measure being the most impacted counties. Kenya Airways has announced plans to repatriate citizens from three global cities. The national carrier announced the special repatriation flights via social media handles. The first is from London (May 4th), Mumbai (May 7th) and finally from Guangzhou (May 8th). “Only Kenyan Citizens with COVID-19 test results will board,” Kenya airways clarified. According to a statement posted on their website, passengers will pay a one-way nonrefundable fare. All passengers must arrange their own COVID-19 tests and present proof of a negative result as part of formalities.

(Active cases: 607)


SOUTH AFRICA

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has announced on April 22nd, a slight easing of the nationwide lockdown that has been in place since March 27. Starting from May 1st, the lockdown moved from the current level 5 to level 4, the wearing of face masks in public is mandatory under new regulations. Other measures under Level 4 includes a curfew from 20:00 to 05:00 (local time), a ban on travel across provincial borders without proof of employment or for other essential purposes, a limit of three people per private vehicle, and taxis must operate at 70 percent capacity or below. Restaurants are only allowed to provide delivery services and some retailers can reopen, including clothes shops, hardware stores, and wholesalers. The agricultural sector is permitted to resume full operations and mining can partially resume. Businesses resuming operations have to comply with certain health regulations, such as set workforce capacities, providing hand sanitizers, and ensuring social distance is maintained.

(Active cases: 7808) 


SENEGAL


In Senegal, President Macky Sall declared a state of health emergency on March 23 a curfew is imposed between 8 pm and 6 am, during which the population is forbidden to roam the streets. The lockdown is therefore limited to certain hours only. Senegal's Minister of Tourism and Air Transport, Alioune Sarr, announced that all international flights to the country will remain suspended until Monday, June 1. Cargo flights, medical evacuations, and specially authorized flights are exempt from the restriction.

(Active cases: 1433)


UGANDA


Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni on Monday relaxed restrictions on several non-essential businesses amid ongoing COVID-19 lockdown.  Addressing the nation from the state house, Museveni praised his country for "successfully" limiting the spread of the disease. The lockdown has been in place for the last 45 days. "Since food and essential goods shops operate, there is need to let wholesale dealers to operate," said Museveni. Hardware shops, garages, metal works, woodworks, insurance providers and about 30 lawyers should operate, he said.  Uganda has suspended all its international flight until further notice.

(Active cases: 100)


ETHIOPIA


Ethiopia is reluctant to initiate a strict lockdown, which the World Health Organization recommends helping to slow down the spread of the virus. All operations that are now allowed per law must be conducted within strict limits of social distancing and observance of other COVID-19 prevention protocols. The state was also the first to get a testing center. Ethiopia is currently under a five-month state of emergency declared earlier this month to fight the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Ethiopian Airlines has suspended flights due to this pandemic.  

(Active cases: 162) 


MOROCCO


Morocco is to extend its national lockdown to contain the spread of coronavirus until May 20. Lockdown measures imposed on March 20 mean people are only allowed to go out to buy food or medicine, and to staff some key jobs. Schools, mosques, non-essential shops, and all entertainment venues have been closed. Morocco has made wearing masks mandatory, with those who fail to do so at risk of being fined or jailed. Morocco suspended day all international passenger flights to and from its airports as a protective measure against the spread of coronavirus.

(Active cases: 5408) 


ALGERIA


Algeria has taken further steps to ease restrictions over the novel coronavirus by allowing several businesses to reopen "to reduce the economic and social impact of the health crisis" caused by the pandemic, the prime minister's office said on last week. It said shops to be reopened including those for materials for building and public works, appliances, fabrics, jewelry, clothing and shoes, cosmetics and perfumes, home and office furniture, pastries, and hairdressers in addition to urban transport by taxi. Algeria has said restrictions linked to the novel coronavirus has significantly hit the economy which is under financial pressure due to a sharp fall in global oil prices.

(Active cases: 4997)


RWANDA


Rwanda has loosened restrictions after 45 days of coronavirus lockdown, even though a nationwide night-time curfew will be enforced and movement in and out of the capital, Kigali, is prohibited. Roads in Kigali were busy again, in a city considered to be a hotspot for infections. People were seen adhering to mandatory wearing of face masks and social distancing.

(Active cases: 268)


GAMBIA


Gambia’s National Assembly voted on Friday, April 3, to extend the current State of Emergency for another 45 days. Under the State of Emergency, all bars, casinos, cinemas, event halls, gyms, night club, public swimming pools, and other non-essential businesses are closed. Restaurants are allowed to operate but only sell food for customers to take away. Additionally, all public gatherings, including open markets are suspended, along with school and university classes. Police officers will be deployed to enforce all regulations. All flights, except for medical cargo flights, are suspended since March 23, 2020.

(Active cases: 17) 


ANGOLA

On Thursday, April 23, Angola's National Assembly announced that the current nationwide state of emergency will be extended until Sunday, May 10, to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. This is the second time the government has extended the state of emergency since it was initially imposed on March 27. Also, the Government officials announced that all international flights to and from Angola will be suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 36) 


GHANA

After three weeks, Ghana lifted the coronavirus lockdown in its two biggest cities, Accra and Kumasi on Monday April 20th. A lockdown of the two worst affected metropolitan areas had been in place since March 30, 2020. However, non-essential businesses also will now be allowed to open while wearing of masks. But there are still bans on large gatherings and schools will remain closed. On Friday, May 1, President announced the extension of the closure of the country's international borders till May 31, the measure also affects international commercial flights, which will not operate over this period. Citizens returning from abroad and foreign nationals with Ghanaian residence permits will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine period if they show symptoms of the virus. The domestic flights in Ghana resumed from May 1 with precautionary measures, such as safe distancing.

(Active cases: 3091) 


ZAMBIA

Zambia‘s president Edgar Lungu announced the government wouldn’t close its borders unlike other Sub-Saharan nations, as this would lead to an economic meltdown. In addition, he suspended all international flights except those landing and departing from Kenneth Kaunda International Airport in the capital, Lusaka. He has also ordered the closure of gyms, bars, casinos and night clubs. Yet, “essential businesses dealing in goods and services will be kept running”.

(Active cases: 146) 


MALAWI

Malawi Health Minister has declared a 21-day lockdown that came into effect at midnight on April 18th and runs till midnight on May 9th. The Malawi Department of Civil Aviation announced that all international flights to and from Malawi will be suspended until further notice

(Active cases: 43) 


TANZANIA

On April 12, the Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority announced a suspension of all international passenger flights due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Cargo flights are exempt from the suspension, but crew members will be quarantined at government facilities during their stay. President John Magufuli has announced that the country will not be closing its borders due to humanitarian concerns, as the closure would impact land-locked countries in the region dependent on its ports. 

(Active cases: 480) 


LIBYA


It has enforced a nationwide curfew from 2pm to 7am and prohibited intercity travel on April 23, that the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) curfew will be modified. The new curfew will be implemented on Monday, April 27, and will run from 18:00 to 06:00 (local time), and individuals will be permitted to operate vehicles, banned during the previous curfew. It is unclear as to how long the measure will remain in place.

(Active cases: 64) 


SOMALIA


On Monday, April 13, General Abdi Hassan Mohamed Hajar, Somali commander of police, announced that a nighttime curfew would be implemented in Mogadishu for an indefinite period from Wednesday, April 15, to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The nightly curfew will be in effect between 20:00 and 05:00 (local time). Also, all international flights to and from Somalia are indefinitely suspended.

(Active cases: 873) 


MOZAMBIQUE


President Felipe Nyusi announced a 30-day extension to the state of emergency until May 30, due to the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. All the international flights remain suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 81) 




                                                        




Description:

Major African countries update regarding COVID 19 active cases and lockdown status as of May 8th:


Confirmed cases = 51,549

Number of deaths = 2,006

Recoveries = 17,634

Infected countries = 53

Virus-free countries = 1 (Lesotho)


KEY HIGHLIGHTS this week


  • Nigeria - Nigeria has reopened with a curfew between 8:00 pm to 6:00 am. 
  • Kenya - The government announced a partial lockdown on two virus hotspots, Eastleigh in Nairobi and Mombasa city. Kenya Airways has announced plans to repatriate citizens from three global cities. (Mumbai, Guangzhou, London)
  • Uganda - Last Monday the government has relaxed restrictions on several non-essential businesses amid ongoing COVID-19 lockdown.  
  • South Africa- A slight easing of the nationwide lockdown with a curfew from 08:00 pm to 05:00 am. 
  • Ghana - Ghana lifted lockdown in its two major cities-Accra & Kumasi. International flights remain suspended till May 31st, domestic flights resumed from May 1st.



Detailed updates are as below:


NIGERIA


In Nigeria, some businesses have reopened on the first working day after the easing of a lockdown imposed on key urban areas in a bid to restart Africa's largest economy. A ban on large gatherings is still in place and there is a curfew between 08:00 pm and 06:00 am. In Lagos, offices have been told to shut by 03:00 pm while commercial buses must reduce passengers’ numbers to maintain social distance. But some have expressed concerns that the government's decision to ease restrictions has been premature as the number of new coronavirus cases does not appear to be tailing off. As President Buhari said, Nigeria does not have the resources for a long-term lockdown. This is a tussle between saving Nigeria's fragile economy and an ailing health sector battling a deadly virus.

(Active cases: 1728)


KENYA


The government announced a partial lockdown on two virus hotspots, Eastleigh in Nairobi and Mombasa City. The 15-day measure took effect same day starting 7pm local time. Under the measure, there shall be no movement into and out of the places. All public places in the two areas are to be shutdown. The cases tally for the two areas stood at 68 and 64 respectively. Nairobi and Mombasa have been previously placed under similar measure being the most impacted counties. Kenya Airways has announced plans to repatriate citizens from three global cities. The national carrier announced the special repatriation flights via social media handles. The first is from London (May 4th), Mumbai (May 7th) and finally from Guangzhou (May 8th). “Only Kenyan Citizens with COVID-19 test results will board,” Kenya airways clarified. According to a statement posted on their website, passengers will pay a one-way nonrefundable fare. All passengers must arrange their own COVID-19 tests and present proof of a negative result as part of formalities.

(Active cases: 607)


SOUTH AFRICA

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has announced on April 22nd, a slight easing of the nationwide lockdown that has been in place since March 27. Starting from May 1st, the lockdown moved from the current level 5 to level 4, the wearing of face masks in public is mandatory under new regulations. Other measures under Level 4 includes a curfew from 20:00 to 05:00 (local time), a ban on travel across provincial borders without proof of employment or for other essential purposes, a limit of three people per private vehicle, and taxis must operate at 70 percent capacity or below. Restaurants are only allowed to provide delivery services and some retailers can reopen, including clothes shops, hardware stores, and wholesalers. The agricultural sector is permitted to resume full operations and mining can partially resume. Businesses resuming operations have to comply with certain health regulations, such as set workforce capacities, providing hand sanitizers, and ensuring social distance is maintained.

(Active cases: 7808) 


SENEGAL


In Senegal, President Macky Sall declared a state of health emergency on March 23 a curfew is imposed between 8 pm and 6 am, during which the population is forbidden to roam the streets. The lockdown is therefore limited to certain hours only. Senegal's Minister of Tourism and Air Transport, Alioune Sarr, announced that all international flights to the country will remain suspended until Monday, June 1. Cargo flights, medical evacuations, and specially authorized flights are exempt from the restriction.

(Active cases: 1433)


UGANDA


Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni on Monday relaxed restrictions on several non-essential businesses amid ongoing COVID-19 lockdown.  Addressing the nation from the state house, Museveni praised his country for "successfully" limiting the spread of the disease. The lockdown has been in place for the last 45 days. "Since food and essential goods shops operate, there is need to let wholesale dealers to operate," said Museveni. Hardware shops, garages, metal works, woodworks, insurance providers and about 30 lawyers should operate, he said.  Uganda has suspended all its international flight until further notice.

(Active cases: 100)


ETHIOPIA


Ethiopia is reluctant to initiate a strict lockdown, which the World Health Organization recommends helping to slow down the spread of the virus. All operations that are now allowed per law must be conducted within strict limits of social distancing and observance of other COVID-19 prevention protocols. The state was also the first to get a testing center. Ethiopia is currently under a five-month state of emergency declared earlier this month to fight the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Ethiopian Airlines has suspended flights due to this pandemic.  

(Active cases: 162) 


MOROCCO


Morocco is to extend its national lockdown to contain the spread of coronavirus until May 20. Lockdown measures imposed on March 20 mean people are only allowed to go out to buy food or medicine, and to staff some key jobs. Schools, mosques, non-essential shops, and all entertainment venues have been closed. Morocco has made wearing masks mandatory, with those who fail to do so at risk of being fined or jailed. Morocco suspended day all international passenger flights to and from its airports as a protective measure against the spread of coronavirus.

(Active cases: 5408) 


ALGERIA


Algeria has taken further steps to ease restrictions over the novel coronavirus by allowing several businesses to reopen "to reduce the economic and social impact of the health crisis" caused by the pandemic, the prime minister's office said on last week. It said shops to be reopened including those for materials for building and public works, appliances, fabrics, jewelry, clothing and shoes, cosmetics and perfumes, home and office furniture, pastries, and hairdressers in addition to urban transport by taxi. Algeria has said restrictions linked to the novel coronavirus has significantly hit the economy which is under financial pressure due to a sharp fall in global oil prices.

(Active cases: 4997)


RWANDA


Rwanda has loosened restrictions after 45 days of coronavirus lockdown, even though a nationwide night-time curfew will be enforced and movement in and out of the capital, Kigali, is prohibited. Roads in Kigali were busy again, in a city considered to be a hotspot for infections. People were seen adhering to mandatory wearing of face masks and social distancing.

(Active cases: 268)


GAMBIA


Gambia’s National Assembly voted on Friday, April 3, to extend the current State of Emergency for another 45 days. Under the State of Emergency, all bars, casinos, cinemas, event halls, gyms, night club, public swimming pools, and other non-essential businesses are closed. Restaurants are allowed to operate but only sell food for customers to take away. Additionally, all public gatherings, including open markets are suspended, along with school and university classes. Police officers will be deployed to enforce all regulations. All flights, except for medical cargo flights, are suspended since March 23, 2020.

(Active cases: 17) 


ANGOLA

On Thursday, April 23, Angola's National Assembly announced that the current nationwide state of emergency will be extended until Sunday, May 10, to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. This is the second time the government has extended the state of emergency since it was initially imposed on March 27. Also, the Government officials announced that all international flights to and from Angola will be suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 36) 


GHANA

After three weeks, Ghana lifted the coronavirus lockdown in its two biggest cities, Accra and Kumasi on Monday April 20th. A lockdown of the two worst affected metropolitan areas had been in place since March 30, 2020. However, non-essential businesses also will now be allowed to open while wearing of masks. But there are still bans on large gatherings and schools will remain closed. On Friday, May 1, President announced the extension of the closure of the country's international borders till May 31, the measure also affects international commercial flights, which will not operate over this period. Citizens returning from abroad and foreign nationals with Ghanaian residence permits will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine period if they show symptoms of the virus. The domestic flights in Ghana resumed from May 1 with precautionary measures, such as safe distancing.

(Active cases: 3091) 


ZAMBIA

Zambia‘s president Edgar Lungu announced the government wouldn’t close its borders unlike other Sub-Saharan nations, as this would lead to an economic meltdown. In addition, he suspended all international flights except those landing and departing from Kenneth Kaunda International Airport in the capital, Lusaka. He has also ordered the closure of gyms, bars, casinos and night clubs. Yet, “essential businesses dealing in goods and services will be kept running”.

(Active cases: 146) 


MALAWI

Malawi Health Minister has declared a 21-day lockdown that came into effect at midnight on April 18th and runs till midnight on May 9th. The Malawi Department of Civil Aviation announced that all international flights to and from Malawi will be suspended until further notice

(Active cases: 43) 


TANZANIA

On April 12, the Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority announced a suspension of all international passenger flights due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Cargo flights are exempt from the suspension, but crew members will be quarantined at government facilities during their stay. President John Magufuli has announced that the country will not be closing its borders due to humanitarian concerns, as the closure would impact land-locked countries in the region dependent on its ports. 

(Active cases: 480) 


LIBYA


It has enforced a nationwide curfew from 2pm to 7am and prohibited intercity travel on April 23, that the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) curfew will be modified. The new curfew will be implemented on Monday, April 27, and will run from 18:00 to 06:00 (local time), and individuals will be permitted to operate vehicles, banned during the previous curfew. It is unclear as to how long the measure will remain in place.

(Active cases: 64) 


SOMALIA


On Monday, April 13, General Abdi Hassan Mohamed Hajar, Somali commander of police, announced that a nighttime curfew would be implemented in Mogadishu for an indefinite period from Wednesday, April 15, to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The nightly curfew will be in effect between 20:00 and 05:00 (local time). Also, all international flights to and from Somalia are indefinitely suspended.

(Active cases: 873) 


MOZAMBIQUE


President Felipe Nyusi announced a 30-day extension to the state of emergency until May 30, due to the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. All the international flights remain suspended until further notice.

(Active cases: 81) 




                                                        




Related Keyphrases:

international passenger flights due | COVID 19 active cases | international commercial flights | international borders till May 31 | new coronavirus cases | coronavirus lockdown | special repatriation flights | suspended flights due | International flights | medical cargo flights | essential goods shops operate | African President Cyril Ramaphosa | suspended till May 31st | nationwide lockdown

Capital City

Nairobi

Currency

Kenyan shilling (KES)

(1 AOA = 0.72 INR)

(1 KES  = 0.0095 USD)

President

Uhuru Kenyatta

Official language

Swahili

Government

President System

Population

51 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Kenya is 02.30 hours behind India








Capital City- Nairobi: Nairobi is the capital and the largest city of Kenya. The City of Nairobi enjoys the status of a full administrative County. The Nairobi province differs in several ways from other Kenyan regions. The county is entirely urban. One of the Africa’s largest stock exchange Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) is in Nairobi. Nairobi is the regional headquarters of several international companies and organisations. General ElectricYoung & Rubicam, Google, Coca-ColaIBM Services, and Cisco Systems relocated their African headquarters to the city. The United Nations Office at Nairobi hosts UN Environment and UN-Habitat headquarters.

Cultural and Social Environment: Kenya is a multilingual country. Although the official languages are Swahili and English, there are a total of 62 languages spoken in the country. Kenya is not a homogeneous country ethnicity wise. Around 13% of the population are of non-African descent, i.e. Indian, Arab and European. The country has temples, church, mosques built at various locations. It has 60 national parks and game reserves for outdoor activities. 

Educational Facilities: Kenya’s education system has undergone significant changes over time and was previously influenced heavily by the British during the colonial era. There is a good range of international schools in Kenya, especially in the capital, Nairobi. Expats living in Kenya will find that because of the country's historical links with the UK, there's many schools that follow the British curriculum. There are also schools offering the globally recognised International Baccalaureate or the curricula of countries such as France, Germany, Sweden, America and the Netherlands

Medical Facilities: In recent years the country’s healthcare system has seen dramatic improvements, but there are still several issues to be mindful of when considering healthcare options in Kenya.

Major Industries: The industrial activities are concentrated around 3 largest urban centers of Nairobi, Mombasa & Kisumu and is dominated by food-processing industries such as grain milling, beer production, sugarcane crushing, and the fabrication of consumer goods, Cement, building material & Oil refinery.

There has been constant rise of Fintech, Micro finance and Renewable Energy companies in Kenya.

Tourism in Kenya is the second-largest source of foreign exchange revenue following agriculture.

Agriculture is the second largest contributor to Kenya's Kenya’s GDP. Tea, coffee, sisal, pyrethrum, corn, and wheat are grown in the fertile highlands.  Coconutspineapplescashew nuts, cotton, sugarcanesisal, and corn are grown in the lower-lying areas. Kenya is 3rd largest exporter of cut flowers.

Political Environment: Kenya has made significant political, structural and economic reforms that have largely driven sustained economic growth, social development and political gains over the past decade. Kenya has the potential to be one of Africa’s success stories from its growing youthful population, a dynamic private sector, highly skilled workforce, improved infrastructure, a new constitution, and its pivotal role in East Africa.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Kenya offers ample amount of job opportunities to the expat in various. The report indicated that the highest salary bracket in the NGO sector is heavily dominated by expatriates. The average cost of living for expats in Kenya is USD 2500 per month.









Description:

Capital City

Nairobi

Currency

Kenyan shilling (KES)

(1 AOA = 0.72 INR)

(1 KES  = 0.0095 USD)

President

Uhuru Kenyatta

Official language

Swahili

Government

President System

Population

51 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Kenya is 02.30 hours behind India








Capital City- Nairobi: Nairobi is the capital and the largest city of Kenya. The City of Nairobi enjoys the status of a full administrative County. The Nairobi province differs in several ways from other Kenyan regions. The county is entirely urban. One of the Africa’s largest stock exchange Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) is in Nairobi. Nairobi is the regional headquarters of several international companies and organisations. General ElectricYoung & Rubicam, Google, Coca-ColaIBM Services, and Cisco Systems relocated their African headquarters to the city. The United Nations Office at Nairobi hosts UN Environment and UN-Habitat headquarters.

Cultural and Social Environment: Kenya is a multilingual country. Although the official languages are Swahili and English, there are a total of 62 languages spoken in the country. Kenya is not a homogeneous country ethnicity wise. Around 13% of the population are of non-African descent, i.e. Indian, Arab and European. The country has temples, church, mosques built at various locations. It has 60 national parks and game reserves for outdoor activities. 

Educational Facilities: Kenya’s education system has undergone significant changes over time and was previously influenced heavily by the British during the colonial era. There is a good range of international schools in Kenya, especially in the capital, Nairobi. Expats living in Kenya will find that because of the country's historical links with the UK, there's many schools that follow the British curriculum. There are also schools offering the globally recognised International Baccalaureate or the curricula of countries such as France, Germany, Sweden, America and the Netherlands

Medical Facilities: In recent years the country’s healthcare system has seen dramatic improvements, but there are still several issues to be mindful of when considering healthcare options in Kenya.

Major Industries: The industrial activities are concentrated around 3 largest urban centers of Nairobi, Mombasa & Kisumu and is dominated by food-processing industries such as grain milling, beer production, sugarcane crushing, and the fabrication of consumer goods, Cement, building material & Oil refinery.

There has been constant rise of Fintech, Micro finance and Renewable Energy companies in Kenya.

Tourism in Kenya is the second-largest source of foreign exchange revenue following agriculture.

Agriculture is the second largest contributor to Kenya's Kenya’s GDP. Tea, coffee, sisal, pyrethrum, corn, and wheat are grown in the fertile highlands.  Coconutspineapplescashew nuts, cotton, sugarcanesisal, and corn are grown in the lower-lying areas. Kenya is 3rd largest exporter of cut flowers.

Political Environment: Kenya has made significant political, structural and economic reforms that have largely driven sustained economic growth, social development and political gains over the past decade. Kenya has the potential to be one of Africa’s success stories from its growing youthful population, a dynamic private sector, highly skilled workforce, improved infrastructure, a new constitution, and its pivotal role in East Africa.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Kenya offers ample amount of job opportunities to the expat in various. The report indicated that the highest salary bracket in the NGO sector is heavily dominated by expatriates. The average cost of living for expats in Kenya is USD 2500 per month.









Related Keyphrases:

stock exchange Nairobi Securities Exchange | several international companies | homogeneous country ethnicity | Nairobi province differs | undergone significant changes | International Baccalaureate | Renewable Energy companies | sustained economic growth | s healthcare system | full administrative County | foreign exchange revenue | multilingual country | s education system | international schools | significant political

Capital City

Abuja

Currency

Naira

1 USD =365 NGN

1 INR = 5.0484 NGN

President

Muhammadu Buhari

Official language

Hausa, Igbo, Yoruba

Government

Federal presidential constitutional republic

Population

204,630,242

Time Difference to India

4:30 hours behind India









Capital City- 

The national capital is Abuja, in the Federal Capital Territory, which was created by in 1976. Lagos, the former capital, retains its standing as the country’s leading commercial and industrial city. Abuja was chosen for Nigeria’s new capital because of its central location, easy accessibility, salubrious climate, and low population density and the availability of land for future expansion. It was the first planned city to be built in Nigeria. Abuja lies at 1,180 feet (360 meters) above sea level and has a cooler climate and less humidity than is found in Lagos.

Cultural and Social Environment: 

Nigeria’s vibrant popular culture reflects great changes in inherited traditions and adaptations of imported ones. Establishments serving alcoholic beverages are found everywhere except where Islamic laws prohibit them. Hotels and nightclubs are part of the landscape of the larger cities. Movie theatres, showing mostly Indian and American films, are popular among the urban middle- and low-income groups. Radio, television, and other forms of home entertainment (e.g., recorded music and movies) have also grown in popularity, though their use is dependent on the availability of electricity. 

Nigeria has a rich artistic heritage, including both traditional and contemporary art forms. From the naturalistic statues produced at Ife to the bronzes made for the king of Benin, Nigerian artists have crafted art that is world famous. Music and dance are integral to Nigerian culture, and each ethnic group has its own specialties. Traditional instruments include various types of flutes, trumpets, musical bows, xylophones, and wooden clappers, as well as many varieties of drums.

 Educational Facilities: 

Many international school options are in Nigeria's major urban centers, namely the capital city of Abuja and the commercial capital of Lagos. As expected, rural areas are unable to support the same type of provision; expat parents living far from a large city may want to consider homeschooling or sending their child to a boarding school. Most international school curricula in Nigeria follow British, American or International Baccalaureate standards. The quality of education tends to be high, Many schools are equipped with state-of-the-art facilities and offer a healthy choice of extra-curricular activities. The school year in Nigeria runs from January to December and is divided into three semesters. The school day in Nigeria runs roughly between 8am and 3pm.

Medical Facilities: 

Health facilities in the country are limited and are below Western standards. Public healthcare is underfunded while private healthcare are adequate for routine treatments and check-ups. Expats are advised to secure health insurance that can cover or reimburse medical treatments including medical evacuation. Malaria, HIV and tuberculosis are prevailing problems in the country. Foreigners are urged to get precautionary vaccinations, including for the Hepatitis strains, typhoid, rubella and meningitis.

Major Industries: 

The Nigerian economy is one of the largest in Africa initially, primarily on the petroleum industry. A series of world oil price increases from 1973 produced rapid economic growth in transportation, construction, manufacturing, and government services. This led to a great influx of rural people into the larger urban centres, agricultural production stagnated to such an extent that cash crops such as palm oil, peanuts (groundnuts), and cotton were no longer significant export commodities.  The federal government has established such capital-intensive industries as steel mills, pulp and paper mills, petrochemical plants, and an aluminum smelter. In the past, large-scale manufacturing—dominated by the production of textiles, tobacco, beverages, and cement—was controlled by foreign investors.


Description:

Capital City

Abuja

Currency

Naira

1 USD =365 NGN

1 INR = 5.0484 NGN

President

Muhammadu Buhari

Official language

Hausa, Igbo, Yoruba

Government

Federal presidential constitutional republic

Population

204,630,242

Time Difference to India

4:30 hours behind India









Capital City- 

The national capital is Abuja, in the Federal Capital Territory, which was created by in 1976. Lagos, the former capital, retains its standing as the country’s leading commercial and industrial city. Abuja was chosen for Nigeria’s new capital because of its central location, easy accessibility, salubrious climate, and low population density and the availability of land for future expansion. It was the first planned city to be built in Nigeria. Abuja lies at 1,180 feet (360 meters) above sea level and has a cooler climate and less humidity than is found in Lagos.

Cultural and Social Environment: 

Nigeria’s vibrant popular culture reflects great changes in inherited traditions and adaptations of imported ones. Establishments serving alcoholic beverages are found everywhere except where Islamic laws prohibit them. Hotels and nightclubs are part of the landscape of the larger cities. Movie theatres, showing mostly Indian and American films, are popular among the urban middle- and low-income groups. Radio, television, and other forms of home entertainment (e.g., recorded music and movies) have also grown in popularity, though their use is dependent on the availability of electricity. 

Nigeria has a rich artistic heritage, including both traditional and contemporary art forms. From the naturalistic statues produced at Ife to the bronzes made for the king of Benin, Nigerian artists have crafted art that is world famous. Music and dance are integral to Nigerian culture, and each ethnic group has its own specialties. Traditional instruments include various types of flutes, trumpets, musical bows, xylophones, and wooden clappers, as well as many varieties of drums.

 Educational Facilities: 

Many international school options are in Nigeria's major urban centers, namely the capital city of Abuja and the commercial capital of Lagos. As expected, rural areas are unable to support the same type of provision; expat parents living far from a large city may want to consider homeschooling or sending their child to a boarding school. Most international school curricula in Nigeria follow British, American or International Baccalaureate standards. The quality of education tends to be high, Many schools are equipped with state-of-the-art facilities and offer a healthy choice of extra-curricular activities. The school year in Nigeria runs from January to December and is divided into three semesters. The school day in Nigeria runs roughly between 8am and 3pm.

Medical Facilities: 

Health facilities in the country are limited and are below Western standards. Public healthcare is underfunded while private healthcare are adequate for routine treatments and check-ups. Expats are advised to secure health insurance that can cover or reimburse medical treatments including medical evacuation. Malaria, HIV and tuberculosis are prevailing problems in the country. Foreigners are urged to get precautionary vaccinations, including for the Hepatitis strains, typhoid, rubella and meningitis.

Major Industries: 

The Nigerian economy is one of the largest in Africa initially, primarily on the petroleum industry. A series of world oil price increases from 1973 produced rapid economic growth in transportation, construction, manufacturing, and government services. This led to a great influx of rural people into the larger urban centres, agricultural production stagnated to such an extent that cash crops such as palm oil, peanuts (groundnuts), and cotton were no longer significant export commodities.  The federal government has established such capital-intensive industries as steel mills, pulp and paper mills, petrochemical plants, and an aluminum smelter. In the past, large-scale manufacturing—dominated by the production of textiles, tobacco, beverages, and cement—was controlled by foreign investors.


Related Keyphrases:

International Baccalaureate standards | international school curricula | international school options | significant export commodities | presidential constitutional | s vibrant popular culture | world oil price increases | precautionary vaccinations | Federal Capital Territory | agricultural production | contemporary art forms | commercial capital | Educational Facilities | low population density | Traditional instruments

Capital City

Dodoma

Currency

Tanzanian Shilling

(1 TZS = 0.033 INR)

(1 USD = 2300 TZS)

President

John Magufuli

Official language

Swahili, English, Arabic

Government

President System, Unitary, Republic

Population

56 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Tanzania is 02.30 hours behind India

Country code

+255










Capital City- Dodoma: Dodoma, being located in the centre of the country, is the capital of Tanzania. The population is primarily agricultural and is engaged in small-scale farming. Dodoma is a market centre for peanuts (groundnuts), castor beans, sunflower seeds, gum, corn (maize), rice, wheat, coffee, tea, tobacco, and sorghum. Coffee and sisal are cultivated in the northern part of the region, and cattle raising is important throughout the region. 

Largest City – Dar es Salaam: Dar es Salaam is the largest city in East Africa & industrial center of Tanzania being situated in the coastal region. It is the second busiest port in East Africa. It is the former capital of Tanzania. It is among one of the fastest growing cities in the world. 

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Tanzania has improved evidently and the crime rate is much lesser than the other African Countries. Politeness, respect and modesty are virtues that highly valued by Tanzanians. One can easily find Indian Supermarket, Indian Restaurants in Dar es Salaam. Indian expats can avail benefits of watching Indian channels by subscribing DTSV (cable service provider)

Educational Facilities: There are a number of international schools in Tanzania. Private primary schools are very few, and they are English medium and expensive. Also the quality of education of International and private schools is only good enough till primary.

Medical Facilities: The risk of catching a serious infectious disease is quite high so it is necessary to take proper medical precautions. Malaria-carrying mosquitoes is a major problem in Tanzania. The quality of local medical facilities in Tanzania is often well below the standard of those in Western countries. Most expats visit an expat health clinic in their city of residence when they are in need of medical care.

Major Industries: Tanzania’s economy is the 12th largest in Africa and the 2nd largest in East African community. The major industries in the country include agriculture, mining, and manufacturing among others. Agricultural activities in Tanzania involve coffee, sisal, cashew nuts and cotton as major export products. Mining is one of the country's main industries. Some of the exports are gold, tanzanite, diamonds

Political Environment: Tanzania has undergone impressive political and economic developments and improvements in social welfare in recent years. However, the country continues to face challenges, such as economic distribution, population growth and corruption. Growth rates have been remarkably stable over the last decade.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Tanzania is still a relatively poor country and a significant number of the population still live in poverty. Manufacturing, IT and tourism are some strong sectors in which expats can look for work. Apart from Tanzania’s economic centre Dar es Salaam, there are other cities preferred by expats. Arusha — also known as Tanzania’s diplomatic hub — is one of them. Also, there are opportunities in Tanzania in field of agriculture, manufacturing, mining.

Description:

Capital City

Dodoma

Currency

Tanzanian Shilling

(1 TZS = 0.033 INR)

(1 USD = 2300 TZS)

President

John Magufuli

Official language

Swahili, English, Arabic

Government

President System, Unitary, Republic

Population

56 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Tanzania is 02.30 hours behind India

Country code

+255










Capital City- Dodoma: Dodoma, being located in the centre of the country, is the capital of Tanzania. The population is primarily agricultural and is engaged in small-scale farming. Dodoma is a market centre for peanuts (groundnuts), castor beans, sunflower seeds, gum, corn (maize), rice, wheat, coffee, tea, tobacco, and sorghum. Coffee and sisal are cultivated in the northern part of the region, and cattle raising is important throughout the region. 

Largest City – Dar es Salaam: Dar es Salaam is the largest city in East Africa & industrial center of Tanzania being situated in the coastal region. It is the second busiest port in East Africa. It is the former capital of Tanzania. It is among one of the fastest growing cities in the world. 

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Tanzania has improved evidently and the crime rate is much lesser than the other African Countries. Politeness, respect and modesty are virtues that highly valued by Tanzanians. One can easily find Indian Supermarket, Indian Restaurants in Dar es Salaam. Indian expats can avail benefits of watching Indian channels by subscribing DTSV (cable service provider)

Educational Facilities: There are a number of international schools in Tanzania. Private primary schools are very few, and they are English medium and expensive. Also the quality of education of International and private schools is only good enough till primary.

Medical Facilities: The risk of catching a serious infectious disease is quite high so it is necessary to take proper medical precautions. Malaria-carrying mosquitoes is a major problem in Tanzania. The quality of local medical facilities in Tanzania is often well below the standard of those in Western countries. Most expats visit an expat health clinic in their city of residence when they are in need of medical care.

Major Industries: Tanzania’s economy is the 12th largest in Africa and the 2nd largest in East African community. The major industries in the country include agriculture, mining, and manufacturing among others. Agricultural activities in Tanzania involve coffee, sisal, cashew nuts and cotton as major export products. Mining is one of the country's main industries. Some of the exports are gold, tanzanite, diamonds

Political Environment: Tanzania has undergone impressive political and economic developments and improvements in social welfare in recent years. However, the country continues to face challenges, such as economic distribution, population growth and corruption. Growth rates have been remarkably stable over the last decade.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Tanzania is still a relatively poor country and a significant number of the population still live in poverty. Manufacturing, IT and tourism are some strong sectors in which expats can look for work. Apart from Tanzania’s economic centre Dar es Salaam, there are other cities preferred by expats. Arusha — also known as Tanzania’s diplomatic hub — is one of them. Also, there are opportunities in Tanzania in field of agriculture, manufacturing, mining.

Related Keyphrases:

s economic centre Dar es Salaam | undergone impressive political | proper medical precautions | Private primary schools | local medical facilities | serious infectious disease | East African community | international schools | Agricultural activities | economic distribution | major export products | economic developments | cable service provider | Tanzania

In our last article, we looked at how to manage your reputation through the recruitment process in order to attract better candidates.

A number of our clients are facing an equally difficult challenge as they resize their organisations to face new economic realities. How do you maintain your company reputation whilst downsizing?

Can a company fire well to hire well?

There are multiple internal and external company stakeholders to consider, as well as other interest parties such as competitors, regulators, etc. A poorly designed and executed retrenchment exercise can be tremendously damaging to the company's brand. On the other hand, companies who manage the process well can turn a potential liability into a long term asset.

Employees
We have seen various strategies used by companies to ensure that employees who are being let go continue to view the organisation positively and remain brand ambassadors for years to come. Apart from the financial compensation associated with redundancy, companies should also think about the other softer aspects associated with the retrenchment.

A common theme amongst all the strategies, is ensuring that there is a fair and transparent process to handle the employees’ exits. Some of the critical aspects of ensuring that the process is perceived to be fair are;

  1. Communication - One of the most critical aspects of handling the exit well is to have an effective communication process in place. Having a frank and honest conversation with the employees about the reasons for the retrenchment will go a long way to ensuring that trust is maintained.
  2. Timing – in the case of a redundancy or retrenchment exercise, giving an employee sufficient notice is vital to ensuring that they maintain some goodwill towards the company.
  3. Support – if at all possible, helping employees find alternate employment either through informal networks or where possible through outplacement services helps minimise the pain of the transition. Many companies also provide access to coaches to assist employees during their transition and help them get over the immediate shock of the retrenchment to focus on their next opportunity.

Outsiders
Managing the narrative with external stakeholders as well as the perception amongst consumers and competitors is equally important to handling a large retrenchment well.

Competitors will use the period of uncertainty created by the retrenchment to try and poach talent. Given the general uncertainty created within the organisation during a retrenchment exercise, employees are particularly vulnerable to an approach at this time, and it is important to ensure that the employees being retained are reassured during this time.

The image of the organisation amongst customers and the general public is also important to manage during the retrenchment process. For example, it may be better to have one significant round of retrenchments rather than multiple smaller rounds given the potential for bad news to keep circulating in the press.

We have assisted a number of organisations who have planned to downsize by engaging with the employees who are being let go to see if alternative roles can be found for them. Regardless of whether these efforts bear fruit, these initiatives have helped maintain the organisation’s brand and eventually allowed them to continue to attract good talent despite their short term challenges.

If you find yourself facing these challenges, please feel free to reach out and we can discuss how we may be able to help.



This article is written by Nikunj Shah, former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder of Select Global Solutions. 

Select Global Solutions provide Executive Search and Recruitment services to clients across Africa, India and the Middle East. Over the last 10 years we have developed an expertise in multi-cultural recruitment of senior talent across multiple industries. We specialise in sourcing both expatriates and nationals. To find out more about our talent acquisition solutions, get in touch with us at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Description:

In our last article, we looked at how to manage your reputation through the recruitment process in order to attract better candidates.

A number of our clients are facing an equally difficult challenge as they resize their organisations to face new economic realities. How do you maintain your company reputation whilst downsizing?

Can a company fire well to hire well?

There are multiple internal and external company stakeholders to consider, as well as other interest parties such as competitors, regulators, etc. A poorly designed and executed retrenchment exercise can be tremendously damaging to the company's brand. On the other hand, companies who manage the process well can turn a potential liability into a long term asset.

Employees
We have seen various strategies used by companies to ensure that employees who are being let go continue to view the organisation positively and remain brand ambassadors for years to come. Apart from the financial compensation associated with redundancy, companies should also think about the other softer aspects associated with the retrenchment.

A common theme amongst all the strategies, is ensuring that there is a fair and transparent process to handle the employees’ exits. Some of the critical aspects of ensuring that the process is perceived to be fair are;

  1. Communication - One of the most critical aspects of handling the exit well is to have an effective communication process in place. Having a frank and honest conversation with the employees about the reasons for the retrenchment will go a long way to ensuring that trust is maintained.
  2. Timing – in the case of a redundancy or retrenchment exercise, giving an employee sufficient notice is vital to ensuring that they maintain some goodwill towards the company.
  3. Support – if at all possible, helping employees find alternate employment either through informal networks or where possible through outplacement services helps minimise the pain of the transition. Many companies also provide access to coaches to assist employees during their transition and help them get over the immediate shock of the retrenchment to focus on their next opportunity.

Outsiders
Managing the narrative with external stakeholders as well as the perception amongst consumers and competitors is equally important to handling a large retrenchment well.

Competitors will use the period of uncertainty created by the retrenchment to try and poach talent. Given the general uncertainty created within the organisation during a retrenchment exercise, employees are particularly vulnerable to an approach at this time, and it is important to ensure that the employees being retained are reassured during this time.

The image of the organisation amongst customers and the general public is also important to manage during the retrenchment process. For example, it may be better to have one significant round of retrenchments rather than multiple smaller rounds given the potential for bad news to keep circulating in the press.

We have assisted a number of organisations who have planned to downsize by engaging with the employees who are being let go to see if alternative roles can be found for them. Regardless of whether these efforts bear fruit, these initiatives have helped maintain the organisation’s brand and eventually allowed them to continue to attract good talent despite their short term challenges.

If you find yourself facing these challenges, please feel free to reach out and we can discuss how we may be able to help.



This article is written by Nikunj Shah, former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder of Select Global Solutions. 

Select Global Solutions provide Executive Search and Recruitment services to clients across Africa, India and the Middle East. Over the last 10 years we have developed an expertise in multi-cultural recruitment of senior talent across multiple industries. We specialise in sourcing both expatriates and nationals. To find out more about our talent acquisition solutions, get in touch with us at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Related Keyphrases:

effective communication process | external company stakeholders | organisation amongst customers | retrenchment process | talent acquisition solutions | retrenchment exercise | company reputation whilst | perception amongst consumers | large retrenchment | employee sufficient notice | Select Global Solutions | recruitment process | transparent process | external stakeholders | financial compensation

Summer has arrived. Time to wind down, spend time with family and friends, head for the hills, and set the Out of Office message for a couple of weeks as you recharge and refresh, unburdened by the worries of work. Having left your work in your colleagues’ capable hands, you relax, knowing that all will be in order on your return.

Is this truly your reality? Actually, you are probably still connected, checking emails and messages, and generally still engaged with whatever is going on back at work. The concern that the wheels may fall off the bus in your absence, or at the very least a need to know what is happening in the background, mean that you are unable to switch off completely. This inability to let go has many unintended consequences, but are you really indispensable?

Apart from the negative impact on your well-being, which numerous studies have already explored, the inability to let go may also affect organisational performance both in the short and long term. In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader.

In the short term, knowing that you are available at any time, allows your team to avoid taking decisions and abdicate responsibility. By staying in touch, you send a signal that you still wish to be involved, despite not being around. Allowing the team to take ownership of decisions in your absence could have some significant benefits.

Firstly, the team dynamics in your absence could help identify the high potential candidates in your organisation. Which of the team stepped up and took on extra responsibility? How well did they cope without your direction? Who took the time to slack off? After a couple of weeks away, it is often easier to determine how the individuals in the team are all performing.

If problems do arise, these could help identify gaps in your strategy or organisation, which can then be addressed. Some organisations enforce a compulsory two week holiday annually, which allows them to check that their systems are working well and that the organisation is not overly reliant on one individual.

In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader. Career growth demands that there is someone else able to fill your shoes. Building a team that is able to perform without you is a great way to free yourself for bigger challenges.

So, take the plunge and have a break – not only have you earnt it, your team needs it!


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions, an Executive Search and Recruitment Firm providing solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj and the team about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in

Description:

Summer has arrived. Time to wind down, spend time with family and friends, head for the hills, and set the Out of Office message for a couple of weeks as you recharge and refresh, unburdened by the worries of work. Having left your work in your colleagues’ capable hands, you relax, knowing that all will be in order on your return.

Is this truly your reality? Actually, you are probably still connected, checking emails and messages, and generally still engaged with whatever is going on back at work. The concern that the wheels may fall off the bus in your absence, or at the very least a need to know what is happening in the background, mean that you are unable to switch off completely. This inability to let go has many unintended consequences, but are you really indispensable?

Apart from the negative impact on your well-being, which numerous studies have already explored, the inability to let go may also affect organisational performance both in the short and long term. In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader.

In the short term, knowing that you are available at any time, allows your team to avoid taking decisions and abdicate responsibility. By staying in touch, you send a signal that you still wish to be involved, despite not being around. Allowing the team to take ownership of decisions in your absence could have some significant benefits.

Firstly, the team dynamics in your absence could help identify the high potential candidates in your organisation. Which of the team stepped up and took on extra responsibility? How well did they cope without your direction? Who took the time to slack off? After a couple of weeks away, it is often easier to determine how the individuals in the team are all performing.

If problems do arise, these could help identify gaps in your strategy or organisation, which can then be addressed. Some organisations enforce a compulsory two week holiday annually, which allows them to check that their systems are working well and that the organisation is not overly reliant on one individual.

In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader. Career growth demands that there is someone else able to fill your shoes. Building a team that is able to perform without you is a great way to free yourself for bigger challenges.

So, take the plunge and have a break – not only have you earnt it, your team needs it!


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions, an Executive Search and Recruitment Firm providing solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj and the team about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in

Related Keyphrases:

many unintended consequences | compulsory two week holiday | high potential candidates | organisational performance | Select Global Solutions | extra responsibility | growth potential | talent requirements | team dynamics | Datum Recruitment | negative impact | Recruitment Firm | Emerging Markets | Executive Search | numerous studies

In our recent discussions with clients and candidates, an interesting pattern is emerging which may have some very serious consequences for companies' talent acquisition plans and for the careers of senior management.

Following years of robust growth in emerging markets, the war for talent amongst businesses resulted in boom times for employees. Skilled workers were constantly being headhunted as companies tried desperately to maintain their talent pool as they scaled. This led to frequent job changes and rapid increases in remuneration as employees took advantage of the environment. One of the biggest complaints we heard was about the lack of loyalty amongst their workers.
 
As economies have started to recover, companies are once again looking to rebuild their talent pools. However, they are wary of employing individuals who were previously moving from one organisation to another. On the other hand, employees are wary of taking up assignments with organisations that until recently were still reducing headcount. Hence, despite the number of excellent candidates in the market, and a number of very interesting opportunities, many roles are still left unfilled as the mutual risk aversion leads to reluctance from both sides to close the deal.
 
Recently however, companies in emerging markets have been faced with a number of headwinds. Economic growth is falling in a number of countries due to both local and external factors such as elections, fiscal tightening by governments and weak macroeconomic conditions.

Faced with these challenges a number of companies have resorted to downsizing programmes in order to maintain competitiveness. Many employees have found themselves suddenly unemployed. In a few cases, redundancies have taken place in only a few months following the appointment of the employee in the organisation.

These abrupt changes have left many workers scarred and therefore far more risk averse. Those still in employment have also been affected as they hear the news of their friends losing their jobs. There are a number of very highly qualified and talented people who are suddenly looking for work. At the same time, those currently employed are now ultra cautious about making a change. Now workers complain about a lack of loyalty from their employers!

Is your organisation facing a similar situation? What is the solution? Let's have a chat and see if we can help you bridge this gap. 

Description:

In our recent discussions with clients and candidates, an interesting pattern is emerging which may have some very serious consequences for companies' talent acquisition plans and for the careers of senior management.

Following years of robust growth in emerging markets, the war for talent amongst businesses resulted in boom times for employees. Skilled workers were constantly being headhunted as companies tried desperately to maintain their talent pool as they scaled. This led to frequent job changes and rapid increases in remuneration as employees took advantage of the environment. One of the biggest complaints we heard was about the lack of loyalty amongst their workers.
 
As economies have started to recover, companies are once again looking to rebuild their talent pools. However, they are wary of employing individuals who were previously moving from one organisation to another. On the other hand, employees are wary of taking up assignments with organisations that until recently were still reducing headcount. Hence, despite the number of excellent candidates in the market, and a number of very interesting opportunities, many roles are still left unfilled as the mutual risk aversion leads to reluctance from both sides to close the deal.
 
Recently however, companies in emerging markets have been faced with a number of headwinds. Economic growth is falling in a number of countries due to both local and external factors such as elections, fiscal tightening by governments and weak macroeconomic conditions.

Faced with these challenges a number of companies have resorted to downsizing programmes in order to maintain competitiveness. Many employees have found themselves suddenly unemployed. In a few cases, redundancies have taken place in only a few months following the appointment of the employee in the organisation.

These abrupt changes have left many workers scarred and therefore far more risk averse. Those still in employment have also been affected as they hear the news of their friends losing their jobs. There are a number of very highly qualified and talented people who are suddenly looking for work. At the same time, those currently employed are now ultra cautious about making a change. Now workers complain about a lack of loyalty from their employers!

Is your organisation facing a similar situation? What is the solution? Let's have a chat and see if we can help you bridge this gap. 

Related Keyphrases:

talent amongst businesses | talent acquisition plans | frequent job changes | mutual risk aversion | excellent candidates | serious consequences | recent discussions | weak macroeconomic | similar situation | one organisation | loyalty amongst | Many employees | external factors | Economic growth | many workers

As recruiters enter 2019, the challenges in building and sustaining their talent pool continue to grow. All over the world, our clients are advising us of the increased difficulties in recruiting, retaining and engaging with top talent. Here are some of the key challenges they are facing:

Localisation – From the US to Tanzania, governments are making it increasingly difficult to hire expatriate workers. Companies are having to replace experienced workers with locals and competing for a smaller pool of talent. Increasingly companies are looking to increase their graduate hiring in order to start building a talent pool for the future. Attracting and integrating these high flyers into the organisation comes with its own set of challenges though, and this will be a key concern for HR professionals in 2019.

Diversity – companies are increasingly looking to bring in more diversity into their teams and trying to better manage this diversity within the organisation. With evidence showing that greater diversity leads to better organisational performance, companies are trying to attract candidates from more diverse backgrounds in order to encourage greater creativity and improve performance.

Millenials – as a rapidly growing proportion of the workforce, these digital natives are changing the way companies recruit, engage and retain their talent. A generation which is used to instant gratification through social media, has information at their fingertips and has a collectively different world view than baby boomers, needs a different style of management. Companies are having to adapt their entire human resource processes to enable more frequent interaction, improve their image and satisfy the ambitions of this new generation of workers.


Whilst the above challenges are real and significant, by taking a number of sensible actions, companies can positively build the workforce they need to succeed in this environment.

Description:

As recruiters enter 2019, the challenges in building and sustaining their talent pool continue to grow. All over the world, our clients are advising us of the increased difficulties in recruiting, retaining and engaging with top talent. Here are some of the key challenges they are facing:

Localisation – From the US to Tanzania, governments are making it increasingly difficult to hire expatriate workers. Companies are having to replace experienced workers with locals and competing for a smaller pool of talent. Increasingly companies are looking to increase their graduate hiring in order to start building a talent pool for the future. Attracting and integrating these high flyers into the organisation comes with its own set of challenges though, and this will be a key concern for HR professionals in 2019.

Diversity – companies are increasingly looking to bring in more diversity into their teams and trying to better manage this diversity within the organisation. With evidence showing that greater diversity leads to better organisational performance, companies are trying to attract candidates from more diverse backgrounds in order to encourage greater creativity and improve performance.

Millenials – as a rapidly growing proportion of the workforce, these digital natives are changing the way companies recruit, engage and retain their talent. A generation which is used to instant gratification through social media, has information at their fingertips and has a collectively different world view than baby boomers, needs a different style of management. Companies are having to adapt their entire human resource processes to enable more frequent interaction, improve their image and satisfy the ambitions of this new generation of workers.


Whilst the above challenges are real and significant, by taking a number of sensible actions, companies can positively build the workforce they need to succeed in this environment.

Related Keyphrases:

organisational performance | Increasingly companies | hire expatriate workers | increased difficulties | different world view | experienced workers | instant gratification | entire human resource | frequent interaction | diverse backgrounds | attract candidates | talent pool | way companies | key challenges | sensible actions

Work on your handshake: Don't offer up a flimsy or sweaty hand. Instead, when you meet with prospective employers or interviewers, offer a firm handshake, with one or two pumps from the elbow to the hand. It's a good way to illustrate your confidence and start the interview off on the right note.

Get serious: If you take a casual approach to the initial interview with a company, especially with a screening interviewer from the human resources department, you may be sealing your fate. Job seekers should treat every interview as if it's their one and only chance to sell themselves to the recruiter.

Practice makes perfect: Keep the aforementioned cliché in mind if you're offered an interview for a job you may not even want. Go on the interview anyway; you can make contacts for future job opportunities and get valuable interview practice. Who knows? You may even want the job after all.

Be enthusiastic: Bring a positive attitude to your interview. Most interviewers won't bring back someone who has a negative presence or seems like they almost need to be talked into the job. "You're selling yourself and part of you is the positive approach you'll bring to the office every morning," says Alison Richardson, a recruiter for several New York financial firms. "That smile and friendly demeanor go a long way."

Ask questions: When interviewing for a new position, it's essential to have a handful of questions to ask your potential employer. Some questions could include: What do you consider to be the ideal background for the position? What are some of the significant challenges? What's the most important thing I can do to help within the first 90 days of my employment? Do you have any concerns that I need to clear up in order to be the top candidate?

Tell a story: Your interviewer wants to know about your skills and experiences, but he or she also wants to know about you. Don't fire off routine answers to questions. Instead, work your answers into stories or anecdotes about yourself. People remember the people who are interesting. Prove your value by tailoring stories that address the main concern an interviewer may have: What can you do for us?

Show some restraint: During an interview, what you don't say may be as important as what you do say. As a rule, don't talk about money or benefits, especially during the first interview. You should already know if you fit the parameters. Don't badmouth about any of your past employers. Organizations don't hire complainers. Don't mention outside career aspirations or part-time jobs. Employers are looking for people who want to be part of their organization for the next decade and beyond.

Description:

Work on your handshake: Don't offer up a flimsy or sweaty hand. Instead, when you meet with prospective employers or interviewers, offer a firm handshake, with one or two pumps from the elbow to the hand. It's a good way to illustrate your confidence and start the interview off on the right note.

Get serious: If you take a casual approach to the initial interview with a company, especially with a screening interviewer from the human resources department, you may be sealing your fate. Job seekers should treat every interview as if it's their one and only chance to sell themselves to the recruiter.

Practice makes perfect: Keep the aforementioned cliché in mind if you're offered an interview for a job you may not even want. Go on the interview anyway; you can make contacts for future job opportunities and get valuable interview practice. Who knows? You may even want the job after all.

Be enthusiastic: Bring a positive attitude to your interview. Most interviewers won't bring back someone who has a negative presence or seems like they almost need to be talked into the job. "You're selling yourself and part of you is the positive approach you'll bring to the office every morning," says Alison Richardson, a recruiter for several New York financial firms. "That smile and friendly demeanor go a long way."

Ask questions: When interviewing for a new position, it's essential to have a handful of questions to ask your potential employer. Some questions could include: What do you consider to be the ideal background for the position? What are some of the significant challenges? What's the most important thing I can do to help within the first 90 days of my employment? Do you have any concerns that I need to clear up in order to be the top candidate?

Tell a story: Your interviewer wants to know about your skills and experiences, but he or she also wants to know about you. Don't fire off routine answers to questions. Instead, work your answers into stories or anecdotes about yourself. People remember the people who are interesting. Prove your value by tailoring stories that address the main concern an interviewer may have: What can you do for us?

Show some restraint: During an interview, what you don't say may be as important as what you do say. As a rule, don't talk about money or benefits, especially during the first interview. You should already know if you fit the parameters. Don't badmouth about any of your past employers. Organizations don't hire complainers. Don't mention outside career aspirations or part-time jobs. Employers are looking for people who want to be part of their organization for the next decade and beyond.

Related Keyphrases:

valuable interview practice | several New York financial firms | future job opportunities | human resources department | initial interview | first interview | prospective employers | positive approach | career aspirations | positive attitude | potential employer | negative presence | Alison Richardson | hire complainers | important thing

Asian markets are delivering growth three times that of the developed world and that is predicted to continue – and valuations are “reasonable and attractive relative to the rest of the world”.

The key drivers of economic growth in Asia: Increasing consumption driven by rising wealth and consumer spending; A wide range of world-class tech companies; Infrastructure growth driven largely by increasing urbanization; Increasing inter-regional trade, which has benefited from the reduction and removal of tariffs. Asia’s biggest trading partner is now itself. The middle class has grown substantially and is still growing – and this is where the action happens in terms of consumption

The Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) – dominated by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand – which has formed an effective 10-country trade bloc and is now the world’s sixth largest economy with 8 percent of the global population.

Last January, the World Bank released its Global Economic Prospects report indicating that the Philippines is the fastest-growing economy in ASEAN and is expected to sustain its robust economic growth for the next years. It also topped the US News’ list of best countries to invest in the world.

Vietnam has enjoyed strong economic growth. Since 1990, Vietnam’s GDP per capita growth has been among the fastest in the world, averaging 6.4 percent a year in the 2000s. Despite uncertainties in the global environment, Vietnam’s economy remains resilient. It has set its sights on becoming a developed nation by 2020.

Indonesia: The statistic shows the growth in real GDP in Indonesia from between 2012 to 2016, with projections up until 2022. In 2016, Indonesia’s real gross domestic product grew by around 5.02 percent compared to the previous year.



While Singapore and Malaysia are both mature markets which are extremely fast moving and competitive – Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Thailand, are relatively young, emerging markets, where there is great potential for growth. Relative to Singapore and Malaysia, these are large markets which are experiencing high growth with little competition.


Why is South East Asia a great place to work in?

Sitting in a meeting with people from various nationalities really changes your perspective of a business meeting. The dynamics at play working in a cultural melting pot, and the wide range of nationalities we meet on a daily basis really allow you to hone communication, influencing, and negotiation skills. Solving business problems with a plethora of cultures and backgrounds is truly rewarding.

Select Global Solutions is a Global Executive Search firm now expanding its geography to the developing countries of Southeast Asia; where we have closed senior finance, sales, IT and technical roles placing both local and expat talent.

We are currently hiring for executive jobs in across the region. To find out more, email us at info@selectglobal.co.in

Description:

Asian markets are delivering growth three times that of the developed world and that is predicted to continue – and valuations are “reasonable and attractive relative to the rest of the world”.

The key drivers of economic growth in Asia: Increasing consumption driven by rising wealth and consumer spending; A wide range of world-class tech companies; Infrastructure growth driven largely by increasing urbanization; Increasing inter-regional trade, which has benefited from the reduction and removal of tariffs. Asia’s biggest trading partner is now itself. The middle class has grown substantially and is still growing – and this is where the action happens in terms of consumption

The Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) – dominated by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand – which has formed an effective 10-country trade bloc and is now the world’s sixth largest economy with 8 percent of the global population.

Last January, the World Bank released its Global Economic Prospects report indicating that the Philippines is the fastest-growing economy in ASEAN and is expected to sustain its robust economic growth for the next years. It also topped the US News’ list of best countries to invest in the world.

Vietnam has enjoyed strong economic growth. Since 1990, Vietnam’s GDP per capita growth has been among the fastest in the world, averaging 6.4 percent a year in the 2000s. Despite uncertainties in the global environment, Vietnam’s economy remains resilient. It has set its sights on becoming a developed nation by 2020.

Indonesia: The statistic shows the growth in real GDP in Indonesia from between 2012 to 2016, with projections up until 2022. In 2016, Indonesia’s real gross domestic product grew by around 5.02 percent compared to the previous year.



While Singapore and Malaysia are both mature markets which are extremely fast moving and competitive – Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Thailand, are relatively young, emerging markets, where there is great potential for growth. Relative to Singapore and Malaysia, these are large markets which are experiencing high growth with little competition.


Why is South East Asia a great place to work in?

Sitting in a meeting with people from various nationalities really changes your perspective of a business meeting. The dynamics at play working in a cultural melting pot, and the wide range of nationalities we meet on a daily basis really allow you to hone communication, influencing, and negotiation skills. Solving business problems with a plethora of cultures and backgrounds is truly rewarding.

Select Global Solutions is a Global Executive Search firm now expanding its geography to the developing countries of Southeast Asia; where we have closed senior finance, sales, IT and technical roles placing both local and expat talent.

We are currently hiring for executive jobs in across the region. To find out more, email us at info@selectglobal.co.in

Related Keyphrases:

Global Economic Prospects report | s real gross domestic product | robust economic growth | strong economic growth | Global Executive Search firm | Infrastructure growth | South East Asian Nations | growth three times | Increasing consumption | various nationalities | capita growth | attractive relative | global environment | high growth | Global Solutions

To say that gender pay gap is universal is hardly an exaggeration with figures dangerously favouring males in nearly all industries and roles. 

Gender continues to be a significant parameter in determining salaries in India, as men earned a median gross hourly salary of Rs 345.8, whereas women earned Rs 259.8, a survey has showed.


Median Hourly Wage by Age & Gender

Based on the data for the eight sectors covered by this report, the overall gender pay gap in India amounts to 25% in 2016. The largest gender pay gap in 2016 was found in the Transport, logistics, and communication (42.4%). The lowest was recorded in the Education and research, where women earned 3.4% more than men.


Sectorial overview

Information and Communication Technology Services

• The average gender pay gap of 38.2% is one of the widest observed in this report. Women earn Rs142.5 less per hour than men.

Financial Services, Banking and Insurance

• The gender pay gap in the financial services, banking and insurance sector amounts to 21.5%.  On average, men earn an hourly median wage of Rs346.4 and women Rs272.

Education and Research

• In the education and research sector, the gender pays gap amounts to 14.7% on average. The gender pay gap increased again from 19.2% and 13.1% in 2014 and 2015, respectively, to -3.4% in 2016

Healthcare, Caring services, and Social Work

• On average, a 22.6% gender gap exists in the healthcare, caring services, and social work sector. Male employees earned Rs242.4, female employees Rs187.6 per hour.

Construction and Technical Consultancy

•. On an average, men earned Rs52.2 more than women in this sector. Thus, there is a gender pay gap of 18.1%.

Legal and Market Consultancy and Business Activities

• On average, the gender pay gap in the legal and market consultancy and business activities sector is 27.5% (Rs73.9) per hour. Women earn Rs195.0, men Rs268.9.

Transport, Logistics and Communications

• Professionals in the transport, logistics and communications sector earn similar wages on average. Women remain underpaid by 5.2%.

Why Gender Pay gap exists? 

Some reasons behind this gap could be “preference for male employees over female employees, preference for the promotion of male employees to supervisory positions (the glass ceiling), career breaks of women due to parenthood duties, and other socio-cultural factors.

There is a dire need for tangible initiatives to bridge this pay gap by removing structural impediments to women's growth providing access to skills training, jobs and decision-making.

Shattering the glass ceiling

Several women hold key leadership positions, earning enviable salaries in jobs in India in various industry sectors, taking up new challenges, and empowering their teams to come up with the best possible solutions. With thousands of people reporting to them, these women are a force to reckon with in the business.

Why hire women?

Women are unique in many ways as they come with stronger social values, ethos, diversity, resilience, and the determination to not settle for anything but the best. They bring a unique perspective and approach to any challenge. The skills and expertise of women is essential to India’s economic recovery and growth. Optimising women's productivity, creativity and energy is a win-win game for enterprises, workers, governments and societies.

Description:

To say that gender pay gap is universal is hardly an exaggeration with figures dangerously favouring males in nearly all industries and roles. 

Gender continues to be a significant parameter in determining salaries in India, as men earned a median gross hourly salary of Rs 345.8, whereas women earned Rs 259.8, a survey has showed.


Median Hourly Wage by Age & Gender

Based on the data for the eight sectors covered by this report, the overall gender pay gap in India amounts to 25% in 2016. The largest gender pay gap in 2016 was found in the Transport, logistics, and communication (42.4%). The lowest was recorded in the Education and research, where women earned 3.4% more than men.


Sectorial overview

Information and Communication Technology Services

• The average gender pay gap of 38.2% is one of the widest observed in this report. Women earn Rs142.5 less per hour than men.

Financial Services, Banking and Insurance

• The gender pay gap in the financial services, banking and insurance sector amounts to 21.5%.  On average, men earn an hourly median wage of Rs346.4 and women Rs272.

Education and Research

• In the education and research sector, the gender pays gap amounts to 14.7% on average. The gender pay gap increased again from 19.2% and 13.1% in 2014 and 2015, respectively, to -3.4% in 2016

Healthcare, Caring services, and Social Work

• On average, a 22.6% gender gap exists in the healthcare, caring services, and social work sector. Male employees earned Rs242.4, female employees Rs187.6 per hour.

Construction and Technical Consultancy

•. On an average, men earned Rs52.2 more than women in this sector. Thus, there is a gender pay gap of 18.1%.

Legal and Market Consultancy and Business Activities

• On average, the gender pay gap in the legal and market consultancy and business activities sector is 27.5% (Rs73.9) per hour. Women earn Rs195.0, men Rs268.9.

Transport, Logistics and Communications

• Professionals in the transport, logistics and communications sector earn similar wages on average. Women remain underpaid by 5.2%.

Why Gender Pay gap exists? 

Some reasons behind this gap could be “preference for male employees over female employees, preference for the promotion of male employees to supervisory positions (the glass ceiling), career breaks of women due to parenthood duties, and other socio-cultural factors.

There is a dire need for tangible initiatives to bridge this pay gap by removing structural impediments to women's growth providing access to skills training, jobs and decision-making.

Shattering the glass ceiling

Several women hold key leadership positions, earning enviable salaries in jobs in India in various industry sectors, taking up new challenges, and empowering their teams to come up with the best possible solutions. With thousands of people reporting to them, these women are a force to reckon with in the business.

Why hire women?

Women are unique in many ways as they come with stronger social values, ethos, diversity, resilience, and the determination to not settle for anything but the best. They bring a unique perspective and approach to any challenge. The skills and expertise of women is essential to India’s economic recovery and growth. Optimising women's productivity, creativity and energy is a win-win game for enterprises, workers, governments and societies.

Related Keyphrases:

average gender pay gap | overall gender pay gap | business activities sector | gender gap | insurance sector amounts | Optimising women | communications sector | various industry sectors | key leadership positions | Communication Technology | Women remain underpaid | social work sector | whereas women | gap amounts

(Mumbai Mirror)

While most candidates prepare for an interview based on the questions they would be asked, they overlook the important fact that you have the opportunity to interview the prospective employer as well.Being prepared with your questions reinforces your suitability as a candidate and gives you an invaluable opportunity to find out more about your role and the company you're applying to Quizzing the interviewer changes his or her perception of you and provides you the opportunity to discover whether your goals and the company's goals are aligned.

So here are some questions for a candidate to ask an interviewer:

  1. How would the position I'm applying for evolve?
  2. This will help you to understand whether there's opportunity to progress. Did the previous employee move on, due to the role being a dead end or used it as a stepping stone to advance his/her career?
  3. Can you share what my day-to-day responsibilities will entail?
  4. This will give you a handle on your role and its expectations on a daily basis.
  5. How could I exceed your expectations in my role in the first three months?
  6. This is a good question to gauge what the employer defines as 'high' performance. Very often a mismatch happens when both are looking at different goalposts.
  7. What challenges could I face in the first three months?
  8. An important question to prepare you for whatever comes your way. To be in readiness and take it head on and work through it. If the interviewer says that there aren't any, it's your cue to do some due diligence.
  9. What qualities are the most important for doing well and advancing here?
  10. This will help you in understanding how you fit and what is needed to climb the ladder of success here.
  11. Will I have an opportunity to meet those who would be part of team during the interview process?
  12. Another reason to display your enthusiasm for the job as well as for you to assess the people you will be working with and whether they are the right team.
  13. Where do you see the company in three years and how would the person in this role contribute to this vision?
  14. This demonstrates your interest in being successful in the organisation and gauge whether it aligns with your own roadmap of success.
  15. In what way is performance measured and reviewed?
  16. This communicates the evaluation process, the results that are expected and the metrics used to measure your growth in the organisation.
  17. What do you enjoy most about working here?
  18. Work forms a huge part of your life, and you may want to be sure you'll be working with people that actually love and enjoy what they do. Be aware of the words and body language used during this response. It'll give you clues.
  19. Is there anything that concerns you about my background being fit for this role?
  20. A pointed question can help you in receiving immediate feedback on any specific expectations.
  21. Is there anything we haven't covered that you think is important to know about working here?
  22. This leaves room for any question you may have forgotten or are not aware of.
  23. When can I expect to hear from you and what are the next steps?
  24. The wait after an interview is in most cases filled with anxiety. This provides clarity and sets your mind at ease.
  25. A close is important in a sale. Interviews are all about the interviewing manager and the candidate selling to each other. How you close an interview just like a sale has relevance. Interviewing the interviewer provides you the opportunity to stand out from the crowd and helps you to make sure the job is right for you.
  26. The advice for potential job seekers is to let go of the fear of getting grilled in an interview and go confidently as a strong candidate with invaluable strengths.


Description:

(Mumbai Mirror)

While most candidates prepare for an interview based on the questions they would be asked, they overlook the important fact that you have the opportunity to interview the prospective employer as well.Being prepared with your questions reinforces your suitability as a candidate and gives you an invaluable opportunity to find out more about your role and the company you're applying to Quizzing the interviewer changes his or her perception of you and provides you the opportunity to discover whether your goals and the company's goals are aligned.

So here are some questions for a candidate to ask an interviewer:

  1. How would the position I'm applying for evolve?
  2. This will help you to understand whether there's opportunity to progress. Did the previous employee move on, due to the role being a dead end or used it as a stepping stone to advance his/her career?
  3. Can you share what my day-to-day responsibilities will entail?
  4. This will give you a handle on your role and its expectations on a daily basis.
  5. How could I exceed your expectations in my role in the first three months?
  6. This is a good question to gauge what the employer defines as 'high' performance. Very often a mismatch happens when both are looking at different goalposts.
  7. What challenges could I face in the first three months?
  8. An important question to prepare you for whatever comes your way. To be in readiness and take it head on and work through it. If the interviewer says that there aren't any, it's your cue to do some due diligence.
  9. What qualities are the most important for doing well and advancing here?
  10. This will help you in understanding how you fit and what is needed to climb the ladder of success here.
  11. Will I have an opportunity to meet those who would be part of team during the interview process?
  12. Another reason to display your enthusiasm for the job as well as for you to assess the people you will be working with and whether they are the right team.
  13. Where do you see the company in three years and how would the person in this role contribute to this vision?
  14. This demonstrates your interest in being successful in the organisation and gauge whether it aligns with your own roadmap of success.
  15. In what way is performance measured and reviewed?
  16. This communicates the evaluation process, the results that are expected and the metrics used to measure your growth in the organisation.
  17. What do you enjoy most about working here?
  18. Work forms a huge part of your life, and you may want to be sure you'll be working with people that actually love and enjoy what they do. Be aware of the words and body language used during this response. It'll give you clues.
  19. Is there anything that concerns you about my background being fit for this role?
  20. A pointed question can help you in receiving immediate feedback on any specific expectations.
  21. Is there anything we haven't covered that you think is important to know about working here?
  22. This leaves room for any question you may have forgotten or are not aware of.
  23. When can I expect to hear from you and what are the next steps?
  24. The wait after an interview is in most cases filled with anxiety. This provides clarity and sets your mind at ease.
  25. A close is important in a sale. Interviews are all about the interviewing manager and the candidate selling to each other. How you close an interview just like a sale has relevance. Interviewing the interviewer provides you the opportunity to stand out from the crowd and helps you to make sure the job is right for you.
  26. The advice for potential job seekers is to let go of the fear of getting grilled in an interview and go confidently as a strong candidate with invaluable strengths.


Related Keyphrases:

invaluable opportunity | important question | interview process | potential job seekers | questions reinforces | previous employee move | interviewer changes | first three months | prospective employer | role contribute | interviewing manager | important fact | candidates prepare | immediate feedback | candidate selling

(Mumbai Mirror)

While most candidates prepare for an interview based on the questions they would be asked, they overlook the important fact that you have the opportunity to interview the prospective employer as well.

Being prepared with your questions reinforces your suitability as a candidate and gives you an invaluable opportunity to find out more about your role and the company you're applying to Quizzing the interviewer changes his or her perception of you and provides you the opportunity to discover whether your goals and the company's goals are aligned.

So here are some questions for a candidate to ask an interviewer:

  1. How would the position I'm applying for evolve?
  2. This will help you to understand whether there's opportunity to progress. Did the previous employee move on, due to the role being a dead end or used it as a stepping stone to advance his/her career?
  3. Can you share what my day-to-day responsibilities will entail?
  4. This will give you a handle on your role and its expectations on a daily basis.
  5. How could I exceed your expectations in my role in the first three months?
  6. This is a good question to gauge what the employer defines as 'high' performance. Very often a mismatch happens when both are looking at different goalposts.
  7. What challenges could I face in the first three months?
  8. An important question to prepare you for whatever comes your way. To be in readiness and take it head on and work through it. If the interviewer says that there aren't any, it's your cue to do some due diligence.
  9. What qualities are the most important for doing well and advancing here?
  10. This will help you in understanding how you fit and what is needed to climb the ladder of success here.
  11. Will I have an opportunity to meet those who would be part of team during the interview process?
  12. Another reason to display your enthusiasm for the job as well as for you to assess the people you will be working with and whether they are the right team.
  13. Where do you see the company in three years and how would the person in this role contribute to this vision?
  14. This demonstrates your interest in being successful in the organisation and gauge whether it aligns with your own roadmap of success.
  15. In what way is performance measured and reviewed?
  16. This communicates the evaluation process, the results that are expected and the metrics used to measure your growth in the organisation.
  17. What do you enjoy most about working here?
  18. Work forms a huge part of your life, and you may want to be sure you'll be working with people that actually love and enjoy what they do. Be aware of the words and body language used during this response. It'll give you clues.
  19. Is there anything that concerns you about my background being fit for this role?
  20. A pointed question can help you in receiving immediate feedback on any specific expectations.
  21. Is there anything we haven't covered that you think is important to know about working here?
  22. This leaves room for any question you may have forgotten or are not aware of.
  23. When can I expect to hear from you and what are the next steps?
  24. The wait after an interview is in most cases filled with anxiety. This provides clarity and sets your mind at ease.
  25. A close is important in a sale. Interviews are all about the interviewing manager and the candidate selling to each other. How you close an interview just like a sale has relevance. Interviewing the interviewer provides you the opportunity to stand out from the crowd and helps you to make sure the job is right for you.
  26. The advice for potential job seekers is to let go of the fear of getting grilled in an interview and go confidently as a strong candidate with invaluable strengths.

Description:

(Mumbai Mirror)

While most candidates prepare for an interview based on the questions they would be asked, they overlook the important fact that you have the opportunity to interview the prospective employer as well.

Being prepared with your questions reinforces your suitability as a candidate and gives you an invaluable opportunity to find out more about your role and the company you're applying to Quizzing the interviewer changes his or her perception of you and provides you the opportunity to discover whether your goals and the company's goals are aligned.

So here are some questions for a candidate to ask an interviewer:

  1. How would the position I'm applying for evolve?
  2. This will help you to understand whether there's opportunity to progress. Did the previous employee move on, due to the role being a dead end or used it as a stepping stone to advance his/her career?
  3. Can you share what my day-to-day responsibilities will entail?
  4. This will give you a handle on your role and its expectations on a daily basis.
  5. How could I exceed your expectations in my role in the first three months?
  6. This is a good question to gauge what the employer defines as 'high' performance. Very often a mismatch happens when both are looking at different goalposts.
  7. What challenges could I face in the first three months?
  8. An important question to prepare you for whatever comes your way. To be in readiness and take it head on and work through it. If the interviewer says that there aren't any, it's your cue to do some due diligence.
  9. What qualities are the most important for doing well and advancing here?
  10. This will help you in understanding how you fit and what is needed to climb the ladder of success here.
  11. Will I have an opportunity to meet those who would be part of team during the interview process?
  12. Another reason to display your enthusiasm for the job as well as for you to assess the people you will be working with and whether they are the right team.
  13. Where do you see the company in three years and how would the person in this role contribute to this vision?
  14. This demonstrates your interest in being successful in the organisation and gauge whether it aligns with your own roadmap of success.
  15. In what way is performance measured and reviewed?
  16. This communicates the evaluation process, the results that are expected and the metrics used to measure your growth in the organisation.
  17. What do you enjoy most about working here?
  18. Work forms a huge part of your life, and you may want to be sure you'll be working with people that actually love and enjoy what they do. Be aware of the words and body language used during this response. It'll give you clues.
  19. Is there anything that concerns you about my background being fit for this role?
  20. A pointed question can help you in receiving immediate feedback on any specific expectations.
  21. Is there anything we haven't covered that you think is important to know about working here?
  22. This leaves room for any question you may have forgotten or are not aware of.
  23. When can I expect to hear from you and what are the next steps?
  24. The wait after an interview is in most cases filled with anxiety. This provides clarity and sets your mind at ease.
  25. A close is important in a sale. Interviews are all about the interviewing manager and the candidate selling to each other. How you close an interview just like a sale has relevance. Interviewing the interviewer provides you the opportunity to stand out from the crowd and helps you to make sure the job is right for you.
  26. The advice for potential job seekers is to let go of the fear of getting grilled in an interview and go confidently as a strong candidate with invaluable strengths.

Related Keyphrases:

invaluable opportunity | important question | interview process | potential job seekers | questions reinforces | previous employee move | invaluable strengths | first three months | prospective employer | interviewer changes | role contribute | interviewing manager | important fact | candidates prepare | immediate feedback

Across the world, men tend to get paid more than women for the same work. Estimates vary, but some studies have found that the gender pay gap is quite significant in many industries. For India, job search platform Monster has estimated that women are strongly underpaid with the overall gender pay gap at 25% in 2016.

In India, the gender pay gap story holds true. However, the reasons for this gap could reveal a very different story. The gender pay gap is primarily a manifestation of the underlying diversity challenges that organisations currently face.

On a positive note some companies are taking steps to resolve this. Adobe Systems announced a pay parity policy to close the gender wage gap across its India and global operations; in a move to fully eliminate the gender wage gap by early next year.

Employees in Adobe???s Indian offices compromise over a quarter of the organisation???s global strength. This move is aimed at abolishing the gender pay disparity in the technology industry, and is in line with the company's commitment towards building Adobe India as a diverse and inclusive workplace for all.

Adobe is moving away from the practice of looking at historic compensation. Other leading companies also acknowledged the problem and expressed that more initiatives were required to bring gender parity in companies and focus on the issue. In IT companies in India, there is no disparity at the entry level, but disparities begin at later stages of the career. Many experts point out that the situation is better in the IT industry compared to other industries.

Description:

Across the world, men tend to get paid more than women for the same work. Estimates vary, but some studies have found that the gender pay gap is quite significant in many industries. For India, job search platform Monster has estimated that women are strongly underpaid with the overall gender pay gap at 25% in 2016.

In India, the gender pay gap story holds true. However, the reasons for this gap could reveal a very different story. The gender pay gap is primarily a manifestation of the underlying diversity challenges that organisations currently face.

On a positive note some companies are taking steps to resolve this. Adobe Systems announced a pay parity policy to close the gender wage gap across its India and global operations; in a move to fully eliminate the gender wage gap by early next year.

Employees in Adobe???s Indian offices compromise over a quarter of the organisation???s global strength. This move is aimed at abolishing the gender pay disparity in the technology industry, and is in line with the company's commitment towards building Adobe India as a diverse and inclusive workplace for all.

Adobe is moving away from the practice of looking at historic compensation. Other leading companies also acknowledged the problem and expressed that more initiatives were required to bring gender parity in companies and focus on the issue. In IT companies in India, there is no disparity at the entry level, but disparities begin at later stages of the career. Many experts point out that the situation is better in the IT industry compared to other industries.

Related Keyphrases:

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Across the world, men tend to get paid more than women for the same work. Estimates vary, but some studies have found that the gender pay gap is quite significant in many industries. For India, job search platform Monster has estimated that women are strongly underpaid with the overall gender pay gap at 25% in 2016.

In India, the gender pay gap story holds true. However, the reasons for this gap could reveal a very different story. The gender pay gap is primarily a manifestation of the underlying diversity challenges that organisations currently face.

On a positive note some companies are taking steps to resolve this. Adobe Systems announced a pay parity policy to close the gender wage gap across its India and global operations; in a move to fully eliminate the gender wage gap by early next year.

Employees in Adobe’s Indian offices compromise over a quarter of the organisation’s global strength. This move is aimed at abolishing the gender pay disparity in the technology industry, and is in line with the company's commitment towards building Adobe India as a diverse and inclusive workplace for all.

Adobe is moving away from the practice of looking at historic compensation. Other leading companies also acknowledged the problem and expressed that more initiatives were required to bring gender parity in companies and focus on the issue. In IT companies in India, there is no disparity at the entry level, but disparities begin at later stages of the career. Many experts point out that the situation is better in the IT industry compared to other industries.

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Across the world, men tend to get paid more than women for the same work. Estimates vary, but some studies have found that the gender pay gap is quite significant in many industries. For India, job search platform Monster has estimated that women are strongly underpaid with the overall gender pay gap at 25% in 2016.

In India, the gender pay gap story holds true. However, the reasons for this gap could reveal a very different story. The gender pay gap is primarily a manifestation of the underlying diversity challenges that organisations currently face.

On a positive note some companies are taking steps to resolve this. Adobe Systems announced a pay parity policy to close the gender wage gap across its India and global operations; in a move to fully eliminate the gender wage gap by early next year.

Employees in Adobe’s Indian offices compromise over a quarter of the organisation’s global strength. This move is aimed at abolishing the gender pay disparity in the technology industry, and is in line with the company's commitment towards building Adobe India as a diverse and inclusive workplace for all.

Adobe is moving away from the practice of looking at historic compensation. Other leading companies also acknowledged the problem and expressed that more initiatives were required to bring gender parity in companies and focus on the issue. In IT companies in India, there is no disparity at the entry level, but disparities begin at later stages of the career. Many experts point out that the situation is better in the IT industry compared to other industries.

Related Keyphrases:

overall gender pay gap | gender pay gap story | gender pay disparity | job search platform Monster | gender wage gap | bring gender parity | pay parity policy | historic compensation | diversity challenges | technology industry | s global strength | inclusive workplace | global operations | commitment towards | Adobe India