Related to "talent acquisition"

Firstly, please allow us to wish you a very Happy and Healthy New Year and one which is hopefully substantially better than 2020 for most of us.

Since March last year, the world has been struggling to adjust to the new normal created by the pandemic and had to quickly adjust to a fluid and highly volatile environment. Managing talent during this time has probably been one of the key challenges faced by organisations. Having spoken to and working with clients across the world, we thought it might be interesting to share some of our learnings from these experiences.

Seeking opportunities in adversity
Like many organisations, in March 2020 we had to quickly get our team ready to Work from Home in case India went into lockdown. What was initially a temporary measure, now looks to be permanent, and we are now operating as if this new way of working will be our new normal.

Whilst this has created challenges, it has also opened up new opportunities (in our case, we can now look for talent far and wide, instead of being restricted to where our office was). Many of our clients have also taken this opportunity to cast their nets wider when looking for talent.

Be flexible and nimble
Despite the various lockdowns all over the world, we were fortunate enough to avoid most of the restrictions by travelling to and working from locations where lockdowns were lighter or had been removed. However, at times we risked getting stuck due to rapid changes in travel restrictions. This was a problem for many clients and candidates, especially when taking overseas placements.

It is therefore important to be able to find innovative ways to get around or past some of these hurdles – clients that were able to do this managed to get their resources where they needed them and thrive despite a terrible economic environment.

Discipline
Throughout this period, we maintained a regular work schedule, regardless of where we were working from. Team calls were held daily and timings adjusted to suit our location. Clients were responded to in a timely fashion. Candidates were spoken to at times convenient to them.

By insisting that our standards did not drop, we were able to ensure that the team remained engaged and continued to perform despite the challenges of working remotely. However, perhaps more importantly, we were also disciplined in taking a break. Realising that this was a marathon and not a sprint meant that we made a conscious effort to switch off regularly and avoid working nonstop.

The past year has provided us with many challenges and opportunities and we have tried to address these in the best possible way. No doubt, we have made some mistakes and probably could have done things better!

It would be great to hear about your experiences and learnings, especially when it comes to talent acquisition and management so please feel free to reach out to us with your comments or queries.

Description:

Firstly, please allow us to wish you a very Happy and Healthy New Year and one which is hopefully substantially better than 2020 for most of us.

Since March last year, the world has been struggling to adjust to the new normal created by the pandemic and had to quickly adjust to a fluid and highly volatile environment. Managing talent during this time has probably been one of the key challenges faced by organisations. Having spoken to and working with clients across the world, we thought it might be interesting to share some of our learnings from these experiences.

Seeking opportunities in adversity
Like many organisations, in March 2020 we had to quickly get our team ready to Work from Home in case India went into lockdown. What was initially a temporary measure, now looks to be permanent, and we are now operating as if this new way of working will be our new normal.

Whilst this has created challenges, it has also opened up new opportunities (in our case, we can now look for talent far and wide, instead of being restricted to where our office was). Many of our clients have also taken this opportunity to cast their nets wider when looking for talent.

Be flexible and nimble
Despite the various lockdowns all over the world, we were fortunate enough to avoid most of the restrictions by travelling to and working from locations where lockdowns were lighter or had been removed. However, at times we risked getting stuck due to rapid changes in travel restrictions. This was a problem for many clients and candidates, especially when taking overseas placements.

It is therefore important to be able to find innovative ways to get around or past some of these hurdles – clients that were able to do this managed to get their resources where they needed them and thrive despite a terrible economic environment.

Discipline
Throughout this period, we maintained a regular work schedule, regardless of where we were working from. Team calls were held daily and timings adjusted to suit our location. Clients were responded to in a timely fashion. Candidates were spoken to at times convenient to them.

By insisting that our standards did not drop, we were able to ensure that the team remained engaged and continued to perform despite the challenges of working remotely. However, perhaps more importantly, we were also disciplined in taking a break. Realising that this was a marathon and not a sprint meant that we made a conscious effort to switch off regularly and avoid working nonstop.

The past year has provided us with many challenges and opportunities and we have tried to address these in the best possible way. No doubt, we have made some mistakes and probably could have done things better!

It would be great to hear about your experiences and learnings, especially when it comes to talent acquisition and management so please feel free to reach out to us with your comments or queries.

Related Keyphrases:

new opportunities | volatile environment | talent acquisition | many organisations | regular work schedule | many challenges | terrible economic | times convenient | key challenges | various lockdowns | temporary measure | many clients | March last year | conscious effort | Healthy New Year

Description:

As a recruiter with 8+ years of experience I have built my expertise in recruitment for the African continent, and India. During my last 8 years, I have handled end to end recruitment for mid to senior levels across verticals and domains.  With hands-on experience in headhunting, talent search, client management and database search, and referencing, which plays a major role to attract the right profile. 

Out of my tenure, I have been working with Nikunj Shah (first at Datum Recruitment Services and now at Select Global Solutions) for 5 years. He has given me a dynamic, creative, and challenging environment where I am not only working but enjoying both the work and growth of my role, which has helped get the best out of me.

I believe recruitment is a very holistic profession, where I can connect with people’s minds, hearts, and sometimes with family. I am happy to help people get their dream jobs across the world.

Learning is a continuous process of an individual’s life and It has helped me learn negotiation, counselling, building relations, a thorough understanding of various industries as well as profiles.

Related Keyphrases:

Select Global Solutions | challenging environment | holistic profession | various industries | continuous process | building relations | end recruitment | client management | Datum Recruitment | African continent | database search | last 8 years | talent search | senior levels | help people

Description:

After I completed my MBA from Australia and moved back to India, I started my career as a recruitment consultant for Datum Recruitment Services, led by Nikunj Shah, who now leads us at Select Global Solutions. Many (like me) say they 'fell into recruitment'. Although that may be how some of us began our recruitment careers, for me it is the varied nature of the work and rewarding benefits that made me realise recruitment was the right career choice.

Being in recruitment you are responsible for helping people find the right job, which could actually be a life-changing opportunity for them. So functionally and emotionally, it is very satisfying when you get it right, not only for you but for the person that you placed and the team you just strengthened with new talent.

Everyday is a different day simply because you're dealing with people, by their very nature, are quite unpredictable and most of what everyone does is driven by their emotions. Therefore, there are a lot of moving parts in recruitment and things can, and will, go wrong which are beyond our control.

Luckily, I have the full support from the whole team towards sucess. Indeed It is a demanding career but, without a doubt, a rewarding one.

Related Keyphrases:

recruitment consultant | recruitment careers | Select Global Solutions | whole team towards | Datum Recruitment | right career | different day | unpredictable | full support | responsible | opportunity | Nikunj Shah | right job | Therefore | Australia

The world is slowly coming out of the pandemic induced coma and economies around the world are starting to rebuild. During this time of uncertainty, there has been a tremendous amount of turbulence in the job market. Some companies have had to retrench or cut salaries or both, and other companies have been scaling up as they benefit from the move online by consumers.

Many companies have witnessed a substantial amount of churn in their workforce as employees have chosen to move closer to their families, or to perceived safe havens.

Companies have been forced to suddenly try and recruit remotely and accelerate their hiring as they grapple with unexpected departures or sudden growth in their business. The combination of trying to recruit rapidly and remotely has created numerous challenges for recruiters and many employers are struggling to effectively hire suitable candidates as a result.

Quick hiring
The first challenge is to find suitable candidates who are able to join the organisation quickly. Whilst there are currently many candidates looking for new roles, the best candidates have been retained by their organisations and are reluctant to move during these unpredictable times. Even when these candidates are open to a move, their notice periods and the current travel restrictions result in very long delays before they can join a new organisation.

Rigorous screening
The next challenge is how to effectively screen candidates when physical interviews are not possible. Whilst for junior roles it may be possible to get away with telephonic or VC interviews, it becomes much harder to screen candidates at managerial level, when personality, attitude and culture start becoming more important.

Testing and technology
Companies have tried to use various competency and psychometric tests and new technology such as Artificial Intelligence to try and improve their assessment of candidates. Whilst these can give helpful clues and support an interviewers assessment, they often lead to either inconclusive or negative assessments and can disqualify candidates that would otherwise have been a good fit for the role.

Process, process, process
In our experience, we have found that the best way to try and overcome these challenges is to put in place a robust process for both sourcing and screening of candidates, and utilise multiple tools to try and build a holistic view of candidates;

  1. Utilise Technical Assessments where applicable to initially screen candidates – depending on the seniority of the role, these can often help shortlist relevant candidates up front.
  2. Invest time in engaging with candidates, ideally with multiple interviewers to try and reduce any bias and also get a better understanding of each candidate.
  3. Use psychometric tests wherever possible to support the assessments during interview.
  4. Perform very thorough reference checks on the candidates. Use a combination of both direct and indirect references, combined with the interviews and other assessment tools.

The downside of this approach is that it can often be time consuming. Unfortunately, in trying to recruit good talent, there are no short cuts!

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.  We have been able to help a number of our clients fill critical positions quickly over the past few months.

Description:

The world is slowly coming out of the pandemic induced coma and economies around the world are starting to rebuild. During this time of uncertainty, there has been a tremendous amount of turbulence in the job market. Some companies have had to retrench or cut salaries or both, and other companies have been scaling up as they benefit from the move online by consumers.

Many companies have witnessed a substantial amount of churn in their workforce as employees have chosen to move closer to their families, or to perceived safe havens.

Companies have been forced to suddenly try and recruit remotely and accelerate their hiring as they grapple with unexpected departures or sudden growth in their business. The combination of trying to recruit rapidly and remotely has created numerous challenges for recruiters and many employers are struggling to effectively hire suitable candidates as a result.

Quick hiring
The first challenge is to find suitable candidates who are able to join the organisation quickly. Whilst there are currently many candidates looking for new roles, the best candidates have been retained by their organisations and are reluctant to move during these unpredictable times. Even when these candidates are open to a move, their notice periods and the current travel restrictions result in very long delays before they can join a new organisation.

Rigorous screening
The next challenge is how to effectively screen candidates when physical interviews are not possible. Whilst for junior roles it may be possible to get away with telephonic or VC interviews, it becomes much harder to screen candidates at managerial level, when personality, attitude and culture start becoming more important.

Testing and technology
Companies have tried to use various competency and psychometric tests and new technology such as Artificial Intelligence to try and improve their assessment of candidates. Whilst these can give helpful clues and support an interviewers assessment, they often lead to either inconclusive or negative assessments and can disqualify candidates that would otherwise have been a good fit for the role.

Process, process, process
In our experience, we have found that the best way to try and overcome these challenges is to put in place a robust process for both sourcing and screening of candidates, and utilise multiple tools to try and build a holistic view of candidates;

  1. Utilise Technical Assessments where applicable to initially screen candidates – depending on the seniority of the role, these can often help shortlist relevant candidates up front.
  2. Invest time in engaging with candidates, ideally with multiple interviewers to try and reduce any bias and also get a better understanding of each candidate.
  3. Use psychometric tests wherever possible to support the assessments during interview.
  4. Perform very thorough reference checks on the candidates. Use a combination of both direct and indirect references, combined with the interviews and other assessment tools.

The downside of this approach is that it can often be time consuming. Unfortunately, in trying to recruit good talent, there are no short cuts!

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.  We have been able to help a number of our clients fill critical positions quickly over the past few months.

Related Keyphrases:

suitable candidates | relevant candidates | screen candidates | many candidates | Utilise Technical Assessments | talent management solutions | current travel restrictions | interviewers assessment | recruit good talent | utilise multiple tools | multiple interviewers | Artificial Intelligence | possible solutions | negative assessments | unexpected departures

Following the turmoil this year, we have been speaking to our clients and candidates across the world to try and make sense of what is happening and what may come next for hiring and managing talent.

Some common themes that have already been reported:

  1. Work From Home (WFH) is here to stay, though perhaps not at 100%
  2. Most companies have imposed hiring freezes and/or are going through painful downsizing or paycuts
  3. There are multiple applicants for most jobs and many of the candidates are vastly overqualified for these roles
  4. Graduates are in a really tough bind at the moment

And so on….

We also found some other trends that are less obvious and sometimes counterintuitive. Here we share some of the more surprising trends that we have been encountering;

Talent - It is getting harder to hire (yes, really!)
Given the earlier comments about multiple applicants for any job being posted, this statement seems a little daft. In reality, what we saw is that many good candidates are not willing to switch jobs at this time. Even those who had been forced to take a pay cut, were willing to stick it out with their current organisation.

Very few employees working with larger organisations and respected brands were willing to consider a change, despite being offered higher salaries. Those who had recently been let go were still wary of taking on a job with lesser known companies and preferred organisations perceived to be more stable.

Trepidation - Employees are worried about WFH
Many articles have predicted how organisations will be forced to allow employees much greater flexibility and freedom in working from home. In reality, many employees want to get back to the office. Apart from the obvious reasons (children, internet, air-conditioning, social interaction etc.) they are also concerned about the impact of WFH on their career prospects. Recent graduates worry about the lack of mentoring and visibility, more senior employees worry about how the next promotion will come through. Worries about job security and lack of contact with superiors were fuelling their desire to get back to the office.

Technology - Driving a new wave of hiring and firing
Despite the headlines around job losses across sectors and organisations, there is an increase in opportunities for positions that have been newly created by the adoption of new technologies. For instance, a UK bank was forced to re-engineer a number of their backend processes when lockdowns were imposed leaving their Indian back office redundant. There are likely to be significant job losses in India, however they are now looking to add to their technology teams globally to support the new tech enabled processes which they have deployed.

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.

We would be happy to brainstorm with you and see if there is a way in which we can assist.

Description:

Following the turmoil this year, we have been speaking to our clients and candidates across the world to try and make sense of what is happening and what may come next for hiring and managing talent.

Some common themes that have already been reported:

  1. Work From Home (WFH) is here to stay, though perhaps not at 100%
  2. Most companies have imposed hiring freezes and/or are going through painful downsizing or paycuts
  3. There are multiple applicants for most jobs and many of the candidates are vastly overqualified for these roles
  4. Graduates are in a really tough bind at the moment

And so on….

We also found some other trends that are less obvious and sometimes counterintuitive. Here we share some of the more surprising trends that we have been encountering;

Talent - It is getting harder to hire (yes, really!)
Given the earlier comments about multiple applicants for any job being posted, this statement seems a little daft. In reality, what we saw is that many good candidates are not willing to switch jobs at this time. Even those who had been forced to take a pay cut, were willing to stick it out with their current organisation.

Very few employees working with larger organisations and respected brands were willing to consider a change, despite being offered higher salaries. Those who had recently been let go were still wary of taking on a job with lesser known companies and preferred organisations perceived to be more stable.

Trepidation - Employees are worried about WFH
Many articles have predicted how organisations will be forced to allow employees much greater flexibility and freedom in working from home. In reality, many employees want to get back to the office. Apart from the obvious reasons (children, internet, air-conditioning, social interaction etc.) they are also concerned about the impact of WFH on their career prospects. Recent graduates worry about the lack of mentoring and visibility, more senior employees worry about how the next promotion will come through. Worries about job security and lack of contact with superiors were fuelling their desire to get back to the office.

Technology - Driving a new wave of hiring and firing
Despite the headlines around job losses across sectors and organisations, there is an increase in opportunities for positions that have been newly created by the adoption of new technologies. For instance, a UK bank was forced to re-engineer a number of their backend processes when lockdowns were imposed leaving their Indian back office redundant. There are likely to be significant job losses in India, however they are now looking to add to their technology teams globally to support the new tech enabled processes which they have deployed.

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.

We would be happy to brainstorm with you and see if there is a way in which we can assist.

Related Keyphrases:

significant job losses | many good candidates | social interaction etc | multiple applicants | senior employees | possible solutions | many employees | talent management | new technologies | office redundant | surprising trends | service offerings | counterintuitive | obvious reasons | technology teams

Overview

The manufacturing industries in Nigeria is an economic sector that brings approximately 10 percent of total GDP (Gross Domestic Product) each year. Manufacturing activity is concentrated in large cities like Lagos, Port Harcourt, and Ibadan, in the south of the country. Millions of people are involved in producing household goods, consumer products, automobiles, agriculture, mining, cement and building materials etc. The Nigerian manufacturing sector is dominated by the production of cement and building materials, food and beverages, tobacco, chemicals and fertilizers, wood, and textiles. Out of all only 3 subsectors (food & beverage, cement, and textile) account for 77% of manufacturing output generating the greatest value. Also, breweries and flour mills contribute well in the manufacturing sector. 

Performance of the sector

The Nigerian manufacturing sector has been performing well in recent years as compared to previous years. The incentives by the government are also beginning to encourage greater interest, to encourage more output in manufacturing sector the government has been making it cheaper for consumers to purchase locally manufactured goods, making the foreign alternatives prohibitively expensive or totally unavailable through import bans, facilitation of cheaper funding, discriminatory foreign exchange policies, and so on.

Challenges

Manufacturing in Nigeria is beset with quite a few challenges, chief among them is power supply, most firms rely on “emergency” power generators to run seamless operations eventually adding to costs. The country’s physical infrastructural deficiencies are also a major constraint, difficult access to credit, and the cost of imported raw materials and skilled labor being the additional challenges. 

Current Scenario

The global supply chain has been deeply disrupted as China, which is the second largest economy in the world, is a major supplier of inputs for manufacturing companies around the world, Nigeria inclusive. Many manufacturers and service providers in the country are already experiencing acute shortage of raw materials and intermediate inputs. This has implications for capacity utilization, employment generation and retention and adequacy of products’ supply to the domestic market.

Future of manufacturing in Nigeria post COVID19 pandemic

The COVID19 pandemic has already accelerated several consumer trends, what most of us consider normal has already fundamentally shifted. Manufacturers in Nigeria who would understand and act on this new normal will have ample opportunities for growth. The COVID-19 pandemic hit manufacturers in an unexpected and unprecedented way. For the first time in modern Nigerian manufacturing history, demand, supply, and workforce availability are affected globally at the same time. Only those companies that provide and deliver vital goods like personal care, FMCG, beverages, paper and pharmaceutical etc. are struggling to meet demand driven by panic buying while other manufacturers of non-essential items are experiencing dramatic drops in demand and extreme pressure to cut operational costs.

Those countries which were dependent on offshore supplies for basic needs are now seeing the downside. Now, Governments are almost certain to use domestic manufacturing as part of their plan to build up strategic resilience in the aftermath of the current crisis. Hence, there will be ample of opportunities for the people willing to work into manufacturing sector and Nigeria indeed has the population and human capital capabilities. Beyond population, Nigeria needs a critical ingredient to make use of the chance to succeed presented by this pandemic.

Anticipated trends to the industry

Automation will be a key component of the effort to revive domestic manufacturing. Automated manufacturing will not only bring back demand for low-skilled labor but will create many new jobs and opportunities for digitally savvy workers.

Learning from the current manufacturing scenario, manufacturing sector will be undergoing new trends like a more elastic workforce, digitally enabled workplace, differentiated supply chains by customer segment, resilient and distributed IT infrastructure/ systems, more digital channels, and E-commerce platforms.

Job opportunities in the manufacturing sector in Nigeria

With all the above in mind, at Select Global Solutions we anticipate a continuing demand for skilled talent in the manufacturing sector. Furthermore, there will be a greater demand for engineers, automation experts, digital specialist and E-commerce executives. With the growth in demand for basic FMCG products, supply chain experts in the country will be in high demand as well.  

For the latest job opportunities in Nigeria, do check our jobs page on www.selectglobal.co.in

Description:

Overview

The manufacturing industries in Nigeria is an economic sector that brings approximately 10 percent of total GDP (Gross Domestic Product) each year. Manufacturing activity is concentrated in large cities like Lagos, Port Harcourt, and Ibadan, in the south of the country. Millions of people are involved in producing household goods, consumer products, automobiles, agriculture, mining, cement and building materials etc. The Nigerian manufacturing sector is dominated by the production of cement and building materials, food and beverages, tobacco, chemicals and fertilizers, wood, and textiles. Out of all only 3 subsectors (food & beverage, cement, and textile) account for 77% of manufacturing output generating the greatest value. Also, breweries and flour mills contribute well in the manufacturing sector. 

Performance of the sector

The Nigerian manufacturing sector has been performing well in recent years as compared to previous years. The incentives by the government are also beginning to encourage greater interest, to encourage more output in manufacturing sector the government has been making it cheaper for consumers to purchase locally manufactured goods, making the foreign alternatives prohibitively expensive or totally unavailable through import bans, facilitation of cheaper funding, discriminatory foreign exchange policies, and so on.

Challenges

Manufacturing in Nigeria is beset with quite a few challenges, chief among them is power supply, most firms rely on “emergency” power generators to run seamless operations eventually adding to costs. The country’s physical infrastructural deficiencies are also a major constraint, difficult access to credit, and the cost of imported raw materials and skilled labor being the additional challenges. 

Current Scenario

The global supply chain has been deeply disrupted as China, which is the second largest economy in the world, is a major supplier of inputs for manufacturing companies around the world, Nigeria inclusive. Many manufacturers and service providers in the country are already experiencing acute shortage of raw materials and intermediate inputs. This has implications for capacity utilization, employment generation and retention and adequacy of products’ supply to the domestic market.

Future of manufacturing in Nigeria post COVID19 pandemic

The COVID19 pandemic has already accelerated several consumer trends, what most of us consider normal has already fundamentally shifted. Manufacturers in Nigeria who would understand and act on this new normal will have ample opportunities for growth. The COVID-19 pandemic hit manufacturers in an unexpected and unprecedented way. For the first time in modern Nigerian manufacturing history, demand, supply, and workforce availability are affected globally at the same time. Only those companies that provide and deliver vital goods like personal care, FMCG, beverages, paper and pharmaceutical etc. are struggling to meet demand driven by panic buying while other manufacturers of non-essential items are experiencing dramatic drops in demand and extreme pressure to cut operational costs.

Those countries which were dependent on offshore supplies for basic needs are now seeing the downside. Now, Governments are almost certain to use domestic manufacturing as part of their plan to build up strategic resilience in the aftermath of the current crisis. Hence, there will be ample of opportunities for the people willing to work into manufacturing sector and Nigeria indeed has the population and human capital capabilities. Beyond population, Nigeria needs a critical ingredient to make use of the chance to succeed presented by this pandemic.

Anticipated trends to the industry

Automation will be a key component of the effort to revive domestic manufacturing. Automated manufacturing will not only bring back demand for low-skilled labor but will create many new jobs and opportunities for digitally savvy workers.

Learning from the current manufacturing scenario, manufacturing sector will be undergoing new trends like a more elastic workforce, digitally enabled workplace, differentiated supply chains by customer segment, resilient and distributed IT infrastructure/ systems, more digital channels, and E-commerce platforms.

Job opportunities in the manufacturing sector in Nigeria

With all the above in mind, at Select Global Solutions we anticipate a continuing demand for skilled talent in the manufacturing sector. Furthermore, there will be a greater demand for engineers, automation experts, digital specialist and E-commerce executives. With the growth in demand for basic FMCG products, supply chain experts in the country will be in high demand as well.  

For the latest job opportunities in Nigeria, do check our jobs page on www.selectglobal.co.in

Related Keyphrases:

Nigerian manufacturing sector | modern Nigerian manufacturing history | current manufacturing scenario | revive domestic manufacturing | discriminatory foreign exchange policies | use domestic manufacturing | s physical infrastructural deficiencies | manufacturing industries | manufacturing companies | Automated manufacturing | manufacturing output | pandemic hit manufacturers | Nigeria post COVID19 | supply chain experts | several consumer trends

Subrata Dey is an Indian National who has worked for more than 13 Years in India in talent acquisition. During this time, he was focused on senior level hiring across Africa, and over a year ago, he had the opportunity to take his learnings from afar, and take a position on the ground in Kenya. He joined the Safal Group in Kenya, one of Africa’s leading roofing manufacturers, as Group Talent Acquisition Manager. Subrata is both a friend, advisor and a client of Select Global Solutions. We spoke to him recently about how he is finding life as an expat in Kenya.


After moving to Kenya, he found it easy to settle in. He was supported both by his company, his colleagues and former clients. Taking his family to Kenya, including a young son, was at first daunting, but Subrata had visited Kenya in the past to meet clients, so he was able to reassure them and advise them of the environment. He already knew several Indian expats in the country, and prior to moving he and his wife were able to speak to them to get advice on what to expect, what to bring and how to settle their son into a school.


After moving to Nairobi, he developed friendships with other expats, and his wife quickly settled into the community. Subrata’s son joined an international school, and has naturally taken to the new environment and schooling system.


He told us, that the best part of being in Kenya is being able to explore the country at the weekend, enjoy outdoor activities and visit many areas of natural beauty. They take advantage of this unique opportunity as an expat, and have been to mountains, lakes, safari and the beach. 


On the professional front, he is well settled in his new role. He emphasized that Kenya has international influence in the work environment, given the fact that it is a melting pot of various cultures and nationalities.  Communication is a key aspect and people respect each other not because of designation but for the attitude that one carries. “India being a large country with billion plus population, the environment is very competitive and numbers driven.  In this regard, Kenya has a very different ecosystem.” Working in Kenya has given him work-life balance which was missing in India. No phone calls after office hours, more time with the family as the official time is from 8 AM to 5 PM. 


During the time of this pandemic, he feels technology has helped him connect with him his family. Though he does miss out on being with them physically but is virtually well connected.


Subrata is really enjoying expat life, both personally and professionally. Whilst India will always be home, he has learnt and developed in so many different ways, and feels privileged to have had this opportunity.  

Description:

Subrata Dey is an Indian National who has worked for more than 13 Years in India in talent acquisition. During this time, he was focused on senior level hiring across Africa, and over a year ago, he had the opportunity to take his learnings from afar, and take a position on the ground in Kenya. He joined the Safal Group in Kenya, one of Africa’s leading roofing manufacturers, as Group Talent Acquisition Manager. Subrata is both a friend, advisor and a client of Select Global Solutions. We spoke to him recently about how he is finding life as an expat in Kenya.


After moving to Kenya, he found it easy to settle in. He was supported both by his company, his colleagues and former clients. Taking his family to Kenya, including a young son, was at first daunting, but Subrata had visited Kenya in the past to meet clients, so he was able to reassure them and advise them of the environment. He already knew several Indian expats in the country, and prior to moving he and his wife were able to speak to them to get advice on what to expect, what to bring and how to settle their son into a school.


After moving to Nairobi, he developed friendships with other expats, and his wife quickly settled into the community. Subrata’s son joined an international school, and has naturally taken to the new environment and schooling system.


He told us, that the best part of being in Kenya is being able to explore the country at the weekend, enjoy outdoor activities and visit many areas of natural beauty. They take advantage of this unique opportunity as an expat, and have been to mountains, lakes, safari and the beach. 


On the professional front, he is well settled in his new role. He emphasized that Kenya has international influence in the work environment, given the fact that it is a melting pot of various cultures and nationalities.  Communication is a key aspect and people respect each other not because of designation but for the attitude that one carries. “India being a large country with billion plus population, the environment is very competitive and numbers driven.  In this regard, Kenya has a very different ecosystem.” Working in Kenya has given him work-life balance which was missing in India. No phone calls after office hours, more time with the family as the official time is from 8 AM to 5 PM. 


During the time of this pandemic, he feels technology has helped him connect with him his family. Though he does miss out on being with them physically but is virtually well connected.


Subrata is really enjoying expat life, both personally and professionally. Whilst India will always be home, he has learnt and developed in so many different ways, and feels privileged to have had this opportunity.  

Related Keyphrases:

Group Talent Acquisition Manager | international influence | Select Global Solutions | several Indian expats | international school | many different ways | unique opportunity | work environment | new environment | professional front | outdoor activities | feels technology | various cultures | Indian National | official time

Over the past few weeks, as everyone was winding down during the holidays, we had some interesting discussions with senior leaders across the world. Many of them were introspecting on their careers and trying to chart their future paths.

Here are some of the key themes that emerged:

For Senior Leaders in Corporates

  • A desire to spend the next and perhaps final stage of their careers doing something that really excited them rather than continue running on the same treadmill which they had been on for the past few years.
  • To stop answering to someone else and become their own boss, and start on their own.
  • To accept lower earnings and the uncertainty of running their own business so that they could take control over their destiny.

For Owners of Businesses

  • A desire to prepare their organisations for the next generation and take a step back from their responsibilities.
  • The realisation that they had not been able to develop a succession plan within their organisations and that there was a real shortage of senior management who could mentor the youngsters to take over the reins in the future.
  • Being trapped in their current roles and unable to relinquish the responsibilities they were bearing.
  • A conscious recognition that they wanted to get out of the way of the next batch of leaders and that by staying on they risked getting in the way of progress.

Challenges of Change

Whilst many of the individuals we spoke to knew that they wanted to make a change, most of them were struggling to work out how to make the change. Having been consumed by the demands of their jobs, they had been unable to explore how to shift gears and start working on their new projects. The few who had successfully made the transition had all taken deliberate steps to set aside time and leverage their networks to help with the change.

We found that many organisations were reluctant to let their senior leaders move on, even though there was a desire on both sides for a change. This often led to a lose-lose situation where neither party were happy with the status quo, but somehow there was not sufficient impetus to force the change.


Push through to Prosper

It was encouraging to hear that the leaders who had persevered and been able to make the transition were generally happier and more enthusiastic than they had been before. One of the most common comments was that they wished they had taken the plunge much earlier in their lives! They found that they were able to leverage their skills in exciting new sectors and work with very different challenges. Just the change of environment itself was rejuvenating and reinvigorating.


We have been working with a number of senior leaders who are looking to make a change in their careers. If you would like to explore some options, please feel free to reach out and we can help you start the ball rolling!


Select Global Solutions provide Executive Search and Recruitment services to clients across Africa, India and the Middle East. Over the last 10 years we have developed an expertise in multi-cultural recruitment of senior talent across multiple industries. We specialise in sourcing both expatriates and nationals. To find out more about our talent acquisition solutions, get in touch with us at info@selectglobal.co.in 



Description:

Over the past few weeks, as everyone was winding down during the holidays, we had some interesting discussions with senior leaders across the world. Many of them were introspecting on their careers and trying to chart their future paths.

Here are some of the key themes that emerged:

For Senior Leaders in Corporates

  • A desire to spend the next and perhaps final stage of their careers doing something that really excited them rather than continue running on the same treadmill which they had been on for the past few years.
  • To stop answering to someone else and become their own boss, and start on their own.
  • To accept lower earnings and the uncertainty of running their own business so that they could take control over their destiny.

For Owners of Businesses

  • A desire to prepare their organisations for the next generation and take a step back from their responsibilities.
  • The realisation that they had not been able to develop a succession plan within their organisations and that there was a real shortage of senior management who could mentor the youngsters to take over the reins in the future.
  • Being trapped in their current roles and unable to relinquish the responsibilities they were bearing.
  • A conscious recognition that they wanted to get out of the way of the next batch of leaders and that by staying on they risked getting in the way of progress.

Challenges of Change

Whilst many of the individuals we spoke to knew that they wanted to make a change, most of them were struggling to work out how to make the change. Having been consumed by the demands of their jobs, they had been unable to explore how to shift gears and start working on their new projects. The few who had successfully made the transition had all taken deliberate steps to set aside time and leverage their networks to help with the change.

We found that many organisations were reluctant to let their senior leaders move on, even though there was a desire on both sides for a change. This often led to a lose-lose situation where neither party were happy with the status quo, but somehow there was not sufficient impetus to force the change.


Push through to Prosper

It was encouraging to hear that the leaders who had persevered and been able to make the transition were generally happier and more enthusiastic than they had been before. One of the most common comments was that they wished they had taken the plunge much earlier in their lives! They found that they were able to leverage their skills in exciting new sectors and work with very different challenges. Just the change of environment itself was rejuvenating and reinvigorating.


We have been working with a number of senior leaders who are looking to make a change in their careers. If you would like to explore some options, please feel free to reach out and we can help you start the ball rolling!


Select Global Solutions provide Executive Search and Recruitment services to clients across Africa, India and the Middle East. Over the last 10 years we have developed an expertise in multi-cultural recruitment of senior talent across multiple industries. We specialise in sourcing both expatriates and nationals. To find out more about our talent acquisition solutions, get in touch with us at info@selectglobal.co.in 



Related Keyphrases:

talent acquisition solutions | interesting discussions | senior leaders | senior management | many organisations | conscious recognition | Recruitment services | different challenges | BusinessesA desire | multiple industries | CorporatesA desire | sufficient impetus | senior talent | next generation | Executive Search

In our last article, we looked at how to manage your reputation through the recruitment process in order to attract better candidates.

A number of our clients are facing an equally difficult challenge as they resize their organisations to face new economic realities. How do you maintain your company reputation whilst downsizing?

Can a company fire well to hire well?

There are multiple internal and external company stakeholders to consider, as well as other interest parties such as competitors, regulators, etc. A poorly designed and executed retrenchment exercise can be tremendously damaging to the company's brand. On the other hand, companies who manage the process well can turn a potential liability into a long term asset.

Employees
We have seen various strategies used by companies to ensure that employees who are being let go continue to view the organisation positively and remain brand ambassadors for years to come. Apart from the financial compensation associated with redundancy, companies should also think about the other softer aspects associated with the retrenchment.

A common theme amongst all the strategies, is ensuring that there is a fair and transparent process to handle the employees’ exits. Some of the critical aspects of ensuring that the process is perceived to be fair are;

  1. Communication - One of the most critical aspects of handling the exit well is to have an effective communication process in place. Having a frank and honest conversation with the employees about the reasons for the retrenchment will go a long way to ensuring that trust is maintained.
  2. Timing – in the case of a redundancy or retrenchment exercise, giving an employee sufficient notice is vital to ensuring that they maintain some goodwill towards the company.
  3. Support – if at all possible, helping employees find alternate employment either through informal networks or where possible through outplacement services helps minimise the pain of the transition. Many companies also provide access to coaches to assist employees during their transition and help them get over the immediate shock of the retrenchment to focus on their next opportunity.

Outsiders
Managing the narrative with external stakeholders as well as the perception amongst consumers and competitors is equally important to handling a large retrenchment well.

Competitors will use the period of uncertainty created by the retrenchment to try and poach talent. Given the general uncertainty created within the organisation during a retrenchment exercise, employees are particularly vulnerable to an approach at this time, and it is important to ensure that the employees being retained are reassured during this time.

The image of the organisation amongst customers and the general public is also important to manage during the retrenchment process. For example, it may be better to have one significant round of retrenchments rather than multiple smaller rounds given the potential for bad news to keep circulating in the press.

We have assisted a number of organisations who have planned to downsize by engaging with the employees who are being let go to see if alternative roles can be found for them. Regardless of whether these efforts bear fruit, these initiatives have helped maintain the organisation’s brand and eventually allowed them to continue to attract good talent despite their short term challenges.

If you find yourself facing these challenges, please feel free to reach out and we can discuss how we may be able to help.



This article is written by Nikunj Shah, former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder of Select Global Solutions. 

Select Global Solutions provide Executive Search and Recruitment services to clients across Africa, India and the Middle East. Over the last 10 years we have developed an expertise in multi-cultural recruitment of senior talent across multiple industries. We specialise in sourcing both expatriates and nationals. To find out more about our talent acquisition solutions, get in touch with us at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Description:

In our last article, we looked at how to manage your reputation through the recruitment process in order to attract better candidates.

A number of our clients are facing an equally difficult challenge as they resize their organisations to face new economic realities. How do you maintain your company reputation whilst downsizing?

Can a company fire well to hire well?

There are multiple internal and external company stakeholders to consider, as well as other interest parties such as competitors, regulators, etc. A poorly designed and executed retrenchment exercise can be tremendously damaging to the company's brand. On the other hand, companies who manage the process well can turn a potential liability into a long term asset.

Employees
We have seen various strategies used by companies to ensure that employees who are being let go continue to view the organisation positively and remain brand ambassadors for years to come. Apart from the financial compensation associated with redundancy, companies should also think about the other softer aspects associated with the retrenchment.

A common theme amongst all the strategies, is ensuring that there is a fair and transparent process to handle the employees’ exits. Some of the critical aspects of ensuring that the process is perceived to be fair are;

  1. Communication - One of the most critical aspects of handling the exit well is to have an effective communication process in place. Having a frank and honest conversation with the employees about the reasons for the retrenchment will go a long way to ensuring that trust is maintained.
  2. Timing – in the case of a redundancy or retrenchment exercise, giving an employee sufficient notice is vital to ensuring that they maintain some goodwill towards the company.
  3. Support – if at all possible, helping employees find alternate employment either through informal networks or where possible through outplacement services helps minimise the pain of the transition. Many companies also provide access to coaches to assist employees during their transition and help them get over the immediate shock of the retrenchment to focus on their next opportunity.

Outsiders
Managing the narrative with external stakeholders as well as the perception amongst consumers and competitors is equally important to handling a large retrenchment well.

Competitors will use the period of uncertainty created by the retrenchment to try and poach talent. Given the general uncertainty created within the organisation during a retrenchment exercise, employees are particularly vulnerable to an approach at this time, and it is important to ensure that the employees being retained are reassured during this time.

The image of the organisation amongst customers and the general public is also important to manage during the retrenchment process. For example, it may be better to have one significant round of retrenchments rather than multiple smaller rounds given the potential for bad news to keep circulating in the press.

We have assisted a number of organisations who have planned to downsize by engaging with the employees who are being let go to see if alternative roles can be found for them. Regardless of whether these efforts bear fruit, these initiatives have helped maintain the organisation’s brand and eventually allowed them to continue to attract good talent despite their short term challenges.

If you find yourself facing these challenges, please feel free to reach out and we can discuss how we may be able to help.



This article is written by Nikunj Shah, former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder of Select Global Solutions. 

Select Global Solutions provide Executive Search and Recruitment services to clients across Africa, India and the Middle East. Over the last 10 years we have developed an expertise in multi-cultural recruitment of senior talent across multiple industries. We specialise in sourcing both expatriates and nationals. To find out more about our talent acquisition solutions, get in touch with us at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Related Keyphrases:

effective communication process | external company stakeholders | organisation amongst customers | retrenchment process | talent acquisition solutions | retrenchment exercise | company reputation whilst | perception amongst consumers | large retrenchment | employee sufficient notice | Select Global Solutions | recruitment process | transparent process | external stakeholders | financial compensation

In the war for talent, are you struggling to attract the right candidates? Despite a slowdown in many emerging economies, a number of our clients are still struggling to attract the right candidates. A key reason appears to be the image and reputation of the company amongst the candidate pool.

As Warren Buffet said:
It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you will do things differently"

In this age of instant communication, candidates quickly learn about any issues at a company. Forums such as Glassdoor, Whatsapp groups and other forms of social media now make it very easy for a disgruntled individual to share negative opinions.

As everyone knows, bad news gets the most press!

Organisations need to actively think about how they treat their potential, future, current and past employees. As a recruiter, we often come across clients who are battling to overcome negative perceptions about their organisation in order to find talent.

Image
The challenges for a company start with the recruitment process. When a role is first advertised or a search initiated, the way in which the position is promoted itself creates an opportunity to frame the company’s reputation. A poorly drafted advert can lead to assumptions about the professionalism of the organisation. Companies employing multiple recruitment consultants risk damaging their reputation if a candidate receives multiple calls from multiple recruiters, as this leads to a perception of desperation.

Speed
The speed at which a company proceeds with hiring can also affect their reputation. Once a candidate has been engaged it is imperative to conclude on the process and close the loop in a reasonable period of time.

In one instance, the inability of the company to conclude on a role created its own feedback loop, and future candidates were reluctant to apply as they worried why the role was taking so long to fill!

Feedback
Many organisations do not have processes in place to provide feedback to candidates who have applied. Whilst the company focusses on the few shortlisted candidates, the rejected many rarely receive any communication, let alone constructive feedback on why their candidature was not taken forward. These spurned candidates often have reason to vent their frustrations out publicly and nowadays can do so anonymously so have little to fear in terms of repercussions.

These reputational effects linger for long periods of time, and once established it becomes an uphill battle to change perceptions.

A client in a niche industry found that some disgruntled ex-employees had spread such a negative image about them, that even years after the employee left, they were still unable to attract quality candidates.

Over the years, we have found many creative ways in which to help clients overcome these challenges.

If you find yourself facing these challenges, please feel free to reach out and we can discuss how we may be able to help.

Description:

In the war for talent, are you struggling to attract the right candidates? Despite a slowdown in many emerging economies, a number of our clients are still struggling to attract the right candidates. A key reason appears to be the image and reputation of the company amongst the candidate pool.

As Warren Buffet said:
It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you will do things differently"

In this age of instant communication, candidates quickly learn about any issues at a company. Forums such as Glassdoor, Whatsapp groups and other forms of social media now make it very easy for a disgruntled individual to share negative opinions.

As everyone knows, bad news gets the most press!

Organisations need to actively think about how they treat their potential, future, current and past employees. As a recruiter, we often come across clients who are battling to overcome negative perceptions about their organisation in order to find talent.

Image
The challenges for a company start with the recruitment process. When a role is first advertised or a search initiated, the way in which the position is promoted itself creates an opportunity to frame the company’s reputation. A poorly drafted advert can lead to assumptions about the professionalism of the organisation. Companies employing multiple recruitment consultants risk damaging their reputation if a candidate receives multiple calls from multiple recruiters, as this leads to a perception of desperation.

Speed
The speed at which a company proceeds with hiring can also affect their reputation. Once a candidate has been engaged it is imperative to conclude on the process and close the loop in a reasonable period of time.

In one instance, the inability of the company to conclude on a role created its own feedback loop, and future candidates were reluctant to apply as they worried why the role was taking so long to fill!

Feedback
Many organisations do not have processes in place to provide feedback to candidates who have applied. Whilst the company focusses on the few shortlisted candidates, the rejected many rarely receive any communication, let alone constructive feedback on why their candidature was not taken forward. These spurned candidates often have reason to vent their frustrations out publicly and nowadays can do so anonymously so have little to fear in terms of repercussions.

These reputational effects linger for long periods of time, and once established it becomes an uphill battle to change perceptions.

A client in a niche industry found that some disgruntled ex-employees had spread such a negative image about them, that even years after the employee left, they were still unable to attract quality candidates.

Over the years, we have found many creative ways in which to help clients overcome these challenges.

If you find yourself facing these challenges, please feel free to reach out and we can discuss how we may be able to help.

Related Keyphrases:

multiple recruitment consultants | overcome negative perceptions | future candidates | right candidates | constructive feedback | disgruntled individual | instant communication | multiple recruiters | recruitment process | company amongst | reputational effects | many creative ways | clients overcome | reasonable period | candidates

As everyone returns from the summer break, enlightened leaders will have taken the opportunity to test out the resilience of their organisations in their absence and identify high performing team members to groom for succession. (For those who didn’t – check out https://bit.ly/2lE5xRn for our thoughts on why taking a break is so important for leaders and their organisation)

Rested and armed with these insights, leaders can start putting together their succession plans. All they have to do now is prepare the future leaders for their new roles through training, mentoring and coaching, plan a managed handover and voila! It all sounds so simple in theory.

Unfortunately, as so many of our clients testify, the reality is rarely so straightforward. From multinationals to owner managed organisations, succession planning seems to be one of the most difficult problems facing leaders.

Why is succession planning so difficult in practice?
In our experience, the biggest problem seems to be ourselves – human beings are complicated, and these complexities lead to multiple challenges.

Fear
In many organisations, the first hurdle is often the person who needs to be succeeded. The desire to hang on, the fear of what the future holds, the loss of position, power or prestige – all of these lead to a reluctance to let go. The consequences of this are that would-be successors are often frustrated by the length of time it takes to be given greater responsibilities or by continued meddling once their predecessor has supposedly vacated the role. The results of this can be very toxic and at the extreme,  lead to the successor departing. It is often as important to get a coach to help the old guard to move on. For example, moving the senior to a new location often helps…

Opportunity
In a world where talent is so mobile, the second challenge results from potential successors bailing out before they take on the responsibilities for which they are groomed. Having invested so much time and energy in developing this talent, what do you do when they find better opportunities? Few organisations have limitless resources to have backups for their backups!

Politics
Corporate and boardroom politics are another factor to consider. Take the example of the Tata Group in India. The Tata Group had a well-known succession plan for Ratan Tata. Noel Tata had been groomed for the role for years. Unfortunately, as events unfolded and family dynamics kicked in, he was pushed aside and the job given to Cyrus Mistry. As history shows us, this did not end well, and eventually Ratan Tata came back as Cyrus was pushed out.

Cost
Another challenge comes from the financial implications of succession planning. For organisations trying to maximise profits, an investment in building a talent pipeline immediately hits the bottom line. How do you justify having a few extra highly paid senior managers, when the organisation is looking for efficiency gains everywhere else? (Wouldn’t it be nice if you could capitalise these expenses?)
 
For organisations with small teams spread out globally, the problem becomes even more acute. Adding one or two extra people to a large centralised team can be managed. The costs of additional manpower in each location would be prohibitive, nor can you somehow groom management centrally in such an organisation.

Uncertainty
Finally, organisations operate in a dynamic environment. Does the new guard need the same type of skills and experiences as the old guard? What happens if a recession hits in the middle of an expansion? Suddenly, the type of leadership required is different – have the leaders in waiting been adequately equipped to deal with the new realities?

So, if you are facing a challenge with succession planning, don’t be too hard on yourself. Chances are, everyone around you is going through similar pains!

Description:

As everyone returns from the summer break, enlightened leaders will have taken the opportunity to test out the resilience of their organisations in their absence and identify high performing team members to groom for succession. (For those who didn’t – check out https://bit.ly/2lE5xRn for our thoughts on why taking a break is so important for leaders and their organisation)

Rested and armed with these insights, leaders can start putting together their succession plans. All they have to do now is prepare the future leaders for their new roles through training, mentoring and coaching, plan a managed handover and voila! It all sounds so simple in theory.

Unfortunately, as so many of our clients testify, the reality is rarely so straightforward. From multinationals to owner managed organisations, succession planning seems to be one of the most difficult problems facing leaders.

Why is succession planning so difficult in practice?
In our experience, the biggest problem seems to be ourselves – human beings are complicated, and these complexities lead to multiple challenges.

Fear
In many organisations, the first hurdle is often the person who needs to be succeeded. The desire to hang on, the fear of what the future holds, the loss of position, power or prestige – all of these lead to a reluctance to let go. The consequences of this are that would-be successors are often frustrated by the length of time it takes to be given greater responsibilities or by continued meddling once their predecessor has supposedly vacated the role. The results of this can be very toxic and at the extreme,  lead to the successor departing. It is often as important to get a coach to help the old guard to move on. For example, moving the senior to a new location often helps…

Opportunity
In a world where talent is so mobile, the second challenge results from potential successors bailing out before they take on the responsibilities for which they are groomed. Having invested so much time and energy in developing this talent, what do you do when they find better opportunities? Few organisations have limitless resources to have backups for their backups!

Politics
Corporate and boardroom politics are another factor to consider. Take the example of the Tata Group in India. The Tata Group had a well-known succession plan for Ratan Tata. Noel Tata had been groomed for the role for years. Unfortunately, as events unfolded and family dynamics kicked in, he was pushed aside and the job given to Cyrus Mistry. As history shows us, this did not end well, and eventually Ratan Tata came back as Cyrus was pushed out.

Cost
Another challenge comes from the financial implications of succession planning. For organisations trying to maximise profits, an investment in building a talent pipeline immediately hits the bottom line. How do you justify having a few extra highly paid senior managers, when the organisation is looking for efficiency gains everywhere else? (Wouldn’t it be nice if you could capitalise these expenses?)
 
For organisations with small teams spread out globally, the problem becomes even more acute. Adding one or two extra people to a large centralised team can be managed. The costs of additional manpower in each location would be prohibitive, nor can you somehow groom management centrally in such an organisation.

Uncertainty
Finally, organisations operate in a dynamic environment. Does the new guard need the same type of skills and experiences as the old guard? What happens if a recession hits in the middle of an expansion? Suddenly, the type of leadership required is different – have the leaders in waiting been adequately equipped to deal with the new realities?

So, if you are facing a challenge with succession planning, don’t be too hard on yourself. Chances are, everyone around you is going through similar pains!

Related Keyphrases:

high performing team members | second challenge results | succession planning | difficult problems facing | many organisations | find better opportunities | large centralised team | financial implications | succession plans | potential successors | future leaders | new guard need | organisations | dynamic environment | limitless resources

Summer has arrived. Time to wind down, spend time with family and friends, head for the hills, and set the Out of Office message for a couple of weeks as you recharge and refresh, unburdened by the worries of work. Having left your work in your colleagues’ capable hands, you relax, knowing that all will be in order on your return.

Is this truly your reality? Actually, you are probably still connected, checking emails and messages, and generally still engaged with whatever is going on back at work. The concern that the wheels may fall off the bus in your absence, or at the very least a need to know what is happening in the background, mean that you are unable to switch off completely. This inability to let go has many unintended consequences, but are you really indispensable?

Apart from the negative impact on your well-being, which numerous studies have already explored, the inability to let go may also affect organisational performance both in the short and long term. In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader.

In the short term, knowing that you are available at any time, allows your team to avoid taking decisions and abdicate responsibility. By staying in touch, you send a signal that you still wish to be involved, despite not being around. Allowing the team to take ownership of decisions in your absence could have some significant benefits.

Firstly, the team dynamics in your absence could help identify the high potential candidates in your organisation. Which of the team stepped up and took on extra responsibility? How well did they cope without your direction? Who took the time to slack off? After a couple of weeks away, it is often easier to determine how the individuals in the team are all performing.

If problems do arise, these could help identify gaps in your strategy or organisation, which can then be addressed. Some organisations enforce a compulsory two week holiday annually, which allows them to check that their systems are working well and that the organisation is not overly reliant on one individual.

In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader. Career growth demands that there is someone else able to fill your shoes. Building a team that is able to perform without you is a great way to free yourself for bigger challenges.

So, take the plunge and have a break – not only have you earnt it, your team needs it!


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions, an Executive Search and Recruitment Firm providing solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj and the team about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in

Description:

Summer has arrived. Time to wind down, spend time with family and friends, head for the hills, and set the Out of Office message for a couple of weeks as you recharge and refresh, unburdened by the worries of work. Having left your work in your colleagues’ capable hands, you relax, knowing that all will be in order on your return.

Is this truly your reality? Actually, you are probably still connected, checking emails and messages, and generally still engaged with whatever is going on back at work. The concern that the wheels may fall off the bus in your absence, or at the very least a need to know what is happening in the background, mean that you are unable to switch off completely. This inability to let go has many unintended consequences, but are you really indispensable?

Apart from the negative impact on your well-being, which numerous studies have already explored, the inability to let go may also affect organisational performance both in the short and long term. In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader.

In the short term, knowing that you are available at any time, allows your team to avoid taking decisions and abdicate responsibility. By staying in touch, you send a signal that you still wish to be involved, despite not being around. Allowing the team to take ownership of decisions in your absence could have some significant benefits.

Firstly, the team dynamics in your absence could help identify the high potential candidates in your organisation. Which of the team stepped up and took on extra responsibility? How well did they cope without your direction? Who took the time to slack off? After a couple of weeks away, it is often easier to determine how the individuals in the team are all performing.

If problems do arise, these could help identify gaps in your strategy or organisation, which can then be addressed. Some organisations enforce a compulsory two week holiday annually, which allows them to check that their systems are working well and that the organisation is not overly reliant on one individual.

In the long run, this could impact your career and growth potential as a leader. Career growth demands that there is someone else able to fill your shoes. Building a team that is able to perform without you is a great way to free yourself for bigger challenges.

So, take the plunge and have a break – not only have you earnt it, your team needs it!


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions, an Executive Search and Recruitment Firm providing solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj and the team about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in

Related Keyphrases:

many unintended consequences | compulsory two week holiday | high potential candidates | organisational performance | Select Global Solutions | extra responsibility | growth potential | talent requirements | team dynamics | Datum Recruitment | negative impact | Recruitment Firm | Emerging Markets | Executive Search | numerous studies

When you are hiring to fill a role, how do you screen for attitude?
 
Leadership blogs and management guides are full of advice on how to hire the best talent. A multitude of articles have been written about how attitude matters more than simply having the technical skills for the job.  Successful recruiters wax lyrical about finding hidden gems during the recruitment process.
 
As the story goes, despite the candidate having a terrible resume, these enlightened leaders identify some innate characteristic in the candidate and offer them a job on the spot. Over the years this individual turns out to be their most valuable employee, repays the opportunity they were given by performing miracles, and single-handedly drives the organisation to performance Nirvana!
 
Beyond providing inspiration, do these tales really hold true in real life? How can you find these diamonds in the rough?


Are recruiters really enlightened, or is there still a ‘tick box’ exercise in hiring?


Our experience of the reality is far more nuanced. Due to time constraints and the sheer volume of applicants for certain positions, most recruiters will filter candidates initially on simple criteria such as educational qualifications, previous roles and organisations a candidate has worked at, etc.
 
Very few organisations can afford to spend the time to interview all candidates and invest in face to face meetings to ascertain if an ‘off-beat’ candidate has the potential to be a star performer.


Typically, recruiters are under pressure to close roles, and incentivised to reduce the turn around time for hires. They have NO motivation to try and find candidates who are out of the ordinary. Can they really afford to take the risk of placing someone who didn’t meet the candidate profile, but has a slim chance of being a star performer?


Do Automated Tracking Systems (ATS) find the best talent?


An ATS, especially those now using some sort of machine learning to filter candidates, will tend to reject anyone who does not fit the prescribed job description and candidate profile and thus reduces the probability of anyone from a different background of getting through the initial screening round.


As the in-built bias in the recruitment process continues to reinforce itself through multiple iterations in the feedback loop, the risk is that the diversity of candidates shortlisted, reduces over time.

So, how does an organisation ensure that they can avoid these traps and bring in the diversity in talent that powers greater performance?  One CEO we met conducts all campus hiring personally and takes the time to interview all the applicants. How many others would have the time to do this?


There is clearly no simple answer, and the best solution will depend on the seniority of the hire, the size of the organisation and the role. Getting a recruitment consultant on board who understands the organisation’s goals, the culture and has an ability to think outside the box, may help solve this conundrum.


We are constantly striving to find unique, diverse talent for our most progressive clients.  We get to the heart of what a candidate is about.


To find out more about how we can help you with your talent acquisition requirements, get in touch.


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions in Executive Search and Recruitment solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in


Description:

When you are hiring to fill a role, how do you screen for attitude?
 
Leadership blogs and management guides are full of advice on how to hire the best talent. A multitude of articles have been written about how attitude matters more than simply having the technical skills for the job.  Successful recruiters wax lyrical about finding hidden gems during the recruitment process.
 
As the story goes, despite the candidate having a terrible resume, these enlightened leaders identify some innate characteristic in the candidate and offer them a job on the spot. Over the years this individual turns out to be their most valuable employee, repays the opportunity they were given by performing miracles, and single-handedly drives the organisation to performance Nirvana!
 
Beyond providing inspiration, do these tales really hold true in real life? How can you find these diamonds in the rough?


Are recruiters really enlightened, or is there still a ‘tick box’ exercise in hiring?


Our experience of the reality is far more nuanced. Due to time constraints and the sheer volume of applicants for certain positions, most recruiters will filter candidates initially on simple criteria such as educational qualifications, previous roles and organisations a candidate has worked at, etc.
 
Very few organisations can afford to spend the time to interview all candidates and invest in face to face meetings to ascertain if an ‘off-beat’ candidate has the potential to be a star performer.


Typically, recruiters are under pressure to close roles, and incentivised to reduce the turn around time for hires. They have NO motivation to try and find candidates who are out of the ordinary. Can they really afford to take the risk of placing someone who didn’t meet the candidate profile, but has a slim chance of being a star performer?


Do Automated Tracking Systems (ATS) find the best talent?


An ATS, especially those now using some sort of machine learning to filter candidates, will tend to reject anyone who does not fit the prescribed job description and candidate profile and thus reduces the probability of anyone from a different background of getting through the initial screening round.


As the in-built bias in the recruitment process continues to reinforce itself through multiple iterations in the feedback loop, the risk is that the diversity of candidates shortlisted, reduces over time.

So, how does an organisation ensure that they can avoid these traps and bring in the diversity in talent that powers greater performance?  One CEO we met conducts all campus hiring personally and takes the time to interview all the applicants. How many others would have the time to do this?


There is clearly no simple answer, and the best solution will depend on the seniority of the hire, the size of the organisation and the role. Getting a recruitment consultant on board who understands the organisation’s goals, the culture and has an ability to think outside the box, may help solve this conundrum.


We are constantly striving to find unique, diverse talent for our most progressive clients.  We get to the heart of what a candidate is about.


To find out more about how we can help you with your talent acquisition requirements, get in touch.


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions in Executive Search and Recruitment solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in


Related Keyphrases:

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A shocking number of senior managers across emerging markets have suddenly found themselves unemployed. In regions where top talent is so scarce, it is amazing to find so many candidates who are struggling to find another job despite having impressive resumes and experience in leading companies. These candidates seem to be caught in the Top Talent Trap

 

Fat at the top?

One of the main causes of the lack of opportunity for senior managers is the withdrawal or downsizing of many multinationals from the region. Multinationals entered the market and quickly created a bonanza for employees as they poached candidates from local organisations and bid up salaries. With multiple employment offers, candidates found themselves attracting higher and higher salaries as companies struggled to hang on to their hard won talent. Despite the resulting cost pressures, companies accepted the impact on profitability, by convincing themselves that it would all be worth it in the long run.
 
Unfortunately, the recent economic downturn has led to a further deterioration in performance and a rapid rethink of prospects in the region. Faced with strong local competition, which is often owner managed and leaner, multinationals have quickly realised the need to rationalise their cost structures in order to compete.

The war for talent has quickly turned into a bloodbath as entire layers of the organisation are cut. Gone are the regional level managers, and companies have returned to country level management reporting directly to their head offices in an effort to stem losses by cutting costs.

 

Overpaid senior managers?

A number of senior managers with good experience still find themselves out of a job months after being retrenched or resigning. This is due to the mismatch between their last compensation package and the current market opportunities. When the multinationals entered new markets such as Africa in the early part of the decade, salaries for the lucky few ballooned as they were headhunted and offered substantial increments to switch jobs. As the need for talent intensified, salaries were bid up and soon reached stratospheric levels. Unfortunately, when the tide turned these very same stars found themselves left high and dry, as the jobs disappeared and the companies left behind found their packages to be unaffordable.  With salaries having been bid up in the past, companies have also realised that cutting a handful of senior managers from the organisation has a much greater impact on costs than trying to reduce workers at lower levels.

Many of the affected managers that we have recently spoken to, have expressed a willingness to take a reduction in compensation.  However employers are naturally cautious, fearing that anyone taking a cut will likely continue to be on the look out for better opportunities and therefore unlikely to be a stable hire. 

There are clearly ways to mitigate these risks and in our view this is the time for employers to take advantage of the availability of so much talent.

If you are looking for some great candidates, then feel free to reach out and we can help work with you to bridge the gap in expectations to find a win-win solution for both parties. 


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions in Executive Search and Recruitment solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Description:

A shocking number of senior managers across emerging markets have suddenly found themselves unemployed. In regions where top talent is so scarce, it is amazing to find so many candidates who are struggling to find another job despite having impressive resumes and experience in leading companies. These candidates seem to be caught in the Top Talent Trap

 

Fat at the top?

One of the main causes of the lack of opportunity for senior managers is the withdrawal or downsizing of many multinationals from the region. Multinationals entered the market and quickly created a bonanza for employees as they poached candidates from local organisations and bid up salaries. With multiple employment offers, candidates found themselves attracting higher and higher salaries as companies struggled to hang on to their hard won talent. Despite the resulting cost pressures, companies accepted the impact on profitability, by convincing themselves that it would all be worth it in the long run.
 
Unfortunately, the recent economic downturn has led to a further deterioration in performance and a rapid rethink of prospects in the region. Faced with strong local competition, which is often owner managed and leaner, multinationals have quickly realised the need to rationalise their cost structures in order to compete.

The war for talent has quickly turned into a bloodbath as entire layers of the organisation are cut. Gone are the regional level managers, and companies have returned to country level management reporting directly to their head offices in an effort to stem losses by cutting costs.

 

Overpaid senior managers?

A number of senior managers with good experience still find themselves out of a job months after being retrenched or resigning. This is due to the mismatch between their last compensation package and the current market opportunities. When the multinationals entered new markets such as Africa in the early part of the decade, salaries for the lucky few ballooned as they were headhunted and offered substantial increments to switch jobs. As the need for talent intensified, salaries were bid up and soon reached stratospheric levels. Unfortunately, when the tide turned these very same stars found themselves left high and dry, as the jobs disappeared and the companies left behind found their packages to be unaffordable.  With salaries having been bid up in the past, companies have also realised that cutting a handful of senior managers from the organisation has a much greater impact on costs than trying to reduce workers at lower levels.

Many of the affected managers that we have recently spoken to, have expressed a willingness to take a reduction in compensation.  However employers are naturally cautious, fearing that anyone taking a cut will likely continue to be on the look out for better opportunities and therefore unlikely to be a stable hire. 

There are clearly ways to mitigate these risks and in our view this is the time for employers to take advantage of the availability of so much talent.

If you are looking for some great candidates, then feel free to reach out and we can help work with you to bridge the gap in expectations to find a win-win solution for both parties. 


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions in Executive Search and Recruitment solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Related Keyphrases:

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The Long Service Award. Cherished by organisations as a sign of how great they are as employers. Sought after by employees as a recognition of their loyalty to the company (and hopefully to get a gold watch). Lauded by leaders as a sign of their excellent people management skills. But are companies and employees doing themselves a disservice by failing to part ways? Is it time to retire the long service award?

In the past, the loyalty of an individual to a company and vice versa has been measured primarily by their length of service in the company. However, in the age of millennials, is the longevity of an individual in the company really a good barometer of their loyalty?

As a leading HR professional said to me recently;


“the workforce is getting younger and younger, and for this population it is not considered a “great” thing to work for the same organization for years and to work one’s way up the ranks.  They will move whenever and wherever an opportunity presents itself -looking for the fastest way up the career ladder.  So we may have to re-think what loyalty looks like in the modern day workplace – can it be measured purely by length of service?”


There are clearly advantages of retaining the best individuals in a company for longer periods – lower recruitment costs, more committed employees, improved company morale, and hopefully a better organisational performance. However, are employees staying in the organisation because they are loyal, or simply because either they are too lazy to move or feel unable to find a better role outside? Are they staying simply because they don’t feel there is anywhere else for them to go?
 

Companies that have low levels of churn and very stable workforces are often admired for their ability to retain talent. On the other hand, are employees who jump ship every couple of years really disloyal, or do they allow for a continuous refreshment of ideas and enhancement of energy in the organisation? As the senior HR professional we spoke to mentioned:
 

“On the flip side, there are also those organisations that have become terribly risk-averse and do not want to take the risk of hiring new employees… one would say they are exceedingly loyal to their employees.  The employee turnover rates in those organisations are extremely low, which in turn leaves no room for new talent to come in and breathe fresh air into the organization”

 

In addition to the lack of room for new talent, the organisations with a very stable workforce also become unattractive to new talent. If there is no churn in the management structure of the organisation, where do employees find opportunities for career progression? In many companies, it would make sense to retire some of the older workers in order to attract fresh talent who could bring in new ideas and new energy to the organisation.

 

A number of our clients are increasingly struggling to find a balance between loyalty and performance in the organisation. How do leaders manage the very different behaviours between older workers and millenials? What is the right time for an employee to move on from a company? If employees are stuck in their roles, where are the opportunities for advancement amongst the younger workforce?

There is clearly no simple answer to the above questions, however it pays for leaders to think through the choices that they are making and understand the costs and benefits of each choice they make.

Description:

The Long Service Award. Cherished by organisations as a sign of how great they are as employers. Sought after by employees as a recognition of their loyalty to the company (and hopefully to get a gold watch). Lauded by leaders as a sign of their excellent people management skills. But are companies and employees doing themselves a disservice by failing to part ways? Is it time to retire the long service award?

In the past, the loyalty of an individual to a company and vice versa has been measured primarily by their length of service in the company. However, in the age of millennials, is the longevity of an individual in the company really a good barometer of their loyalty?

As a leading HR professional said to me recently;


“the workforce is getting younger and younger, and for this population it is not considered a “great” thing to work for the same organization for years and to work one’s way up the ranks.  They will move whenever and wherever an opportunity presents itself -looking for the fastest way up the career ladder.  So we may have to re-think what loyalty looks like in the modern day workplace – can it be measured purely by length of service?”


There are clearly advantages of retaining the best individuals in a company for longer periods – lower recruitment costs, more committed employees, improved company morale, and hopefully a better organisational performance. However, are employees staying in the organisation because they are loyal, or simply because either they are too lazy to move or feel unable to find a better role outside? Are they staying simply because they don’t feel there is anywhere else for them to go?
 

Companies that have low levels of churn and very stable workforces are often admired for their ability to retain talent. On the other hand, are employees who jump ship every couple of years really disloyal, or do they allow for a continuous refreshment of ideas and enhancement of energy in the organisation? As the senior HR professional we spoke to mentioned:
 

“On the flip side, there are also those organisations that have become terribly risk-averse and do not want to take the risk of hiring new employees… one would say they are exceedingly loyal to their employees.  The employee turnover rates in those organisations are extremely low, which in turn leaves no room for new talent to come in and breathe fresh air into the organization”

 

In addition to the lack of room for new talent, the organisations with a very stable workforce also become unattractive to new talent. If there is no churn in the management structure of the organisation, where do employees find opportunities for career progression? In many companies, it would make sense to retire some of the older workers in order to attract fresh talent who could bring in new ideas and new energy to the organisation.

 

A number of our clients are increasingly struggling to find a balance between loyalty and performance in the organisation. How do leaders manage the very different behaviours between older workers and millenials? What is the right time for an employee to move on from a company? If employees are stuck in their roles, where are the opportunities for advancement amongst the younger workforce?

There is clearly no simple answer to the above questions, however it pays for leaders to think through the choices that they are making and understand the costs and benefits of each choice they make.

Related Keyphrases:

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In our recent discussions with clients and candidates, an interesting pattern is emerging which may have some very serious consequences for companies' talent acquisition plans and for the careers of senior management.

Following years of robust growth in emerging markets, the war for talent amongst businesses resulted in boom times for employees. Skilled workers were constantly being headhunted as companies tried desperately to maintain their talent pool as they scaled. This led to frequent job changes and rapid increases in remuneration as employees took advantage of the environment. One of the biggest complaints we heard was about the lack of loyalty amongst their workers.
 
As economies have started to recover, companies are once again looking to rebuild their talent pools. However, they are wary of employing individuals who were previously moving from one organisation to another. On the other hand, employees are wary of taking up assignments with organisations that until recently were still reducing headcount. Hence, despite the number of excellent candidates in the market, and a number of very interesting opportunities, many roles are still left unfilled as the mutual risk aversion leads to reluctance from both sides to close the deal.
 
Recently however, companies in emerging markets have been faced with a number of headwinds. Economic growth is falling in a number of countries due to both local and external factors such as elections, fiscal tightening by governments and weak macroeconomic conditions.

Faced with these challenges a number of companies have resorted to downsizing programmes in order to maintain competitiveness. Many employees have found themselves suddenly unemployed. In a few cases, redundancies have taken place in only a few months following the appointment of the employee in the organisation.

These abrupt changes have left many workers scarred and therefore far more risk averse. Those still in employment have also been affected as they hear the news of their friends losing their jobs. There are a number of very highly qualified and talented people who are suddenly looking for work. At the same time, those currently employed are now ultra cautious about making a change. Now workers complain about a lack of loyalty from their employers!

Is your organisation facing a similar situation? What is the solution? Let's have a chat and see if we can help you bridge this gap. 

Description:

In our recent discussions with clients and candidates, an interesting pattern is emerging which may have some very serious consequences for companies' talent acquisition plans and for the careers of senior management.

Following years of robust growth in emerging markets, the war for talent amongst businesses resulted in boom times for employees. Skilled workers were constantly being headhunted as companies tried desperately to maintain their talent pool as they scaled. This led to frequent job changes and rapid increases in remuneration as employees took advantage of the environment. One of the biggest complaints we heard was about the lack of loyalty amongst their workers.
 
As economies have started to recover, companies are once again looking to rebuild their talent pools. However, they are wary of employing individuals who were previously moving from one organisation to another. On the other hand, employees are wary of taking up assignments with organisations that until recently were still reducing headcount. Hence, despite the number of excellent candidates in the market, and a number of very interesting opportunities, many roles are still left unfilled as the mutual risk aversion leads to reluctance from both sides to close the deal.
 
Recently however, companies in emerging markets have been faced with a number of headwinds. Economic growth is falling in a number of countries due to both local and external factors such as elections, fiscal tightening by governments and weak macroeconomic conditions.

Faced with these challenges a number of companies have resorted to downsizing programmes in order to maintain competitiveness. Many employees have found themselves suddenly unemployed. In a few cases, redundancies have taken place in only a few months following the appointment of the employee in the organisation.

These abrupt changes have left many workers scarred and therefore far more risk averse. Those still in employment have also been affected as they hear the news of their friends losing their jobs. There are a number of very highly qualified and talented people who are suddenly looking for work. At the same time, those currently employed are now ultra cautious about making a change. Now workers complain about a lack of loyalty from their employers!

Is your organisation facing a similar situation? What is the solution? Let's have a chat and see if we can help you bridge this gap. 

Related Keyphrases:

talent amongst businesses | talent acquisition plans | frequent job changes | mutual risk aversion | excellent candidates | serious consequences | recent discussions | weak macroeconomic | similar situation | one organisation | loyalty amongst | Many employees | external factors | Economic growth | many workers

As recruiters enter 2019, the challenges in building and sustaining their talent pool continue to grow. All over the world, our clients are advising us of the increased difficulties in recruiting, retaining and engaging with top talent. Here are some of the key challenges they are facing:

Localisation – From the US to Tanzania, governments are making it increasingly difficult to hire expatriate workers. Companies are having to replace experienced workers with locals and competing for a smaller pool of talent. Increasingly companies are looking to increase their graduate hiring in order to start building a talent pool for the future. Attracting and integrating these high flyers into the organisation comes with its own set of challenges though, and this will be a key concern for HR professionals in 2019.

Diversity – companies are increasingly looking to bring in more diversity into their teams and trying to better manage this diversity within the organisation. With evidence showing that greater diversity leads to better organisational performance, companies are trying to attract candidates from more diverse backgrounds in order to encourage greater creativity and improve performance.

Millenials – as a rapidly growing proportion of the workforce, these digital natives are changing the way companies recruit, engage and retain their talent. A generation which is used to instant gratification through social media, has information at their fingertips and has a collectively different world view than baby boomers, needs a different style of management. Companies are having to adapt their entire human resource processes to enable more frequent interaction, improve their image and satisfy the ambitions of this new generation of workers.


Whilst the above challenges are real and significant, by taking a number of sensible actions, companies can positively build the workforce they need to succeed in this environment.

Description:

As recruiters enter 2019, the challenges in building and sustaining their talent pool continue to grow. All over the world, our clients are advising us of the increased difficulties in recruiting, retaining and engaging with top talent. Here are some of the key challenges they are facing:

Localisation – From the US to Tanzania, governments are making it increasingly difficult to hire expatriate workers. Companies are having to replace experienced workers with locals and competing for a smaller pool of talent. Increasingly companies are looking to increase their graduate hiring in order to start building a talent pool for the future. Attracting and integrating these high flyers into the organisation comes with its own set of challenges though, and this will be a key concern for HR professionals in 2019.

Diversity – companies are increasingly looking to bring in more diversity into their teams and trying to better manage this diversity within the organisation. With evidence showing that greater diversity leads to better organisational performance, companies are trying to attract candidates from more diverse backgrounds in order to encourage greater creativity and improve performance.

Millenials – as a rapidly growing proportion of the workforce, these digital natives are changing the way companies recruit, engage and retain their talent. A generation which is used to instant gratification through social media, has information at their fingertips and has a collectively different world view than baby boomers, needs a different style of management. Companies are having to adapt their entire human resource processes to enable more frequent interaction, improve their image and satisfy the ambitions of this new generation of workers.


Whilst the above challenges are real and significant, by taking a number of sensible actions, companies can positively build the workforce they need to succeed in this environment.

Related Keyphrases:

organisational performance | Increasingly companies | hire expatriate workers | increased difficulties | different world view | experienced workers | instant gratification | entire human resource | frequent interaction | diverse backgrounds | attract candidates | talent pool | way companies | key challenges | sensible actions

If you are looking for a job in Nigeria today, then things may be a little difficult at this time. Following the balance of payments crisis and dollar shortages caused by the collapse in oil prices in 2016, the economy went into a free fall with companies unable to secure foreign exchange to run their operations. For the following couple of years, most companies laid of workers and shrunk their operations in a bid to survive. Many foreign investors exited the country and those that continued focused on survival.

Following the recovery in oil prices and some improvement in the availability of foreign exchange following devaluation of the Naira, there was a short term spurt in hiring as companies who had made deep cuts in headcount suddenly found themselves short staffed as demand started improving.

How do things look today? On the surface, there should be a continued recovery in the job market as the economy continues to recover, driven by higher oil prices and a more stable macroeconomic environment.

However, with Christmas just around the corner, and the prospect of elections in February, with results to be announced in May, we feel that many employers will delay their hiring decisions except for the most urgent requirements.

For those in Nigeria right now, what do you think? Are my fears justified or is the situation better than we suspect?

To find out more about recruiting senior talent in Nigeria, get in touch today and discover our bespoke solutions for talent acquisition for your business.

Description:

If you are looking for a job in Nigeria today, then things may be a little difficult at this time. Following the balance of payments crisis and dollar shortages caused by the collapse in oil prices in 2016, the economy went into a free fall with companies unable to secure foreign exchange to run their operations. For the following couple of years, most companies laid of workers and shrunk their operations in a bid to survive. Many foreign investors exited the country and those that continued focused on survival.

Following the recovery in oil prices and some improvement in the availability of foreign exchange following devaluation of the Naira, there was a short term spurt in hiring as companies who had made deep cuts in headcount suddenly found themselves short staffed as demand started improving.

How do things look today? On the surface, there should be a continued recovery in the job market as the economy continues to recover, driven by higher oil prices and a more stable macroeconomic environment.

However, with Christmas just around the corner, and the prospect of elections in February, with results to be announced in May, we feel that many employers will delay their hiring decisions except for the most urgent requirements.

For those in Nigeria right now, what do you think? Are my fears justified or is the situation better than we suspect?

To find out more about recruiting senior talent in Nigeria, get in touch today and discover our bespoke solutions for talent acquisition for your business.

Related Keyphrases:

secure foreign exchange | recruiting senior talent | Many foreign investors | stable macroeconomic | talent acquisition | companies unable | bespoke solutions | Nigeria today | dollar shortages | payments crisis | short staffed | oil prices | many employers | touch today | availability

Asian markets are delivering growth three times that of the developed world and that is predicted to continue – and valuations are “reasonable and attractive relative to the rest of the world”.

The key drivers of economic growth in Asia: Increasing consumption driven by rising wealth and consumer spending; A wide range of world-class tech companies; Infrastructure growth driven largely by increasing urbanization; Increasing inter-regional trade, which has benefited from the reduction and removal of tariffs. Asia’s biggest trading partner is now itself. The middle class has grown substantially and is still growing – and this is where the action happens in terms of consumption

The Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) – dominated by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand – which has formed an effective 10-country trade bloc and is now the world’s sixth largest economy with 8 percent of the global population.

Last January, the World Bank released its Global Economic Prospects report indicating that the Philippines is the fastest-growing economy in ASEAN and is expected to sustain its robust economic growth for the next years. It also topped the US News’ list of best countries to invest in the world.

Vietnam has enjoyed strong economic growth. Since 1990, Vietnam’s GDP per capita growth has been among the fastest in the world, averaging 6.4 percent a year in the 2000s. Despite uncertainties in the global environment, Vietnam’s economy remains resilient. It has set its sights on becoming a developed nation by 2020.

Indonesia: The statistic shows the growth in real GDP in Indonesia from between 2012 to 2016, with projections up until 2022. In 2016, Indonesia’s real gross domestic product grew by around 5.02 percent compared to the previous year.



While Singapore and Malaysia are both mature markets which are extremely fast moving and competitive – Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Thailand, are relatively young, emerging markets, where there is great potential for growth. Relative to Singapore and Malaysia, these are large markets which are experiencing high growth with little competition.


Why is South East Asia a great place to work in?

Sitting in a meeting with people from various nationalities really changes your perspective of a business meeting. The dynamics at play working in a cultural melting pot, and the wide range of nationalities we meet on a daily basis really allow you to hone communication, influencing, and negotiation skills. Solving business problems with a plethora of cultures and backgrounds is truly rewarding.

Select Global Solutions is a Global Executive Search firm now expanding its geography to the developing countries of Southeast Asia; where we have closed senior finance, sales, IT and technical roles placing both local and expat talent.

We are currently hiring for executive jobs in across the region. To find out more, email us at info@selectglobal.co.in

Description:

Asian markets are delivering growth three times that of the developed world and that is predicted to continue – and valuations are “reasonable and attractive relative to the rest of the world”.

The key drivers of economic growth in Asia: Increasing consumption driven by rising wealth and consumer spending; A wide range of world-class tech companies; Infrastructure growth driven largely by increasing urbanization; Increasing inter-regional trade, which has benefited from the reduction and removal of tariffs. Asia’s biggest trading partner is now itself. The middle class has grown substantially and is still growing – and this is where the action happens in terms of consumption

The Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) – dominated by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand – which has formed an effective 10-country trade bloc and is now the world’s sixth largest economy with 8 percent of the global population.

Last January, the World Bank released its Global Economic Prospects report indicating that the Philippines is the fastest-growing economy in ASEAN and is expected to sustain its robust economic growth for the next years. It also topped the US News’ list of best countries to invest in the world.

Vietnam has enjoyed strong economic growth. Since 1990, Vietnam’s GDP per capita growth has been among the fastest in the world, averaging 6.4 percent a year in the 2000s. Despite uncertainties in the global environment, Vietnam’s economy remains resilient. It has set its sights on becoming a developed nation by 2020.

Indonesia: The statistic shows the growth in real GDP in Indonesia from between 2012 to 2016, with projections up until 2022. In 2016, Indonesia’s real gross domestic product grew by around 5.02 percent compared to the previous year.



While Singapore and Malaysia are both mature markets which are extremely fast moving and competitive – Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Thailand, are relatively young, emerging markets, where there is great potential for growth. Relative to Singapore and Malaysia, these are large markets which are experiencing high growth with little competition.


Why is South East Asia a great place to work in?

Sitting in a meeting with people from various nationalities really changes your perspective of a business meeting. The dynamics at play working in a cultural melting pot, and the wide range of nationalities we meet on a daily basis really allow you to hone communication, influencing, and negotiation skills. Solving business problems with a plethora of cultures and backgrounds is truly rewarding.

Select Global Solutions is a Global Executive Search firm now expanding its geography to the developing countries of Southeast Asia; where we have closed senior finance, sales, IT and technical roles placing both local and expat talent.

We are currently hiring for executive jobs in across the region. To find out more, email us at info@selectglobal.co.in

Related Keyphrases:

Global Economic Prospects report | s real gross domestic product | robust economic growth | strong economic growth | Global Executive Search firm | Infrastructure growth | South East Asian Nations | growth three times | Increasing consumption | various nationalities | capita growth | attractive relative | global environment | high growth | Global Solutions

Kenya’s national long-term development blueprint is aiming to transform Kenya into an industrializing, middle-income country providing a high quality of life to all its citizens by 2030. There are on-going construction and plans for public SEZs in Athi River, Naivasha, Nairobi, Mombasa, Kisumu and Lamu.


2018 is expected to produce numerous opportunities for job seekers and professionals. Finding a good opportunity is more competitive than ever. Trends like localization, employers being cost conscious, having specific job descriptions are changing the employment landscape, and impacting what skills and experience are most in demand.


Companies in Kenya are localizing. With the Paradigm shift in education levels, most of the multinationals and regional players want to hire more local talent to boost the economic level of the country. Going a step further, big multinationals are opening their doors to local talent from Kenya for their worldwide business.


We are hiring locals for Production, Finance & Accounts, Mechanical, and Marketing and Sales roles with a leading building material group, and also for plastics and chemical industries.   Interactions with local candidates is always a good experience as they are easily available, are very clear about their career goals, are easy to communicate with, time-bound and reply promptly to our queries. They are very humble, cooperative and of helping nature as they grow them as well others by giving reference of other suitable candidates.


There is good potential for recruitment in fields like Construction, Telecom, Insurance, Building Materials, and Hospitality etc. in the endeavour to redevelop the country in terms of economic strength and a better lifestyle.


We are currently working with Industries like Manufacturing (Steel. Building Materials, Plastics, Sugar etc.), Construction and Telecom. Recently we recruited, middle-level executives for production, Maintenance, IT, Marketing, Security, Accounts & Finance. Some C Level roles are also on the verge of finalization.


If you are hiring for your business in Kenya, get in touch to find out more about how we can help you with your recruitment needs to find local Kenyan talent.

Description:

Kenya’s national long-term development blueprint is aiming to transform Kenya into an industrializing, middle-income country providing a high quality of life to all its citizens by 2030. There are on-going construction and plans for public SEZs in Athi River, Naivasha, Nairobi, Mombasa, Kisumu and Lamu.


2018 is expected to produce numerous opportunities for job seekers and professionals. Finding a good opportunity is more competitive than ever. Trends like localization, employers being cost conscious, having specific job descriptions are changing the employment landscape, and impacting what skills and experience are most in demand.


Companies in Kenya are localizing. With the Paradigm shift in education levels, most of the multinationals and regional players want to hire more local talent to boost the economic level of the country. Going a step further, big multinationals are opening their doors to local talent from Kenya for their worldwide business.


We are hiring locals for Production, Finance & Accounts, Mechanical, and Marketing and Sales roles with a leading building material group, and also for plastics and chemical industries.   Interactions with local candidates is always a good experience as they are easily available, are very clear about their career goals, are easy to communicate with, time-bound and reply promptly to our queries. They are very humble, cooperative and of helping nature as they grow them as well others by giving reference of other suitable candidates.


There is good potential for recruitment in fields like Construction, Telecom, Insurance, Building Materials, and Hospitality etc. in the endeavour to redevelop the country in terms of economic strength and a better lifestyle.


We are currently working with Industries like Manufacturing (Steel. Building Materials, Plastics, Sugar etc.), Construction and Telecom. Recently we recruited, middle-level executives for production, Maintenance, IT, Marketing, Security, Accounts & Finance. Some C Level roles are also on the verge of finalization.


If you are hiring for your business in Kenya, get in touch to find out more about how we can help you with your recruitment needs to find local Kenyan talent.

Related Keyphrases:

find local Kenyan talent | specific job descriptions | numerous opportunities | development blueprint | local candidates | employment landscape | Building Materials | chemical industries | big multinationals | economic strength | good opportunity | transform Kenya | good experience | recruitment needs | local talent

2017 was the best year as far as the Africa tech revolution was concerned, as investment in tech start-ups topped US$195 million over the course of the year.

The number of tech starts ups that received funding has increase from 125 in 2015 to 146 in 2016 and 159 in 2017; this means Investor confidence and willingness to back African tech ventures is increasing.

The total funding raised by these companies – US$195,060,845 – also marks a 51% rise on the previous year’s figures, taking investment into African start-ups to an all-time record high. This proves that the speculation on African tech starts ups is real and not just hype and is impacting all aspects of daily life and service delivery.

Tech starts up are coming in all fields from healthcare to home cleaning; but it is the fintech companies that received the best funding as seen since last 3 years. A few other sectors also saw success in 2017. Ecommerce for example grew 350% on the previous year to collect over US$16 million in investment over the course of the year.

Agriculture and farming being big in Africa, there has been investment in agri-tech space, with growth of 203% in 2017. Agri-tech and e-health being are also interesting for investors due to the scope and need  of innovative new solutions, and the substantial impact element of ventures operating in these areas, these investments offer both sizeable returns and impact.

South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya continued to solidify their position as the top three investment destinations in Africa, but there was also interest in Egypt, Ghana, Uganda and Morocco.

Africa’s tech ecosystem is bound to create a trend which will continue to develop as the continent carries on presenting high quality innovations and businesses, tackling Africa’s challenges, but also scalable across the world.

Talent is a top priority for all start-up founders and executives. Starts up need to hire recruitment agencies with executive search teams who know the hiring needs of an entrepreneurial venture. Start-ups should recruit highly motivated, self-starting, hardworking candidates, quick thinking candidates with good execution skills who share a common vision and are interested in a job in a start-up.

Description:

2017 was the best year as far as the Africa tech revolution was concerned, as investment in tech start-ups topped US$195 million over the course of the year.

The number of tech starts ups that received funding has increase from 125 in 2015 to 146 in 2016 and 159 in 2017; this means Investor confidence and willingness to back African tech ventures is increasing.

The total funding raised by these companies – US$195,060,845 – also marks a 51% rise on the previous year’s figures, taking investment into African start-ups to an all-time record high. This proves that the speculation on African tech starts ups is real and not just hype and is impacting all aspects of daily life and service delivery.

Tech starts up are coming in all fields from healthcare to home cleaning; but it is the fintech companies that received the best funding as seen since last 3 years. A few other sectors also saw success in 2017. Ecommerce for example grew 350% on the previous year to collect over US$16 million in investment over the course of the year.

Agriculture and farming being big in Africa, there has been investment in agri-tech space, with growth of 203% in 2017. Agri-tech and e-health being are also interesting for investors due to the scope and need  of innovative new solutions, and the substantial impact element of ventures operating in these areas, these investments offer both sizeable returns and impact.

South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya continued to solidify their position as the top three investment destinations in Africa, but there was also interest in Egypt, Ghana, Uganda and Morocco.

Africa’s tech ecosystem is bound to create a trend which will continue to develop as the continent carries on presenting high quality innovations and businesses, tackling Africa’s challenges, but also scalable across the world.

Talent is a top priority for all start-up founders and executives. Starts up need to hire recruitment agencies with executive search teams who know the hiring needs of an entrepreneurial venture. Start-ups should recruit highly motivated, self-starting, hardworking candidates, quick thinking candidates with good execution skills who share a common vision and are interested in a job in a start-up.

Related Keyphrases:

top three investment destinations | Africa tech revolution | African tech ventures | substantial impact element | means Investor confidence | hire recruitment agencies | s tech ecosystem | high quality innovations | innovative new solutions | entrepreneurial venture | African tech | good execution skills | fintech companies | previous year | sizeable returns

(livemint)

It is too early to celebrate starts ups in India, considering they have a long way to go.

Not a particularly good year for Indian start-ups. After some good years of funding and generous valuations, the market is currently dull. Most start-ups fail ending with messy shutdowns and employees left with worthless stock options.

While the risks are high, the fascination with start-ups remains at an all-time high considering they are considered as trendy, cool, open hierarchy workplaces, mixing hard work with play.

The reality however is different for people directly involved in a start-up. There is independence and challenge that motivates and there is hope that the grime and sweat will pay off but the uncertainty can be taxing

So what is so attractive about a start-up?

It???s great to think about young college graduates suddently striking it big. While most Indians think of a good education and middle class life, starts up offer them an opportunity to think and achieve something bigger.

Start-ups are infectious with their dynamism and audacity and certain positivity in trying to change how business is done in India and moving the country forward. Compared to other businesses, the technology sector and start-ups in particular have a clean image.

They get immense exposure, support and publicity from the media focussing on their achievements, fund raising activities and have their fair share accelerators, incubators and mentors who make sure that the sector gets more than its due.

However, the number of starts up is still low, and success rates are comparatively quite low. Technology-enabled businesses are the future, but the Indian market is still nascent and in spite of deals and acquisitions, liquidity for founders and employees remains exceedingly rare.

Yet, India needs more start-ups; ambitious entrepreneurs who with their wilful ignorance and youthful confidence can bring in change.

As of today, it seems a bit premature to celebrate start-up successes before the sector has proven itself. Start-up founders and employees need to focus on building a product that adds value. Start-ups are associated with fast growth and obsessive thinking on how things can be done better in company building.

The biggest factor between start-ups that succeed and those that fail is persistence. There are rarely any overnight success stories. Most of them are working hard since years. Start-ups are not always about glamour and quick money.

Description:

(livemint)

It is too early to celebrate starts ups in India, considering they have a long way to go.

Not a particularly good year for Indian start-ups. After some good years of funding and generous valuations, the market is currently dull. Most start-ups fail ending with messy shutdowns and employees left with worthless stock options.

While the risks are high, the fascination with start-ups remains at an all-time high considering they are considered as trendy, cool, open hierarchy workplaces, mixing hard work with play.

The reality however is different for people directly involved in a start-up. There is independence and challenge that motivates and there is hope that the grime and sweat will pay off but the uncertainty can be taxing

So what is so attractive about a start-up?

It???s great to think about young college graduates suddently striking it big. While most Indians think of a good education and middle class life, starts up offer them an opportunity to think and achieve something bigger.

Start-ups are infectious with their dynamism and audacity and certain positivity in trying to change how business is done in India and moving the country forward. Compared to other businesses, the technology sector and start-ups in particular have a clean image.

They get immense exposure, support and publicity from the media focussing on their achievements, fund raising activities and have their fair share accelerators, incubators and mentors who make sure that the sector gets more than its due.

However, the number of starts up is still low, and success rates are comparatively quite low. Technology-enabled businesses are the future, but the Indian market is still nascent and in spite of deals and acquisitions, liquidity for founders and employees remains exceedingly rare.

Yet, India needs more start-ups; ambitious entrepreneurs who with their wilful ignorance and youthful confidence can bring in change.

As of today, it seems a bit premature to celebrate start-up successes before the sector has proven itself. Start-up founders and employees need to focus on building a product that adds value. Start-ups are associated with fast growth and obsessive thinking on how things can be done better in company building.

The biggest factor between start-ups that succeed and those that fail is persistence. There are rarely any overnight success stories. Most of them are working hard since years. Start-ups are not always about glamour and quick money.

Related Keyphrases:

celebrate starts ups | overnight success stories | open hierarchy workplaces | young college graduates | fair share accelerators | ambitious entrepreneurs | youthful confidence | generous valuations | obsessive thinking | certain positivity | middle class life | wilful ignorance | good education | immense exposure | Indian market

(livemint)

It is too early to celebrate starts ups in India, considering they have a long way to go.

Not a particularly good year for Indian start-ups. After some good years of funding and generous valuations, the market is currently dull. Most start-ups fail ending with messy shutdowns and employees left with worthless stock options.

While the risks are high, the fascination with start-ups remains at an all-time high considering they are considered as trendy, cool, open hierarchy workplaces, mixing hard work with play.

The reality however is different for people directly involved in a start-up. There is independence and challenge that motivates and there is hope that the grime and sweat will pay off but the uncertainty can be taxing.


So what is so attractive about a start-up?

It’s great to think about young college graduates suddently striking it big. While most Indians think of a good education and middle class life, starts up offer them an opportunity to think and achieve something bigger.

Start-ups are infectious with their dynamism and audacity and certain positivity in trying to change how business is done in India and moving the country forward. Compared to other businesses, the technology sector and start-ups in particular have a clean image.

They get immense exposure, support and publicity from the media focussing on their achievements, fund raising activities and have their fair share accelerators, incubators and mentors who make sure that the sector gets more than its due.

However, the number of starts up is still low, and success rates are comparatively quite low. Technology-enabled businesses are the future, but the Indian market is still nascent and in spite of deals and acquisitions, liquidity for founders and employees remains exceedingly rare.

Yet, India needs more start-ups; ambitious entrepreneurs who with their wilful ignorance and youthful confidence can bring in change.

As of today, it seems a bit premature to celebrate start-up successes before the sector has proven itself. Start-up founders and employees need to focus on building a product that adds value. Start-ups are associated with fast growth and obsessive thinking on how things can be done better in company building.

The biggest factor between start-ups that succeed and those that fail is persistence. There are rarely any overnight success stories. Most of them are working hard since years. Start-ups are not always about glamour and quick money.

Description:

(livemint)

It is too early to celebrate starts ups in India, considering they have a long way to go.

Not a particularly good year for Indian start-ups. After some good years of funding and generous valuations, the market is currently dull. Most start-ups fail ending with messy shutdowns and employees left with worthless stock options.

While the risks are high, the fascination with start-ups remains at an all-time high considering they are considered as trendy, cool, open hierarchy workplaces, mixing hard work with play.

The reality however is different for people directly involved in a start-up. There is independence and challenge that motivates and there is hope that the grime and sweat will pay off but the uncertainty can be taxing.


So what is so attractive about a start-up?

It’s great to think about young college graduates suddently striking it big. While most Indians think of a good education and middle class life, starts up offer them an opportunity to think and achieve something bigger.

Start-ups are infectious with their dynamism and audacity and certain positivity in trying to change how business is done in India and moving the country forward. Compared to other businesses, the technology sector and start-ups in particular have a clean image.

They get immense exposure, support and publicity from the media focussing on their achievements, fund raising activities and have their fair share accelerators, incubators and mentors who make sure that the sector gets more than its due.

However, the number of starts up is still low, and success rates are comparatively quite low. Technology-enabled businesses are the future, but the Indian market is still nascent and in spite of deals and acquisitions, liquidity for founders and employees remains exceedingly rare.

Yet, India needs more start-ups; ambitious entrepreneurs who with their wilful ignorance and youthful confidence can bring in change.

As of today, it seems a bit premature to celebrate start-up successes before the sector has proven itself. Start-up founders and employees need to focus on building a product that adds value. Start-ups are associated with fast growth and obsessive thinking on how things can be done better in company building.

The biggest factor between start-ups that succeed and those that fail is persistence. There are rarely any overnight success stories. Most of them are working hard since years. Start-ups are not always about glamour and quick money.

Related Keyphrases:

celebrate starts ups | overnight success stories | open hierarchy workplaces | young college graduates | fair share accelerators | ambitious entrepreneurs | youthful confidence | generous valuations | obsessive thinking | certain positivity | middle class life | wilful ignorance | good education | immense exposure | Indian market

Research proves that great work environments and happy employees are the best combination possible. All management efforts are fruitless when managing unhappy people. Hence, making sure employees feel valued, wanted and happy can improve overall productivity and save money.

Happy employees are less likely to leave you

While exploring the relationship between job satisfaction and employee turnover intention, it was found that companies with great culture will likely have a lower job turnover intention. 

Happy Employees means more productivity

People who were affected with something positive showed about higher productivity, while unhappy ones were less productive.

What are ways to a good work environment?

First you need good culture

To create a happier and healthier environment it???s important to first set up a good communication channel between managers and employees. Managers and leaders should create an open and selfless culture which will stand out from day one.

Happiness through the right perks

  • Frequent feedback and rewards.
  • It???s proven that frequent feedback and rewards have a greater influence on people than one big thing once a year.
  • Positive experiences with bigger impact.
  • Everything new and unexpected gets our attention and breaks the routine. Positive social activities can also override the occasional unavoidable bad news.
  • New experiences rather than objects.
  • Evidence indicates that providing new positive life experiences tends to provide a greater happiness boost than spending a comparable amount on material objects.
  • Surrounding environment can trigger happiness.
  • Adding little things at the office can boost the mood. Good music, delicious snacks or flowers can create a better feeling and improve performance.
  • Focusing on achievements and job appreciation. 
  • Spending more effort asking and listening to employee achievements, rather than a continuous focus on what???s broken or not done helps to keep the morale up.

It is true that for business success performance numbers are important and financial well-being vital. But by providing good working conditions, great team culture and something extra to make employees happy, you can boost company???s productivity and accelerate your business to rocket speed.

Happiness at work is a win-win. Happy, engaged people are healthier, more productive; they have more ideas, are more likely to contribute over and above the responsibilities of their job and help out colleagues, are less likely to leave or be off sick and are more likely to get to work on time.

What Creates a Team Environment?

Creating a team environment in a company does not come easy. To effectively build teams, it is important to remember that:

  • Teamwork is based on a company???s culture. Companies that encourage open, honest communication and foster employee interaction are in a better position to have good teamwork among employees.
  • Team spirit comes from the top. Building effective teams with the right attitude emanates from the highest levels of an organization. Only by flattening the traditional organizational pyramid can one expect to instill the right team culture.
  • People must fit the culture. Some people are team players and some aren???t. It???s partly a question of personality and partly a matter of training. One person in the team with the wrong attitude can undermine the effort of the entire team. Hiring only people with the right traits for teamwork is crucial in building effective teams.
  • The benefits of teamwork include increased efficiency, the ability to focus different minds on the same problem and mutual support. Efficiency: When a team is able to work well together they accomplish more than individuals can do alone. Cohesive, professional and friendly teams can create welcoming atmospheres that make customers feel at ease.

At Select Search Solutions, we have a great sense of togetherness and team spirit. Team members learn and build on each other???s skills to create more impressive results in the workplace, a great track record and several satisfied customers.

Looking for a challenging role or the right leadership talent to take your organisation to the next level? Get in touch with Vineet Joshi at vineet@selectglobal.co.in or visit our website http://www.selectsearchsolutions.com/

Description:

Research proves that great work environments and happy employees are the best combination possible. All management efforts are fruitless when managing unhappy people. Hence, making sure employees feel valued, wanted and happy can improve overall productivity and save money.

Happy employees are less likely to leave you

While exploring the relationship between job satisfaction and employee turnover intention, it was found that companies with great culture will likely have a lower job turnover intention. 

Happy Employees means more productivity

People who were affected with something positive showed about higher productivity, while unhappy ones were less productive.

What are ways to a good work environment?

First you need good culture

To create a happier and healthier environment it???s important to first set up a good communication channel between managers and employees. Managers and leaders should create an open and selfless culture which will stand out from day one.

Happiness through the right perks

  • Frequent feedback and rewards.
  • It???s proven that frequent feedback and rewards have a greater influence on people than one big thing once a year.
  • Positive experiences with bigger impact.
  • Everything new and unexpected gets our attention and breaks the routine. Positive social activities can also override the occasional unavoidable bad news.
  • New experiences rather than objects.
  • Evidence indicates that providing new positive life experiences tends to provide a greater happiness boost than spending a comparable amount on material objects.
  • Surrounding environment can trigger happiness.
  • Adding little things at the office can boost the mood. Good music, delicious snacks or flowers can create a better feeling and improve performance.
  • Focusing on achievements and job appreciation. 
  • Spending more effort asking and listening to employee achievements, rather than a continuous focus on what???s broken or not done helps to keep the morale up.

It is true that for business success performance numbers are important and financial well-being vital. But by providing good working conditions, great team culture and something extra to make employees happy, you can boost company???s productivity and accelerate your business to rocket speed.

Happiness at work is a win-win. Happy, engaged people are healthier, more productive; they have more ideas, are more likely to contribute over and above the responsibilities of their job and help out colleagues, are less likely to leave or be off sick and are more likely to get to work on time.

What Creates a Team Environment?

Creating a team environment in a company does not come easy. To effectively build teams, it is important to remember that:

  • Teamwork is based on a company???s culture. Companies that encourage open, honest communication and foster employee interaction are in a better position to have good teamwork among employees.
  • Team spirit comes from the top. Building effective teams with the right attitude emanates from the highest levels of an organization. Only by flattening the traditional organizational pyramid can one expect to instill the right team culture.
  • People must fit the culture. Some people are team players and some aren???t. It???s partly a question of personality and partly a matter of training. One person in the team with the wrong attitude can undermine the effort of the entire team. Hiring only people with the right traits for teamwork is crucial in building effective teams.
  • The benefits of teamwork include increased efficiency, the ability to focus different minds on the same problem and mutual support. Efficiency: When a team is able to work well together they accomplish more than individuals can do alone. Cohesive, professional and friendly teams can create welcoming atmospheres that make customers feel at ease.

At Select Search Solutions, we have a great sense of togetherness and team spirit. Team members learn and build on each other???s skills to create more impressive results in the workplace, a great track record and several satisfied customers.

Looking for a challenging role or the right leadership talent to take your organisation to the next level? Get in touch with Vineet Joshi at vineet@selectglobal.co.in or visit our website http://www.selectsearchsolutions.com/

Related Keyphrases:

business success performance numbers | great team culture | traditional organizational pyramid | new positive life experiences | great work environments | good work environment | employee turnover intention | improve overall productivity | good communication channel | foster employee interaction | Building effective teams | create welcoming atmospheres | Positive social activities | Surrounding environment | good working conditions

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit???or a mismatch???is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person ??? where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things ??? attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.

At Select Search Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option componenets are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Description:

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit???or a mismatch???is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person ??? where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things ??? attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.

At Select Search Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option componenets are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Related Keyphrases:

find high potential candidates | Traditional recruitment solutions | different compensation structures | Finding motivated people | several recruitment agencies | right soft skills | prospective candidates | important funding ecosystem | communication skills | proper recruiting process | Finding natural leaders | good candidates | right skills | consumer internet space | Select Search Solutions

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit—or a mismatch—is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person — where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things – attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.


At Select Global Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option components are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Description:

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit—or a mismatch—is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person — where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things – attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.


At Select Global Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option components are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Related Keyphrases:

find high potential candidates | right soft skills Almost | Finding motivated peopleMotivation | Traditional recruitment solutions | different compensation structures | candidatesSince work areas | several recruitment agencies | prospective candidates | important funding ecosystem | communication skills | proper recruiting process | FitA poor culture fit | right skills | consumer internet space | entrepreneurial vision

The Indian pharma industry is likely to be in the top 10 global markets in value terms by 2020.

The need of skilled manpower in the pharmaceutical industry ranges widely from Research and Development, Quality Assurance (QA), Intellectual Property (IP), manufacturing to even sales and marketing.

Select Search Solutions is a rapidly expanding, specialist consultancy working with pharma companies to attract the best talent in the market. We are pharma talent explorers, building great careers in the pharmacuetical industry. We work closely with our clients to help them find the skilled people they need to drive growth in their businesses.

We are helping shape the pharma industry by assisting both employers and professionals in the pharma sector to develop, grow and succeed by connecting the right people with the right opportunities. With a truly consultative approach and expert sector knowledge, we deliver the right result for clients and candidates alike.

Why us?

We come with several years of executive search experience, expert sector knowledge, a committed team, extensive networking and the best technology and tools in the recruitment industry.

Our Vision:

We aim to create long-term sustainable value for our clients. , ensuring effective roi. Our client wellbeing is central to our ethos. Our aim is to be the most respected specialist, pharma sector recruitment business.

We believe our clients deserve the best, hence we offer a choice based on their requirements and timelines. Clients can choose from our Basic Services and Premium Services.

Some of our Representative Searches:

At Plant Level

Plant Head, Production Manager, Maintenance Manager, Supply Chain / Logistics / Warehousing, QA / QC, R & D, Scientist

Corporate Level

Sales Manager (All Levels ??? Pan India), Accounts & Finance, Legal / Secretarial , Human Resource, Purchasing, Facility & Admin Management, Executive Assistant

Great vision without great people is irrelevant. Our talent is in finding yours. Connect with us to find your next great hire!

Description:

The Indian pharma industry is likely to be in the top 10 global markets in value terms by 2020.

The need of skilled manpower in the pharmaceutical industry ranges widely from Research and Development, Quality Assurance (QA), Intellectual Property (IP), manufacturing to even sales and marketing.

Select Search Solutions is a rapidly expanding, specialist consultancy working with pharma companies to attract the best talent in the market. We are pharma talent explorers, building great careers in the pharmacuetical industry. We work closely with our clients to help them find the skilled people they need to drive growth in their businesses.

We are helping shape the pharma industry by assisting both employers and professionals in the pharma sector to develop, grow and succeed by connecting the right people with the right opportunities. With a truly consultative approach and expert sector knowledge, we deliver the right result for clients and candidates alike.

Why us?

We come with several years of executive search experience, expert sector knowledge, a committed team, extensive networking and the best technology and tools in the recruitment industry.

Our Vision:

We aim to create long-term sustainable value for our clients. , ensuring effective roi. Our client wellbeing is central to our ethos. Our aim is to be the most respected specialist, pharma sector recruitment business.

We believe our clients deserve the best, hence we offer a choice based on their requirements and timelines. Clients can choose from our Basic Services and Premium Services.

Some of our Representative Searches:

At Plant Level

Plant Head, Production Manager, Maintenance Manager, Supply Chain / Logistics / Warehousing, QA / QC, R & D, Scientist

Corporate Level

Sales Manager (All Levels ??? Pan India), Accounts & Finance, Legal / Secretarial , Human Resource, Purchasing, Facility & Admin Management, Executive Assistant

Great vision without great people is irrelevant. Our talent is in finding yours. Connect with us to find your next great hire!

Related Keyphrases:

pharma sector recruitment | Indian pharma industry | pharma talent explorers | expert sector knowledge | executive search experience | pharmaceutical industry | pharmacuetical industry | Select Search Solutions | Representative Searches | specialist consultancy | right opportunities | Maintenance Manager | top 10 global markets | consultative approach | Intellectual Property

The Indian pharma industry is likely to be in the top 10 global markets in value terms by 2020.

The need of skilled manpower in the pharmaceutical industry ranges widely from Research and Development, Quality Assurance (QA), Intellectual Property (IP), manufacturing to even sales and marketing.

Select Search Solutions is a rapidly expanding, specialist consultancy working with pharma companies to attract the best talent in the market. We are pharma talent explorers, building great careers in the pharmacuetical industry. We work closely with our clients to help them find the skilled people they need to drive growth in their businesses.

We are helping shape the pharma industry by assisting both employers and professionals in the pharma sector to develop, grow and succeed by connecting the right people with the right opportunities. With a truly consultative approach and expert sector knowledge, we deliver the right result for clients and candidates alike.

Why us?

We come with several years of executive search experience, expert sector knowledge, a committed team, extensive networking and the best technology and tools in the recruitment industry.

Our Vision:

We aim to create long-term sustainable value for our clients. , ensuring effective roi. Our client wellbeing is central to our ethos. Our aim is to be the most respected specialist, pharma sector recruitment business.

We believe our clients deserve the best, hence we offer a choice based on their requirements and timelines. Clients can choose from our Basic Services and Premium Services.

Some of our Representative Searches:

At Plant Level

Plant Head, Production Manager, Maintenance Manager, Supply Chain / Logistics / Warehousing, QA / QC, R & D, Scientist

Corporate Level

Sales Manager (All Levels – Pan India), Accounts & Finance, Legal / Secretarial , Human Resource, Purchasing, Facility & Admin Management, Executive Assistant

Great vision without great people is irrelevant. Our talent is in finding yours. Connect with us to find your next great hire!

Description:

The Indian pharma industry is likely to be in the top 10 global markets in value terms by 2020.

The need of skilled manpower in the pharmaceutical industry ranges widely from Research and Development, Quality Assurance (QA), Intellectual Property (IP), manufacturing to even sales and marketing.

Select Search Solutions is a rapidly expanding, specialist consultancy working with pharma companies to attract the best talent in the market. We are pharma talent explorers, building great careers in the pharmacuetical industry. We work closely with our clients to help them find the skilled people they need to drive growth in their businesses.

We are helping shape the pharma industry by assisting both employers and professionals in the pharma sector to develop, grow and succeed by connecting the right people with the right opportunities. With a truly consultative approach and expert sector knowledge, we deliver the right result for clients and candidates alike.

Why us?

We come with several years of executive search experience, expert sector knowledge, a committed team, extensive networking and the best technology and tools in the recruitment industry.

Our Vision:

We aim to create long-term sustainable value for our clients. , ensuring effective roi. Our client wellbeing is central to our ethos. Our aim is to be the most respected specialist, pharma sector recruitment business.

We believe our clients deserve the best, hence we offer a choice based on their requirements and timelines. Clients can choose from our Basic Services and Premium Services.

Some of our Representative Searches:

At Plant Level

Plant Head, Production Manager, Maintenance Manager, Supply Chain / Logistics / Warehousing, QA / QC, R & D, Scientist

Corporate Level

Sales Manager (All Levels – Pan India), Accounts & Finance, Legal / Secretarial , Human Resource, Purchasing, Facility & Admin Management, Executive Assistant

Great vision without great people is irrelevant. Our talent is in finding yours. Connect with us to find your next great hire!

Related Keyphrases:

pharma sector recruitment | Indian pharma industry | pharma talent explorers | expert sector knowledge | executive search experience | pharmaceutical industry | pharmacuetical industry | Representative Searches | specialist consultancy | right opportunities | Maintenance Manager | top 10 global markets | consultative approach | Intellectual Property | extensive networking

The Indian creative sector is one of the fastest growing industries in the country. Exciting new developments in the technologies used in digital marketing, media and entertainment industry are taking place. Considering the rapid growth, and the ever changing environment, the media industry offers challenging, promising and exciting career options.

Search Gllbal Solutions is among leading recruitment agencies in India and across the world hiring for senior and mid management positions in the media sector. We understand that success in this industry depends on the right leadership with the vision, energy, risk taking capability and the foresight to lead a brand in the right direction.

We have a team of passionate professionals whose mission is to help you build a solid team of passionate people who will take your organisation to the next level.

In a fast paced and continuously changing industry dynamics, we are a team who assist you with talent search to help you stay way ahead of the competition and be better than the best.

We offer a complete range of services to help you find the right talent. Services we provide: Executive Search Services / Salary benchmarking / Psychometric Check / Reference check

Some of our Representative Searches:

  • Creative Director
  • Visualizer
  • Copy Writer
  • Graphic Designer
  • Key Account Manager
  • Social Media / Marketing Managers
  • Client Service Manager
  • Brand Manager
  • Business Development Manager and so on …

We Only Bring The Best. Discover for yourself what makes us specialists in recruitment for the creative sector.

Description:

The Indian creative sector is one of the fastest growing industries in the country. Exciting new developments in the technologies used in digital marketing, media and entertainment industry are taking place. Considering the rapid growth, and the ever changing environment, the media industry offers challenging, promising and exciting career options.

Search Gllbal Solutions is among leading recruitment agencies in India and across the world hiring for senior and mid management positions in the media sector. We understand that success in this industry depends on the right leadership with the vision, energy, risk taking capability and the foresight to lead a brand in the right direction.

We have a team of passionate professionals whose mission is to help you build a solid team of passionate people who will take your organisation to the next level.

In a fast paced and continuously changing industry dynamics, we are a team who assist you with talent search to help you stay way ahead of the competition and be better than the best.

We offer a complete range of services to help you find the right talent. Services we provide: Executive Search Services / Salary benchmarking / Psychometric Check / Reference check

Some of our Representative Searches:

  • Creative Director
  • Visualizer
  • Copy Writer
  • Graphic Designer
  • Key Account Manager
  • Social Media / Marketing Managers
  • Client Service Manager
  • Brand Manager
  • Business Development Manager and so on …

We Only Bring The Best. Discover for yourself what makes us specialists in recruitment for the creative sector.

Related Keyphrases:

Creative DirectorVisualizerCopy WriterGraphic DesignerKey Account ManagerSocial Media | Marketing ManagersClient Service ManagerBrand ManagerBusiness Development Manager | Executive Search Services | Indian creative sector | Exciting new developments | entertainment industry | passionate professionals | mid management positions | Representative Searches | recruitment agencies | industry dynamics | media industry | right leadership | passionate people | Psychometric Check

In India, like every year, millions of graduates will join the workforce. Also many new hiring of experienced professionals are likely to happen.

Wiring a good and effective resume is the best stop towards your dream job. Considering an employer or an HR Manager has six seconds to scan your resume, you need to get it right the first time.

Some amazing tips to write a top notch and hard to miss resume:

  1. Know the purpose of your resume
  2. Write the resume with the purpose of landing an interview. A really long and boring resume making you appear desperate for work may not get you that interview at all.
  3. Back up your qualities and strengths
  4. Writing a crisp, concise resume with all your qualities and connecting them to real life situations is a good idea to convince the employer of your skills without sounding exaggerated.
  5. Make sure to use the right keywords
  6. Considering most companies search online for talent using specific keywords, using the right and effective keywords related to job description and titles are essential for HR people to found your resume online.
  7. Use effective titles
  8. Resume with effective titles are noticed by HR heads. An effective title highlights the qualifications of the candidate with specific industry expertise, is short and to the point, underlining the relevant experience.
  9. Proofread the resume
  10. Many people find it difficult to spot spelling mistakes on their resume when reading text on a computer screen, so it???s a good idea to proofread your resume after printing it out on paper. A resume with typos and errors is a definite turn off and shows lack of attention to detail.
  11. Use bullet points
  12. Bullet points allow you to highlight your most relevant accomplishments and to describe your, work history, experiences, educational background and professional objectives. Potential employers can quickly scan your resume to determine if you are a good fit for the job.
  13. Attention to the typography
  14. Using good, readable fonts indicate personality, style and professionalism ??? all of which can impact a hiring manager's impression of you before they've even met you in person.
  15. Explain the benefits of your skills
  16. Letting the potential employer know your skill sets is not enough. Indicating how you skills set can benefit them and connect it to tangible results; then you will greatly improve your chances.
  17. Support responsibilities with Achievements
  18. Informing the employer about your responsibilities and professional achievements with supporting numbers are efficient self-marketing tolls.
  19. Tailor resume for the employer
  20. Using the same standard resume and cover letter for all posts and companies is a complete no brainer. Resumes and cover letters should be modified to present your candidature for specific positions and companies.
  21. Use Mr. and Ms. if appropriate
  22. If you have a gender neutral name like Alex or Ryan make sure to include the Mr. or Ms. prefix, so that employers will not get confused about your gender.
  23. Resume length
  24. A resume should be one or two pages long. A crisp, focused resume focused on your key selling points demonstrates an ability to synthesize, prioritize, and convey the most important information about you"
  25. Update your resume regularly
  26. An up to date resume with relevant information about latest accomplishments, courses, training programs and other academic qualifications received is makes a good impression on the employer about your being in tune with the latest in your industry.
  27. No fancy design and details
  28. A professional looking resume is the one that concentrates on your accomplishments and your successes and never loses vision of the information. Any over the top colour, icons, fancy fonts, background designs or info graphics will put off the employer unless you are applying for the position of a graphic designer.
  29. Don???t forget the basics
  30. The first thing on your resume should be your name. It should be bold and with a larger font than the rest of the text. Make sure that your contact details are clearly listed. Secondly, both the name and contact details should be included on all the pages of the resume (if you have more than one).


Description:

In India, like every year, millions of graduates will join the workforce. Also many new hiring of experienced professionals are likely to happen.

Wiring a good and effective resume is the best stop towards your dream job. Considering an employer or an HR Manager has six seconds to scan your resume, you need to get it right the first time.

Some amazing tips to write a top notch and hard to miss resume:

  1. Know the purpose of your resume
  2. Write the resume with the purpose of landing an interview. A really long and boring resume making you appear desperate for work may not get you that interview at all.
  3. Back up your qualities and strengths
  4. Writing a crisp, concise resume with all your qualities and connecting them to real life situations is a good idea to convince the employer of your skills without sounding exaggerated.
  5. Make sure to use the right keywords
  6. Considering most companies search online for talent using specific keywords, using the right and effective keywords related to job description and titles are essential for HR people to found your resume online.
  7. Use effective titles
  8. Resume with effective titles are noticed by HR heads. An effective title highlights the qualifications of the candidate with specific industry expertise, is short and to the point, underlining the relevant experience.
  9. Proofread the resume
  10. Many people find it difficult to spot spelling mistakes on their resume when reading text on a computer screen, so it???s a good idea to proofread your resume after printing it out on paper. A resume with typos and errors is a definite turn off and shows lack of attention to detail.
  11. Use bullet points
  12. Bullet points allow you to highlight your most relevant accomplishments and to describe your, work history, experiences, educational background and professional objectives. Potential employers can quickly scan your resume to determine if you are a good fit for the job.
  13. Attention to the typography
  14. Using good, readable fonts indicate personality, style and professionalism ??? all of which can impact a hiring manager's impression of you before they've even met you in person.
  15. Explain the benefits of your skills
  16. Letting the potential employer know your skill sets is not enough. Indicating how you skills set can benefit them and connect it to tangible results; then you will greatly improve your chances.
  17. Support responsibilities with Achievements
  18. Informing the employer about your responsibilities and professional achievements with supporting numbers are efficient self-marketing tolls.
  19. Tailor resume for the employer
  20. Using the same standard resume and cover letter for all posts and companies is a complete no brainer. Resumes and cover letters should be modified to present your candidature for specific positions and companies.
  21. Use Mr. and Ms. if appropriate
  22. If you have a gender neutral name like Alex or Ryan make sure to include the Mr. or Ms. prefix, so that employers will not get confused about your gender.
  23. Resume length
  24. A resume should be one or two pages long. A crisp, focused resume focused on your key selling points demonstrates an ability to synthesize, prioritize, and convey the most important information about you"
  25. Update your resume regularly
  26. An up to date resume with relevant information about latest accomplishments, courses, training programs and other academic qualifications received is makes a good impression on the employer about your being in tune with the latest in your industry.
  27. No fancy design and details
  28. A professional looking resume is the one that concentrates on your accomplishments and your successes and never loses vision of the information. Any over the top colour, icons, fancy fonts, background designs or info graphics will put off the employer unless you are applying for the position of a graphic designer.
  29. Don???t forget the basics
  30. The first thing on your resume should be your name. It should be bold and with a larger font than the rest of the text. Make sure that your contact details are clearly listed. Secondly, both the name and contact details should be included on all the pages of the resume (if you have more than one).


Related Keyphrases:

focused resume focused | effective resume | effective title highlights | standard resume | specific industry expertise | concise resume | relevant accomplishments | Tailor resume | boring resume | professional achievements | Use effective titles | miss resume | date resume | Support responsibilities | professional objectives

In India, like every year, millions of graduates will join the workforce. Also many new hiring of experienced professionals are likely to happen.

Wiring a good and effective resume is the best stop towards your dream job. Considering an employer or an HR Manager has six seconds to scan your resume, you need to get it right the first time.

 

Some amazing tips to write a top notch and hard to miss resume:

  1. Know the purpose of your resume
  2. Write the resume with the purpose of landing an interview. A really long and boring resume making you appear desperate for work may not get you that interview at all.
  3. Back up your qualities and strengths
  4. Writing a crisp, concise resume with all your qualities and connecting them to real life situations is a good idea to convince the employer of your skills without sounding exaggerated.
  5. Make sure to use the right keywords
  6. Considering most companies search online for talent using specific keywords, using the right and effective keywords related to job description and titles are essential for HR people to found your resume online.
  7. Use effective titles
  8. Resume with effective titles are noticed by HR heads. An effective title highlights the qualifications of the candidate with specific industry expertise, is short and to the point, underlining the relevant experience.
  9. Proofread the resume
  10. Many people find it difficult to spot spelling mistakes on their resume when reading text on a computer screen, so it’s a good idea to proofread your resume after printing it out on paper. A resume with typos and errors is a definite turn off and shows lack of attention to detail.
  11. Use bullet points
  12. Bullet points allow you to highlight your most relevant accomplishments and to describe your, work history, experiences, educational background and professional objectives. Potential employers can quickly scan your resume to determine if you are a good fit for the job.
  13. Attention to the typography
  14. Using good, readable fonts indicate personality, style and professionalism – all of which can impact a hiring manager's impression of you before they've even met you in person.
  15. Explain the benefits of your skills
  16. Letting the potential employer know your skill sets is not enough. Indicating how you skills set can benefit them and connect it to tangible results; then you will greatly improve your chances.
  17. Support responsibilities with Achievements
  18. Informing the employer about your responsibilities and professional achievements with supporting numbers are efficient self-marketing tolls.
  19. Tailor resume for the employer
  20. Using the same standard resume and cover letter for all posts and companies is a complete no brainer. Resumes and cover letters should be modified to present your candidature for specific positions and companies.
  21. Use Mr. and Ms. if appropriate
  22. If you have a gender neutral name like Alex or Ryan make sure to include the Mr. or Ms. prefix, so that employers will not get confused about your gender.
  23. Resume length
  24. A resume should be one or two pages long. A crisp, focused resume focused on your key selling points demonstrates an ability to synthesize, prioritize, and convey the most important information about you"
  25. Update your resume regularly
  26. An up to date resume with relevant information about latest accomplishments, courses, training programs and other academic qualifications received is makes a good impression on the employer about your being in tune with the latest in your industry.
  27. No fancy design and details
  28. A professional looking resume is the one that concentrates on your accomplishments and your successes and never loses vision of the information. Any over the top colour, icons, fancy fonts, background designs or info graphics will put off the employer unless you are applying for the position of a graphic designer.
  29. Don’t forget the basics
  30. The first thing on your resume should be your name. It should be bold and with a larger font than the rest of the text. Make sure that your contact details are clearly listed. Secondly, both the name and contact details should be included on all the pages of the resume (if you have more than one).

Description:

In India, like every year, millions of graduates will join the workforce. Also many new hiring of experienced professionals are likely to happen.

Wiring a good and effective resume is the best stop towards your dream job. Considering an employer or an HR Manager has six seconds to scan your resume, you need to get it right the first time.

 

Some amazing tips to write a top notch and hard to miss resume:

  1. Know the purpose of your resume
  2. Write the resume with the purpose of landing an interview. A really long and boring resume making you appear desperate for work may not get you that interview at all.
  3. Back up your qualities and strengths
  4. Writing a crisp, concise resume with all your qualities and connecting them to real life situations is a good idea to convince the employer of your skills without sounding exaggerated.
  5. Make sure to use the right keywords
  6. Considering most companies search online for talent using specific keywords, using the right and effective keywords related to job description and titles are essential for HR people to found your resume online.
  7. Use effective titles
  8. Resume with effective titles are noticed by HR heads. An effective title highlights the qualifications of the candidate with specific industry expertise, is short and to the point, underlining the relevant experience.
  9. Proofread the resume
  10. Many people find it difficult to spot spelling mistakes on their resume when reading text on a computer screen, so it’s a good idea to proofread your resume after printing it out on paper. A resume with typos and errors is a definite turn off and shows lack of attention to detail.
  11. Use bullet points
  12. Bullet points allow you to highlight your most relevant accomplishments and to describe your, work history, experiences, educational background and professional objectives. Potential employers can quickly scan your resume to determine if you are a good fit for the job.
  13. Attention to the typography
  14. Using good, readable fonts indicate personality, style and professionalism – all of which can impact a hiring manager's impression of you before they've even met you in person.
  15. Explain the benefits of your skills
  16. Letting the potential employer know your skill sets is not enough. Indicating how you skills set can benefit them and connect it to tangible results; then you will greatly improve your chances.
  17. Support responsibilities with Achievements
  18. Informing the employer about your responsibilities and professional achievements with supporting numbers are efficient self-marketing tolls.
  19. Tailor resume for the employer
  20. Using the same standard resume and cover letter for all posts and companies is a complete no brainer. Resumes and cover letters should be modified to present your candidature for specific positions and companies.
  21. Use Mr. and Ms. if appropriate
  22. If you have a gender neutral name like Alex or Ryan make sure to include the Mr. or Ms. prefix, so that employers will not get confused about your gender.
  23. Resume length
  24. A resume should be one or two pages long. A crisp, focused resume focused on your key selling points demonstrates an ability to synthesize, prioritize, and convey the most important information about you"
  25. Update your resume regularly
  26. An up to date resume with relevant information about latest accomplishments, courses, training programs and other academic qualifications received is makes a good impression on the employer about your being in tune with the latest in your industry.
  27. No fancy design and details
  28. A professional looking resume is the one that concentrates on your accomplishments and your successes and never loses vision of the information. Any over the top colour, icons, fancy fonts, background designs or info graphics will put off the employer unless you are applying for the position of a graphic designer.
  29. Don’t forget the basics
  30. The first thing on your resume should be your name. It should be bold and with a larger font than the rest of the text. Make sure that your contact details are clearly listed. Secondly, both the name and contact details should be included on all the pages of the resume (if you have more than one).

Related Keyphrases:

focused resume focused | effective resume | effective title highlights | resume regularlyAn | specific industry expertise | relevant accomplishments | right keywordsConsidering | professional achievements | standard resume | bullet pointsBullet points | concise resume | effective titlesResume | boring resume | professional objectives | experienced professionals