Related to "stable macroeconomic"

The Covid-19 pandemic has created a huge amount of disruption to careers as employers and employees grapple with the financial and health impacts of the pandemic on their lives. 

Employees have found themselves faced with both crisis and opportunity as companies rapidly resize to adapt to the new normal. In addition to career considerations, they are also re-evaluating the risks associated with where they work and re-assessing their priorities to determine what they want to do with their lives. 

Expatriates, often miles from home, found themselves in a particularly difficult situation when it became clear that the virus was going to bring unprecedented disruption to life. Being separated from their families and suddenly unable to travel home led many to despair as they found themselves stuck and often facing a tough financial situation.

Having spoken to many individuals who are facing these challenges, we look at the key considerations to take into account when making decisions during this period of disruption.

Our advice is to keep calm and take time to come to prepare yourself before coming to a decision. This is important for every decision in the process of looking for a new role.

1. Should you look for a new opportunity during this time? Many companies have instituted salary cuts for their middle and senior management and many candidates are looking to move as a result. In some extreme cases, they have been laid off.

2. In the case of pay cuts, it is important to consider what the long term prospects are for the company. If the organization is inherently stable then it may be better to ride out the storm rather than jump ship. Whilst there may be higher paid job offers available, do these companies provide the same stability in the long run? We will be publishing an updated salary survey soon.

3. If you have been unlucky and have lost your job, it is important to take time to prepare your CV and research the companies you want to work for or apply to. A shotgun approach to a job search is rarely successful. We come across many poorly written or prepared CVs which automatically puts the candidate at a disadvantage.

4. Finally, those candidates who do manage to land a new role may be at a disadvantage when it comes to negotiating for their salary and benefits because of the current labor market and economy. Again, it is important to take some time to determine whether to push for a higher package or accept what is on offer.

In the near term, negotiating could be harder for applicants as companies are working through understanding all the impacts of COVID-19 on their business. It is worth taking some time to see if milestone based increments are possible, or to try and negotiate some performance based incentives. 

In conclusion, it is important to think carefully about each step of the process and invest sufficient time to ensure that you can achieve the best outcome for your career in the long term.


For the latest jobs in Africa, do check our job openings page https://www.selectglobal.co.in/jobs4552.html?v=63. You can apply for jobs across Africa in various industries and sectors, from jobs in operations, jobs in marketing to jobs in sales and finance. Our team follows a rigorous search and selection process to ensure both candidates and clients find the best fit for their next career move.

Description:

The Covid-19 pandemic has created a huge amount of disruption to careers as employers and employees grapple with the financial and health impacts of the pandemic on their lives. 

Employees have found themselves faced with both crisis and opportunity as companies rapidly resize to adapt to the new normal. In addition to career considerations, they are also re-evaluating the risks associated with where they work and re-assessing their priorities to determine what they want to do with their lives. 

Expatriates, often miles from home, found themselves in a particularly difficult situation when it became clear that the virus was going to bring unprecedented disruption to life. Being separated from their families and suddenly unable to travel home led many to despair as they found themselves stuck and often facing a tough financial situation.

Having spoken to many individuals who are facing these challenges, we look at the key considerations to take into account when making decisions during this period of disruption.

Our advice is to keep calm and take time to come to prepare yourself before coming to a decision. This is important for every decision in the process of looking for a new role.

1. Should you look for a new opportunity during this time? Many companies have instituted salary cuts for their middle and senior management and many candidates are looking to move as a result. In some extreme cases, they have been laid off.

2. In the case of pay cuts, it is important to consider what the long term prospects are for the company. If the organization is inherently stable then it may be better to ride out the storm rather than jump ship. Whilst there may be higher paid job offers available, do these companies provide the same stability in the long run? We will be publishing an updated salary survey soon.

3. If you have been unlucky and have lost your job, it is important to take time to prepare your CV and research the companies you want to work for or apply to. A shotgun approach to a job search is rarely successful. We come across many poorly written or prepared CVs which automatically puts the candidate at a disadvantage.

4. Finally, those candidates who do manage to land a new role may be at a disadvantage when it comes to negotiating for their salary and benefits because of the current labor market and economy. Again, it is important to take some time to determine whether to push for a higher package or accept what is on offer.

In the near term, negotiating could be harder for applicants as companies are working through understanding all the impacts of COVID-19 on their business. It is worth taking some time to see if milestone based increments are possible, or to try and negotiate some performance based incentives. 

In conclusion, it is important to think carefully about each step of the process and invest sufficient time to ensure that you can achieve the best outcome for your career in the long term.


For the latest jobs in Africa, do check our job openings page https://www.selectglobal.co.in/jobs4552.html?v=63. You can apply for jobs across Africa in various industries and sectors, from jobs in operations, jobs in marketing to jobs in sales and finance. Our team follows a rigorous search and selection process to ensure both candidates and clients find the best fit for their next career move.

Related Keyphrases:

bring unprecedented disruption | career considerations | updated salary survey | job offers available | long term prospects | many candidates | difficult situation | job openings page | current labor market | sufficient time | many individuals | key considerations | new opportunity | selection process | Many companies

Following the turmoil this year, we have been speaking to our clients and candidates across the world to try and make sense of what is happening and what may come next for hiring and managing talent.

Some common themes that have already been reported:

  1. Work From Home (WFH) is here to stay, though perhaps not at 100%
  2. Most companies have imposed hiring freezes and/or are going through painful downsizing or paycuts
  3. There are multiple applicants for most jobs and many of the candidates are vastly overqualified for these roles
  4. Graduates are in a really tough bind at the moment

And so on….

We also found some other trends that are less obvious and sometimes counterintuitive. Here we share some of the more surprising trends that we have been encountering;

Talent - It is getting harder to hire (yes, really!)
Given the earlier comments about multiple applicants for any job being posted, this statement seems a little daft. In reality, what we saw is that many good candidates are not willing to switch jobs at this time. Even those who had been forced to take a pay cut, were willing to stick it out with their current organisation.

Very few employees working with larger organisations and respected brands were willing to consider a change, despite being offered higher salaries. Those who had recently been let go were still wary of taking on a job with lesser known companies and preferred organisations perceived to be more stable.

Trepidation - Employees are worried about WFH
Many articles have predicted how organisations will be forced to allow employees much greater flexibility and freedom in working from home. In reality, many employees want to get back to the office. Apart from the obvious reasons (children, internet, air-conditioning, social interaction etc.) they are also concerned about the impact of WFH on their career prospects. Recent graduates worry about the lack of mentoring and visibility, more senior employees worry about how the next promotion will come through. Worries about job security and lack of contact with superiors were fuelling their desire to get back to the office.

Technology - Driving a new wave of hiring and firing
Despite the headlines around job losses across sectors and organisations, there is an increase in opportunities for positions that have been newly created by the adoption of new technologies. For instance, a UK bank was forced to re-engineer a number of their backend processes when lockdowns were imposed leaving their Indian back office redundant. There are likely to be significant job losses in India, however they are now looking to add to their technology teams globally to support the new tech enabled processes which they have deployed.

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.

We would be happy to brainstorm with you and see if there is a way in which we can assist.

Description:

Following the turmoil this year, we have been speaking to our clients and candidates across the world to try and make sense of what is happening and what may come next for hiring and managing talent.

Some common themes that have already been reported:

  1. Work From Home (WFH) is here to stay, though perhaps not at 100%
  2. Most companies have imposed hiring freezes and/or are going through painful downsizing or paycuts
  3. There are multiple applicants for most jobs and many of the candidates are vastly overqualified for these roles
  4. Graduates are in a really tough bind at the moment

And so on….

We also found some other trends that are less obvious and sometimes counterintuitive. Here we share some of the more surprising trends that we have been encountering;

Talent - It is getting harder to hire (yes, really!)
Given the earlier comments about multiple applicants for any job being posted, this statement seems a little daft. In reality, what we saw is that many good candidates are not willing to switch jobs at this time. Even those who had been forced to take a pay cut, were willing to stick it out with their current organisation.

Very few employees working with larger organisations and respected brands were willing to consider a change, despite being offered higher salaries. Those who had recently been let go were still wary of taking on a job with lesser known companies and preferred organisations perceived to be more stable.

Trepidation - Employees are worried about WFH
Many articles have predicted how organisations will be forced to allow employees much greater flexibility and freedom in working from home. In reality, many employees want to get back to the office. Apart from the obvious reasons (children, internet, air-conditioning, social interaction etc.) they are also concerned about the impact of WFH on their career prospects. Recent graduates worry about the lack of mentoring and visibility, more senior employees worry about how the next promotion will come through. Worries about job security and lack of contact with superiors were fuelling their desire to get back to the office.

Technology - Driving a new wave of hiring and firing
Despite the headlines around job losses across sectors and organisations, there is an increase in opportunities for positions that have been newly created by the adoption of new technologies. For instance, a UK bank was forced to re-engineer a number of their backend processes when lockdowns were imposed leaving their Indian back office redundant. There are likely to be significant job losses in India, however they are now looking to add to their technology teams globally to support the new tech enabled processes which they have deployed.

If you’re struggling with some of these issues and would like to think through some possible solutions, please get in touch. Our team is working remotely with business as usual, and have taken this time to improve and increase our service offerings in talent management solutions.

We would be happy to brainstorm with you and see if there is a way in which we can assist.

Related Keyphrases:

significant job losses | many good candidates | social interaction etc | multiple applicants | senior employees | possible solutions | many employees | talent management | new technologies | office redundant | surprising trends | service offerings | counterintuitive | obvious reasons | technology teams

Capital City

Port Moresby

Currency

Papua New Guinean kina

President

James Marape

Official language

English, Hiri Motu, PNG Sign Language, Tok Pisin

Government

Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy

Population

8,606,323

Time Difference to India

4:30 Hours ahead of India








Capital City- Port Moresby: Wewak, Varimo, Madang, Wabag, Lae, Mt. Hagen, Popondetta, Kundiawa, Port Moresby, Mendi, Kerema and Daru are the major cities of Papua New Guinea. Port Moresby, also known as Pom City or simply Moresby, is the capital and largest city of Papua New Guinea and the largest city in the South Pacific outside of Australia and New Zealand. The expatriate community in Port Moresby is welcoming and sympathetic to newcomers. There are cycling and triathlon groups, scuba diving and fishing clubs, organized hill-walking groups, art classes and a book clubs. Starting one yourself in Port Moresby is easy since both the city and its diverse residents are especially open to people with energy and ideas for start-ups. 

Cultural and Social Environment: The local population in the coastal regions are well cultured.. There are organized amateur leagues for the most popular sports, which include rugby, cricket, football (soccer), softball, basketball, and volleyball. There are many expensive restaurants and night spots in Port Moresby and other big cities, and the highways are jammed with imported cars. The tourist areas like Loloata Island and some untouched beaches are everywhere.

Educational Facilities: Few international standard schools are available, and depend upon different provinces. All major towns have some facilities, depending on the international community population in the town. Fees varies to different levels from USD 3000/ Year to USD 20,000 / Year

Medical Facilities: There are government hospitals with good facilities in addition to a few private hospital run by Indians and Philippines, like Paradise International Hospital in POM and Lae International Hospital in Lae etc.

Major Industries: The key industries in the country are Mining, Agriculture, Timber & plantations (Cocoa, Coffee, Copper etc.). The major industries are food industries, like Ramu Sugar/Nickel, GFI, Lae Biscuit, Paradise Food, Coca cola, Mainland Holdings to name a few. Most consumable business es are dependent on imports. 

Job opportunities: For expats, most opportunities are in finance, sales, admin and technical roles.

Political Environment This is a big challenge as the current government is not stable or development oriented.  Corruption levels are high, making it a challenging business environment.

Description:

Capital City

Port Moresby

Currency

Papua New Guinean kina

President

James Marape

Official language

English, Hiri Motu, PNG Sign Language, Tok Pisin

Government

Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy

Population

8,606,323

Time Difference to India

4:30 Hours ahead of India








Capital City- Port Moresby: Wewak, Varimo, Madang, Wabag, Lae, Mt. Hagen, Popondetta, Kundiawa, Port Moresby, Mendi, Kerema and Daru are the major cities of Papua New Guinea. Port Moresby, also known as Pom City or simply Moresby, is the capital and largest city of Papua New Guinea and the largest city in the South Pacific outside of Australia and New Zealand. The expatriate community in Port Moresby is welcoming and sympathetic to newcomers. There are cycling and triathlon groups, scuba diving and fishing clubs, organized hill-walking groups, art classes and a book clubs. Starting one yourself in Port Moresby is easy since both the city and its diverse residents are especially open to people with energy and ideas for start-ups. 

Cultural and Social Environment: The local population in the coastal regions are well cultured.. There are organized amateur leagues for the most popular sports, which include rugby, cricket, football (soccer), softball, basketball, and volleyball. There are many expensive restaurants and night spots in Port Moresby and other big cities, and the highways are jammed with imported cars. The tourist areas like Loloata Island and some untouched beaches are everywhere.

Educational Facilities: Few international standard schools are available, and depend upon different provinces. All major towns have some facilities, depending on the international community population in the town. Fees varies to different levels from USD 3000/ Year to USD 20,000 / Year

Medical Facilities: There are government hospitals with good facilities in addition to a few private hospital run by Indians and Philippines, like Paradise International Hospital in POM and Lae International Hospital in Lae etc.

Major Industries: The key industries in the country are Mining, Agriculture, Timber & plantations (Cocoa, Coffee, Copper etc.). The major industries are food industries, like Ramu Sugar/Nickel, GFI, Lae Biscuit, Paradise Food, Coca cola, Mainland Holdings to name a few. Most consumable business es are dependent on imports. 

Job opportunities: For expats, most opportunities are in finance, sales, admin and technical roles.

Political Environment This is a big challenge as the current government is not stable or development oriented.  Corruption levels are high, making it a challenging business environment.

Related Keyphrases:

international community population | Paradise International Hospital | Lae International Hospital | international standard schools | parliamentary constitutional | many expensive restaurants | Port Moresby | consumable business es | Papua New Guinea | business environment | expatriate community | government hospitals | different provinces | major industries | private hospital run

Capital City

Maputo

Country Code

+258

Currency

Mozambican Metical (MZN)

(1 INR = 0.882413 MZN)

(1 USD = 66.5033 MZN)

President

Filipe Nyusi

Official language

Portuguese

Government

Presidential System

Population

31.26 million (2020)

Time Difference to India

Mozambique is 3.30 hours behind India









Mozambique is located on South-east of Africa and is bordered by Tanzania, South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi.

Capital City- Maputo: It is the largest city in Mozambique. It has major production of agricultural products like cotton, cashew nuts, sugarcane, tea, corn, coconuts, tropical fruits, potatoes and manufacturing of Industrial products like aluminium products, petroleum products, chemicals, textiles, cement, glass.

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Maputo city is good and safe. The expats do not have any difficulties but there are some of the areas where caution is needed. Most of the cities have Indian communities, Hindu temples, Indian Restaurants, theatres where Indian movies are often released, and Indian Channels are also telecasted. Hence social life is good for expats. 

Educational Facilities: Maputo has better international schools than another province of the Mozambique but the cost of education in Maputo is quite high, the cost of education varies from USD 250 per month to USD 800 per month depending upon the curriculum adopted by the school i.e. African Curriculum, Cambridge Curriculum or International Curriculum.

Medical Facilities: The cities like Maputo, Beira and Tete have average medical facilities for diseases like common cold, flu, etc. but the resources are limited for complex diseases.   Apart from these cities medical facilities remain poor in other cities of Mozambique. There are also Indian doctors available in Maputo but the expenses for the treatments and medicines remain high.

Major Industries: The major industries in Mozambique are petroleum, steel manufacturing, fertilizers, food & beverages, cement & glass. Also, the country has rich farmland in its northern regions and vast, untapped sources of coal and natural gas.

Political Environment: Mozambique has presidential government and current government is stable, but there is some instability in north Mozambique where recently the oil & gas has been found around 800-900 kilo meters from Nacala due to which some terrorist activities were found.

Job Opportunities for Expats: The opportunities for expats is good and abundant as the country is still developing. As the cost of living is high in the country, accommodation and all basic services are mostly provided by the employers. The personal expenses of a single expat living in Mozambique is up to USD 400 per month.
 
 

Description:

Capital City

Maputo

Country Code

+258

Currency

Mozambican Metical (MZN)

(1 INR = 0.882413 MZN)

(1 USD = 66.5033 MZN)

President

Filipe Nyusi

Official language

Portuguese

Government

Presidential System

Population

31.26 million (2020)

Time Difference to India

Mozambique is 3.30 hours behind India









Mozambique is located on South-east of Africa and is bordered by Tanzania, South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi.

Capital City- Maputo: It is the largest city in Mozambique. It has major production of agricultural products like cotton, cashew nuts, sugarcane, tea, corn, coconuts, tropical fruits, potatoes and manufacturing of Industrial products like aluminium products, petroleum products, chemicals, textiles, cement, glass.

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Maputo city is good and safe. The expats do not have any difficulties but there are some of the areas where caution is needed. Most of the cities have Indian communities, Hindu temples, Indian Restaurants, theatres where Indian movies are often released, and Indian Channels are also telecasted. Hence social life is good for expats. 

Educational Facilities: Maputo has better international schools than another province of the Mozambique but the cost of education in Maputo is quite high, the cost of education varies from USD 250 per month to USD 800 per month depending upon the curriculum adopted by the school i.e. African Curriculum, Cambridge Curriculum or International Curriculum.

Medical Facilities: The cities like Maputo, Beira and Tete have average medical facilities for diseases like common cold, flu, etc. but the resources are limited for complex diseases.   Apart from these cities medical facilities remain poor in other cities of Mozambique. There are also Indian doctors available in Maputo but the expenses for the treatments and medicines remain high.

Major Industries: The major industries in Mozambique are petroleum, steel manufacturing, fertilizers, food & beverages, cement & glass. Also, the country has rich farmland in its northern regions and vast, untapped sources of coal and natural gas.

Political Environment: Mozambique has presidential government and current government is stable, but there is some instability in north Mozambique where recently the oil & gas has been found around 800-900 kilo meters from Nacala due to which some terrorist activities were found.

Job Opportunities for Expats: The opportunities for expats is good and abundant as the country is still developing. As the cost of living is high in the country, accommodation and all basic services are mostly provided by the employers. The personal expenses of a single expat living in Mozambique is up to USD 400 per month.
 
 

Related Keyphrases:

PresidentFilipe NyusiOfficial languagePortugueseGovernmentPresidential | cities medical facilities | average medical facilities | Indian doctors available | Capital CityMaputoCountry | agricultural products | presidential government | Educational Facilities | petroleum products | Indian communities | Indian Restaurants | Industrial products | Cambridge Curriculum | north Mozambique | aluminium products

Capital City

Dodoma

Currency

Tanzanian Shilling

(1 TZS = 0.033 INR)

(1 USD = 2300 TZS)

President

John Magufuli

Official language

Swahili, English, Arabic

Government

President System, Unitary, Republic

Population

56 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Tanzania is 02.30 hours behind India

Country code

+255










Capital City- Dodoma: Dodoma, being located in the centre of the country, is the capital of Tanzania. The population is primarily agricultural and is engaged in small-scale farming. Dodoma is a market centre for peanuts (groundnuts), castor beans, sunflower seeds, gum, corn (maize), rice, wheat, coffee, tea, tobacco, and sorghum. Coffee and sisal are cultivated in the northern part of the region, and cattle raising is important throughout the region. 

Largest City – Dar es Salaam: Dar es Salaam is the largest city in East Africa & industrial center of Tanzania being situated in the coastal region. It is the second busiest port in East Africa. It is the former capital of Tanzania. It is among one of the fastest growing cities in the world. 

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Tanzania has improved evidently and the crime rate is much lesser than the other African Countries. Politeness, respect and modesty are virtues that highly valued by Tanzanians. One can easily find Indian Supermarket, Indian Restaurants in Dar es Salaam. Indian expats can avail benefits of watching Indian channels by subscribing DTSV (cable service provider)

Educational Facilities: There are a number of international schools in Tanzania. Private primary schools are very few, and they are English medium and expensive. Also the quality of education of International and private schools is only good enough till primary.

Medical Facilities: The risk of catching a serious infectious disease is quite high so it is necessary to take proper medical precautions. Malaria-carrying mosquitoes is a major problem in Tanzania. The quality of local medical facilities in Tanzania is often well below the standard of those in Western countries. Most expats visit an expat health clinic in their city of residence when they are in need of medical care.

Major Industries: Tanzania’s economy is the 12th largest in Africa and the 2nd largest in East African community. The major industries in the country include agriculture, mining, and manufacturing among others. Agricultural activities in Tanzania involve coffee, sisal, cashew nuts and cotton as major export products. Mining is one of the country's main industries. Some of the exports are gold, tanzanite, diamonds

Political Environment: Tanzania has undergone impressive political and economic developments and improvements in social welfare in recent years. However, the country continues to face challenges, such as economic distribution, population growth and corruption. Growth rates have been remarkably stable over the last decade.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Tanzania is still a relatively poor country and a significant number of the population still live in poverty. Manufacturing, IT and tourism are some strong sectors in which expats can look for work. Apart from Tanzania’s economic centre Dar es Salaam, there are other cities preferred by expats. Arusha — also known as Tanzania’s diplomatic hub — is one of them. Also, there are opportunities in Tanzania in field of agriculture, manufacturing, mining.

Description:

Capital City

Dodoma

Currency

Tanzanian Shilling

(1 TZS = 0.033 INR)

(1 USD = 2300 TZS)

President

John Magufuli

Official language

Swahili, English, Arabic

Government

President System, Unitary, Republic

Population

56 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Tanzania is 02.30 hours behind India

Country code

+255










Capital City- Dodoma: Dodoma, being located in the centre of the country, is the capital of Tanzania. The population is primarily agricultural and is engaged in small-scale farming. Dodoma is a market centre for peanuts (groundnuts), castor beans, sunflower seeds, gum, corn (maize), rice, wheat, coffee, tea, tobacco, and sorghum. Coffee and sisal are cultivated in the northern part of the region, and cattle raising is important throughout the region. 

Largest City – Dar es Salaam: Dar es Salaam is the largest city in East Africa & industrial center of Tanzania being situated in the coastal region. It is the second busiest port in East Africa. It is the former capital of Tanzania. It is among one of the fastest growing cities in the world. 

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Tanzania has improved evidently and the crime rate is much lesser than the other African Countries. Politeness, respect and modesty are virtues that highly valued by Tanzanians. One can easily find Indian Supermarket, Indian Restaurants in Dar es Salaam. Indian expats can avail benefits of watching Indian channels by subscribing DTSV (cable service provider)

Educational Facilities: There are a number of international schools in Tanzania. Private primary schools are very few, and they are English medium and expensive. Also the quality of education of International and private schools is only good enough till primary.

Medical Facilities: The risk of catching a serious infectious disease is quite high so it is necessary to take proper medical precautions. Malaria-carrying mosquitoes is a major problem in Tanzania. The quality of local medical facilities in Tanzania is often well below the standard of those in Western countries. Most expats visit an expat health clinic in their city of residence when they are in need of medical care.

Major Industries: Tanzania’s economy is the 12th largest in Africa and the 2nd largest in East African community. The major industries in the country include agriculture, mining, and manufacturing among others. Agricultural activities in Tanzania involve coffee, sisal, cashew nuts and cotton as major export products. Mining is one of the country's main industries. Some of the exports are gold, tanzanite, diamonds

Political Environment: Tanzania has undergone impressive political and economic developments and improvements in social welfare in recent years. However, the country continues to face challenges, such as economic distribution, population growth and corruption. Growth rates have been remarkably stable over the last decade.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Tanzania is still a relatively poor country and a significant number of the population still live in poverty. Manufacturing, IT and tourism are some strong sectors in which expats can look for work. Apart from Tanzania’s economic centre Dar es Salaam, there are other cities preferred by expats. Arusha — also known as Tanzania’s diplomatic hub — is one of them. Also, there are opportunities in Tanzania in field of agriculture, manufacturing, mining.

Related Keyphrases:

s economic centre Dar es Salaam | undergone impressive political | proper medical precautions | Private primary schools | local medical facilities | serious infectious disease | East African community | international schools | Agricultural activities | economic distribution | major export products | economic developments | cable service provider | Tanzania

Capital City

Maputo

Country Code

+258

Currency

Mozambican Metical (MZN)

(1 INR = 0.882413 MZN)

(1 USD = 66.5033 MZN)

President

Filipe Nyusi

Official language

Portuguese

Government

Presidential System

Population

31.26 million (2020)

Time Difference to India

Mozambique is 3.30 hours behind India








Mozambique is located on South-east of Africa and is bordered by Tanzania, South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi.

Capital City- Maputo: It is the largest city in Mozambique. It has major production of agricultural products like cotton, cashew nuts, sugarcane, tea, corn, coconuts, tropical fruits, potatoes and manufacturing of Industrial products like aluminum products, petroleum products, chemicals, textiles, cement, glass.

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Maputo city is good and safe. The expats do not have any difficulties but there are some of the areas where caution is needed. Most of the cities have Indian communities, Hindu temples, Indian Restaurants, theaters where Indian movies are often released, and Indian Channels are also telecasted. Hence social life is good for expats. 

Educational Facilities: Maputo has better international schools than another province of the Mozambique but the cost of education in Maputo is quite high, the cost of education varies from USD 250 per month to USD 800 per month depending upon the curriculum adopted by the school i.e. African Curriculum, Cambridge Curriculum or International Curriculum.

Medical Facilities: The cities like Maputo, Beira and Tete have average medical facilities for diseases like common cold, flu, etc. but the resources are limited for complex diseases.   Apart from these cities medical facilities remain poor in other cities of Mozambique. There are also Indian doctors available in Maputo but the expenses for the treatments and medicines remain high.

Major Industries: The major industries in Mozambique are petroleum, steel manufacturing, fertilizers, food & beverages, cement & glass. Also, the country has rich farmland in its northern regions and vast, untapped sources of coal and natural gas.

Political Environment: Mozambique has presidential government and current government is stable, but there is some instability in north Mozambique where recently the oil & gas has been found around 800-900 kilo meters from Nacala due to which some terrorist activities were found.

Job Opportunities for Expats: The opportunities for expats is good and abundant as the country is still developing. As the cost of living is high in the country, accommodation and all basic services are mostly provided by the employers. The personal expenses of a single expat living in Mozambique is up to USD 400 per month.
 
 

Description:

Capital City

Maputo

Country Code

+258

Currency

Mozambican Metical (MZN)

(1 INR = 0.882413 MZN)

(1 USD = 66.5033 MZN)

President

Filipe Nyusi

Official language

Portuguese

Government

Presidential System

Population

31.26 million (2020)

Time Difference to India

Mozambique is 3.30 hours behind India








Mozambique is located on South-east of Africa and is bordered by Tanzania, South Africa, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi.

Capital City- Maputo: It is the largest city in Mozambique. It has major production of agricultural products like cotton, cashew nuts, sugarcane, tea, corn, coconuts, tropical fruits, potatoes and manufacturing of Industrial products like aluminum products, petroleum products, chemicals, textiles, cement, glass.

Cultural and Social Environment: The overall security in Maputo city is good and safe. The expats do not have any difficulties but there are some of the areas where caution is needed. Most of the cities have Indian communities, Hindu temples, Indian Restaurants, theaters where Indian movies are often released, and Indian Channels are also telecasted. Hence social life is good for expats. 

Educational Facilities: Maputo has better international schools than another province of the Mozambique but the cost of education in Maputo is quite high, the cost of education varies from USD 250 per month to USD 800 per month depending upon the curriculum adopted by the school i.e. African Curriculum, Cambridge Curriculum or International Curriculum.

Medical Facilities: The cities like Maputo, Beira and Tete have average medical facilities for diseases like common cold, flu, etc. but the resources are limited for complex diseases.   Apart from these cities medical facilities remain poor in other cities of Mozambique. There are also Indian doctors available in Maputo but the expenses for the treatments and medicines remain high.

Major Industries: The major industries in Mozambique are petroleum, steel manufacturing, fertilizers, food & beverages, cement & glass. Also, the country has rich farmland in its northern regions and vast, untapped sources of coal and natural gas.

Political Environment: Mozambique has presidential government and current government is stable, but there is some instability in north Mozambique where recently the oil & gas has been found around 800-900 kilo meters from Nacala due to which some terrorist activities were found.

Job Opportunities for Expats: The opportunities for expats is good and abundant as the country is still developing. As the cost of living is high in the country, accommodation and all basic services are mostly provided by the employers. The personal expenses of a single expat living in Mozambique is up to USD 400 per month.
 
 

Related Keyphrases:

cities medical facilities | average medical facilities | Indian doctors available | agricultural products | presidential government | petroleum products | Indian communities | Indian Restaurants | Industrial products | Cambridge Curriculum | north Mozambique | international schools | terrorist activities | African Curriculum | single expat living

Capital City

Accra

Currency

Ghanaian Cedi

(1 GHS = 13.08 INR)

(1 GHS = 0.17 USD)

President

Nana Akufo-Addo

Official language

English

Government

Unitary Presidential Constitutional Republic

Population

2.88 crores (2017) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Ghana is 05.30 hours behind India









Capital City- Accra:  It is the largest and most densely populated city in Ghana. Economic activities in Accra include the financial and commercial sectors, fishing and the manufacture of processed food, lumber, textiles, clothing and chemicals. Tourism is becoming a thriving source of business for those in arts and crafts, historical sites and local travel and tour agents.

Cultural and Social Environment: Ghana is regarded as one of the safest countries in Africa. Petty level crimes are there but violence against expatriates is minimal as compared to other African countries. Indian Cultural society is there where Indians gather during festival. It has National Parks, museums, beaches, supermarkets etc. Indian daily soaps are very popular in Ghana and people watch them very fondly. One can watch Indian TC channels like Star TV, Sony Liv, Sony Sab. Every week, Indian movies are getting released in Ghana.

Educational Facilities: Educational facility in Ghana is better than other neighboring countries. It has CBSE, ICSE and local Ghanaian schools. Education cost for up to graduation may cost around USD 4000 to 12000 per year depending on the level of education. 

Medical Facilities: Indian hospitals and mutli specialty hospitals are available in Ghana. Medical staff majorly consists of local people, but we can find Indian doctors and nurses in some hospitals. Medical cost is relatively high and risky, so it is suggested not to undergo any serious medical treatment in Ghana. 

Major Industries: Industrial sector comprise of Manufacturing (mainly plastic, packaging and food), oil and gas and mining.

Political Environment:  Ghana adopted unitary presidential constitutional democracy after 1993, until then it was under military rule. Ghana is a political stable country and attracts many foreign investors to invest in Ghana which helps economy to boom.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Ghana has ample amount of opportunities which attracts many expatriates. There are various communities formed by expatriates which helps them to stay together and enjoy during festivals. Average cost of living per person in Ghana is USD 1300 to USD 1700 per month (including rent, utilities, driver, maid etc).

Description:

Capital City

Accra

Currency

Ghanaian Cedi

(1 GHS = 13.08 INR)

(1 GHS = 0.17 USD)

President

Nana Akufo-Addo

Official language

English

Government

Unitary Presidential Constitutional Republic

Population

2.88 crores (2017) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Ghana is 05.30 hours behind India









Capital City- Accra:  It is the largest and most densely populated city in Ghana. Economic activities in Accra include the financial and commercial sectors, fishing and the manufacture of processed food, lumber, textiles, clothing and chemicals. Tourism is becoming a thriving source of business for those in arts and crafts, historical sites and local travel and tour agents.

Cultural and Social Environment: Ghana is regarded as one of the safest countries in Africa. Petty level crimes are there but violence against expatriates is minimal as compared to other African countries. Indian Cultural society is there where Indians gather during festival. It has National Parks, museums, beaches, supermarkets etc. Indian daily soaps are very popular in Ghana and people watch them very fondly. One can watch Indian TC channels like Star TV, Sony Liv, Sony Sab. Every week, Indian movies are getting released in Ghana.

Educational Facilities: Educational facility in Ghana is better than other neighboring countries. It has CBSE, ICSE and local Ghanaian schools. Education cost for up to graduation may cost around USD 4000 to 12000 per year depending on the level of education. 

Medical Facilities: Indian hospitals and mutli specialty hospitals are available in Ghana. Medical staff majorly consists of local people, but we can find Indian doctors and nurses in some hospitals. Medical cost is relatively high and risky, so it is suggested not to undergo any serious medical treatment in Ghana. 

Major Industries: Industrial sector comprise of Manufacturing (mainly plastic, packaging and food), oil and gas and mining.

Political Environment:  Ghana adopted unitary presidential constitutional democracy after 1993, until then it was under military rule. Ghana is a political stable country and attracts many foreign investors to invest in Ghana which helps economy to boom.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Ghana has ample amount of opportunities which attracts many expatriates. There are various communities formed by expatriates which helps them to stay together and enjoy during festivals. Average cost of living per person in Ghana is USD 1300 to USD 1700 per month (including rent, utilities, driver, maid etc).

Related Keyphrases:

unitary presidential constitutional democracy | Indian Cultural society | Industrial sector comprise | serious medical treatment | local Ghanaian schools | political stable country | Indian TC channels | Indian hospitals | many foreign investors | Indian daily soaps | specialty hospitals | Educational facility | Indian doctors | Petty level crimes | African countries

Capital City

Luanda

Currency

Angolan Kwanza

(1 AOA = 0.15 INR)

(1 AOA = 0.0020 USD)

President

João Lourenço

Official language

Portuguese

Government

President System, Unitary, Republic

Population

32.87 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Angola is 04.30 hours behind India








Capital City: Luanda is the largest city in Angola and World’s most expensive city. It is an Industrial Centre majorly manufacturing beverages, automotive products, and cement. Also, Agricultural products produced in the Luanda include coffee, cotton, sugarcane, oilseeds, and palm oil and kernels; cattle raising is locally important.

Cultural and Social Environment: The Overall security in Angola and Luanda city has improved markedly and the crime rate is much lesser than the other African Countries for the expats residing. There are Beaches, Temples, Indian Restaurants, Indian Supermarkets. Recently, the Indian Movie (Dabbang 3) and Telugu Movie are released and Indian Channels like Sab TV, Sony TV, Zee TV Etc. are also telecasted.

Educational Facilities: Luanda has many American and Portugal schools around the city. The international schools are available till higher secondary, but syllabus and quality of education is only good enough till 5th grade. Also, education is very expensive (Nursery school fees for a child is approximately 500 USD per month.)

Medical Facilities: There are only Portuguese Hospitals in Angola, doctors and medicines are available to some extnet, but it may be expensive, and Expats are suggested not to take treatment in Angola and travel back to their home country.

Major Industries: The Industrial Sector is dominated by Four Major Industries- Aviation Industry, Mining, Food & Beverage and Hotel & Tourism.

Political Environment: Angola adopted new constitution in 2010, since then Angola has stable, quick and responsive government mostly dominated by Socialist Principles, but the economic stability is not at par.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Luanda is a hub for expats who come to build their career in Angola. These expats in Angola form insular committees in Luanda where most of their travel and stay are organized by their Employer as the cost of living independently is quite high compared to the neighboring, Average cost of renting a house for a middle working class is about 500 USD.

Description:

Capital City

Luanda

Currency

Angolan Kwanza

(1 AOA = 0.15 INR)

(1 AOA = 0.0020 USD)

President

João Lourenço

Official language

Portuguese

Government

President System, Unitary, Republic

Population

32.87 Million (2019) World Bank

Time Difference to India

Angola is 04.30 hours behind India








Capital City: Luanda is the largest city in Angola and World’s most expensive city. It is an Industrial Centre majorly manufacturing beverages, automotive products, and cement. Also, Agricultural products produced in the Luanda include coffee, cotton, sugarcane, oilseeds, and palm oil and kernels; cattle raising is locally important.

Cultural and Social Environment: The Overall security in Angola and Luanda city has improved markedly and the crime rate is much lesser than the other African Countries for the expats residing. There are Beaches, Temples, Indian Restaurants, Indian Supermarkets. Recently, the Indian Movie (Dabbang 3) and Telugu Movie are released and Indian Channels like Sab TV, Sony TV, Zee TV Etc. are also telecasted.

Educational Facilities: Luanda has many American and Portugal schools around the city. The international schools are available till higher secondary, but syllabus and quality of education is only good enough till 5th grade. Also, education is very expensive (Nursery school fees for a child is approximately 500 USD per month.)

Medical Facilities: There are only Portuguese Hospitals in Angola, doctors and medicines are available to some extnet, but it may be expensive, and Expats are suggested not to take treatment in Angola and travel back to their home country.

Major Industries: The Industrial Sector is dominated by Four Major Industries- Aviation Industry, Mining, Food & Beverage and Hotel & Tourism.

Political Environment: Angola adopted new constitution in 2010, since then Angola has stable, quick and responsive government mostly dominated by Socialist Principles, but the economic stability is not at par.

Job Opportunities for Expats: Luanda is a hub for expats who come to build their career in Angola. These expats in Angola form insular committees in Luanda where most of their travel and stay are organized by their Employer as the cost of living independently is quite high compared to the neighboring, Average cost of renting a house for a middle working class is about 500 USD.

Related Keyphrases:

Angola form insular committees | manufacturing beverages | Agricultural products | Indian Supermarkets | international schools | responsive government | Indian Restaurants | automotive products | Portuguese Hospitals | Socialist Principles | Nursery school fees | Social Environment | Luanda city | Industrial Centre | expensive city

A shocking number of senior managers across emerging markets have suddenly found themselves unemployed. In regions where top talent is so scarce, it is amazing to find so many candidates who are struggling to find another job despite having impressive resumes and experience in leading companies. These candidates seem to be caught in the Top Talent Trap

 

Fat at the top?

One of the main causes of the lack of opportunity for senior managers is the withdrawal or downsizing of many multinationals from the region. Multinationals entered the market and quickly created a bonanza for employees as they poached candidates from local organisations and bid up salaries. With multiple employment offers, candidates found themselves attracting higher and higher salaries as companies struggled to hang on to their hard won talent. Despite the resulting cost pressures, companies accepted the impact on profitability, by convincing themselves that it would all be worth it in the long run.
 
Unfortunately, the recent economic downturn has led to a further deterioration in performance and a rapid rethink of prospects in the region. Faced with strong local competition, which is often owner managed and leaner, multinationals have quickly realised the need to rationalise their cost structures in order to compete.

The war for talent has quickly turned into a bloodbath as entire layers of the organisation are cut. Gone are the regional level managers, and companies have returned to country level management reporting directly to their head offices in an effort to stem losses by cutting costs.

 

Overpaid senior managers?

A number of senior managers with good experience still find themselves out of a job months after being retrenched or resigning. This is due to the mismatch between their last compensation package and the current market opportunities. When the multinationals entered new markets such as Africa in the early part of the decade, salaries for the lucky few ballooned as they were headhunted and offered substantial increments to switch jobs. As the need for talent intensified, salaries were bid up and soon reached stratospheric levels. Unfortunately, when the tide turned these very same stars found themselves left high and dry, as the jobs disappeared and the companies left behind found their packages to be unaffordable.  With salaries having been bid up in the past, companies have also realised that cutting a handful of senior managers from the organisation has a much greater impact on costs than trying to reduce workers at lower levels.

Many of the affected managers that we have recently spoken to, have expressed a willingness to take a reduction in compensation.  However employers are naturally cautious, fearing that anyone taking a cut will likely continue to be on the look out for better opportunities and therefore unlikely to be a stable hire. 

There are clearly ways to mitigate these risks and in our view this is the time for employers to take advantage of the availability of so much talent.

If you are looking for some great candidates, then feel free to reach out and we can help work with you to bridge the gap in expectations to find a win-win solution for both parties. 


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions in Executive Search and Recruitment solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Description:

A shocking number of senior managers across emerging markets have suddenly found themselves unemployed. In regions where top talent is so scarce, it is amazing to find so many candidates who are struggling to find another job despite having impressive resumes and experience in leading companies. These candidates seem to be caught in the Top Talent Trap

 

Fat at the top?

One of the main causes of the lack of opportunity for senior managers is the withdrawal or downsizing of many multinationals from the region. Multinationals entered the market and quickly created a bonanza for employees as they poached candidates from local organisations and bid up salaries. With multiple employment offers, candidates found themselves attracting higher and higher salaries as companies struggled to hang on to their hard won talent. Despite the resulting cost pressures, companies accepted the impact on profitability, by convincing themselves that it would all be worth it in the long run.
 
Unfortunately, the recent economic downturn has led to a further deterioration in performance and a rapid rethink of prospects in the region. Faced with strong local competition, which is often owner managed and leaner, multinationals have quickly realised the need to rationalise their cost structures in order to compete.

The war for talent has quickly turned into a bloodbath as entire layers of the organisation are cut. Gone are the regional level managers, and companies have returned to country level management reporting directly to their head offices in an effort to stem losses by cutting costs.

 

Overpaid senior managers?

A number of senior managers with good experience still find themselves out of a job months after being retrenched or resigning. This is due to the mismatch between their last compensation package and the current market opportunities. When the multinationals entered new markets such as Africa in the early part of the decade, salaries for the lucky few ballooned as they were headhunted and offered substantial increments to switch jobs. As the need for talent intensified, salaries were bid up and soon reached stratospheric levels. Unfortunately, when the tide turned these very same stars found themselves left high and dry, as the jobs disappeared and the companies left behind found their packages to be unaffordable.  With salaries having been bid up in the past, companies have also realised that cutting a handful of senior managers from the organisation has a much greater impact on costs than trying to reduce workers at lower levels.

Many of the affected managers that we have recently spoken to, have expressed a willingness to take a reduction in compensation.  However employers are naturally cautious, fearing that anyone taking a cut will likely continue to be on the look out for better opportunities and therefore unlikely to be a stable hire. 

There are clearly ways to mitigate these risks and in our view this is the time for employers to take advantage of the availability of so much talent.

If you are looking for some great candidates, then feel free to reach out and we can help work with you to bridge the gap in expectations to find a win-win solution for both parties. 


This article was written by Nikunj Shah, the former founder and CEO of Datum Recruitment Services, and now founder and leader at Select Global Solutions in Executive Search and Recruitment solutions across Africa, India and other Emerging Markets. To speak to Nikunj about your talent requirements, get in touch at info@selectglobal.co.in 

Related Keyphrases:

current market opportunities | regional level managers | multiple employment offers | last compensation package | strong local competition | senior managers | country level management | talent requirements | recent economic downturn | talent intensified | Select Global Solutions | Recruitment solutions | substantial increments | many multinationals | stratospheric levels

The Long Service Award. Cherished by organisations as a sign of how great they are as employers. Sought after by employees as a recognition of their loyalty to the company (and hopefully to get a gold watch). Lauded by leaders as a sign of their excellent people management skills. But are companies and employees doing themselves a disservice by failing to part ways? Is it time to retire the long service award?

In the past, the loyalty of an individual to a company and vice versa has been measured primarily by their length of service in the company. However, in the age of millennials, is the longevity of an individual in the company really a good barometer of their loyalty?

As a leading HR professional said to me recently;


“the workforce is getting younger and younger, and for this population it is not considered a “great” thing to work for the same organization for years and to work one’s way up the ranks.  They will move whenever and wherever an opportunity presents itself -looking for the fastest way up the career ladder.  So we may have to re-think what loyalty looks like in the modern day workplace – can it be measured purely by length of service?”


There are clearly advantages of retaining the best individuals in a company for longer periods – lower recruitment costs, more committed employees, improved company morale, and hopefully a better organisational performance. However, are employees staying in the organisation because they are loyal, or simply because either they are too lazy to move or feel unable to find a better role outside? Are they staying simply because they don’t feel there is anywhere else for them to go?
 

Companies that have low levels of churn and very stable workforces are often admired for their ability to retain talent. On the other hand, are employees who jump ship every couple of years really disloyal, or do they allow for a continuous refreshment of ideas and enhancement of energy in the organisation? As the senior HR professional we spoke to mentioned:
 

“On the flip side, there are also those organisations that have become terribly risk-averse and do not want to take the risk of hiring new employees… one would say they are exceedingly loyal to their employees.  The employee turnover rates in those organisations are extremely low, which in turn leaves no room for new talent to come in and breathe fresh air into the organization”

 

In addition to the lack of room for new talent, the organisations with a very stable workforce also become unattractive to new talent. If there is no churn in the management structure of the organisation, where do employees find opportunities for career progression? In many companies, it would make sense to retire some of the older workers in order to attract fresh talent who could bring in new ideas and new energy to the organisation.

 

A number of our clients are increasingly struggling to find a balance between loyalty and performance in the organisation. How do leaders manage the very different behaviours between older workers and millenials? What is the right time for an employee to move on from a company? If employees are stuck in their roles, where are the opportunities for advancement amongst the younger workforce?

There is clearly no simple answer to the above questions, however it pays for leaders to think through the choices that they are making and understand the costs and benefits of each choice they make.

Description:

The Long Service Award. Cherished by organisations as a sign of how great they are as employers. Sought after by employees as a recognition of their loyalty to the company (and hopefully to get a gold watch). Lauded by leaders as a sign of their excellent people management skills. But are companies and employees doing themselves a disservice by failing to part ways? Is it time to retire the long service award?

In the past, the loyalty of an individual to a company and vice versa has been measured primarily by their length of service in the company. However, in the age of millennials, is the longevity of an individual in the company really a good barometer of their loyalty?

As a leading HR professional said to me recently;


“the workforce is getting younger and younger, and for this population it is not considered a “great” thing to work for the same organization for years and to work one’s way up the ranks.  They will move whenever and wherever an opportunity presents itself -looking for the fastest way up the career ladder.  So we may have to re-think what loyalty looks like in the modern day workplace – can it be measured purely by length of service?”


There are clearly advantages of retaining the best individuals in a company for longer periods – lower recruitment costs, more committed employees, improved company morale, and hopefully a better organisational performance. However, are employees staying in the organisation because they are loyal, or simply because either they are too lazy to move or feel unable to find a better role outside? Are they staying simply because they don’t feel there is anywhere else for them to go?
 

Companies that have low levels of churn and very stable workforces are often admired for their ability to retain talent. On the other hand, are employees who jump ship every couple of years really disloyal, or do they allow for a continuous refreshment of ideas and enhancement of energy in the organisation? As the senior HR professional we spoke to mentioned:
 

“On the flip side, there are also those organisations that have become terribly risk-averse and do not want to take the risk of hiring new employees… one would say they are exceedingly loyal to their employees.  The employee turnover rates in those organisations are extremely low, which in turn leaves no room for new talent to come in and breathe fresh air into the organization”

 

In addition to the lack of room for new talent, the organisations with a very stable workforce also become unattractive to new talent. If there is no churn in the management structure of the organisation, where do employees find opportunities for career progression? In many companies, it would make sense to retire some of the older workers in order to attract fresh talent who could bring in new ideas and new energy to the organisation.

 

A number of our clients are increasingly struggling to find a balance between loyalty and performance in the organisation. How do leaders manage the very different behaviours between older workers and millenials? What is the right time for an employee to move on from a company? If employees are stuck in their roles, where are the opportunities for advancement amongst the younger workforce?

There is clearly no simple answer to the above questions, however it pays for leaders to think through the choices that they are making and understand the costs and benefits of each choice they make.

Related Keyphrases:

excellent people management skills | better organisational performance | new employees | attract fresh talent | senior HR professional | employee turnover rates | continuous refreshment | management structure | company morale | different behaviours | new talent | become unattractive | career progression | breathe fresh air | recruitment costs

In our recent discussions with clients and candidates, an interesting pattern is emerging which may have some very serious consequences for companies' talent acquisition plans and for the careers of senior management.

Following years of robust growth in emerging markets, the war for talent amongst businesses resulted in boom times for employees. Skilled workers were constantly being headhunted as companies tried desperately to maintain their talent pool as they scaled. This led to frequent job changes and rapid increases in remuneration as employees took advantage of the environment. One of the biggest complaints we heard was about the lack of loyalty amongst their workers.
 
As economies have started to recover, companies are once again looking to rebuild their talent pools. However, they are wary of employing individuals who were previously moving from one organisation to another. On the other hand, employees are wary of taking up assignments with organisations that until recently were still reducing headcount. Hence, despite the number of excellent candidates in the market, and a number of very interesting opportunities, many roles are still left unfilled as the mutual risk aversion leads to reluctance from both sides to close the deal.
 
Recently however, companies in emerging markets have been faced with a number of headwinds. Economic growth is falling in a number of countries due to both local and external factors such as elections, fiscal tightening by governments and weak macroeconomic conditions.

Faced with these challenges a number of companies have resorted to downsizing programmes in order to maintain competitiveness. Many employees have found themselves suddenly unemployed. In a few cases, redundancies have taken place in only a few months following the appointment of the employee in the organisation.

These abrupt changes have left many workers scarred and therefore far more risk averse. Those still in employment have also been affected as they hear the news of their friends losing their jobs. There are a number of very highly qualified and talented people who are suddenly looking for work. At the same time, those currently employed are now ultra cautious about making a change. Now workers complain about a lack of loyalty from their employers!

Is your organisation facing a similar situation? What is the solution? Let's have a chat and see if we can help you bridge this gap. 

Description:

In our recent discussions with clients and candidates, an interesting pattern is emerging which may have some very serious consequences for companies' talent acquisition plans and for the careers of senior management.

Following years of robust growth in emerging markets, the war for talent amongst businesses resulted in boom times for employees. Skilled workers were constantly being headhunted as companies tried desperately to maintain their talent pool as they scaled. This led to frequent job changes and rapid increases in remuneration as employees took advantage of the environment. One of the biggest complaints we heard was about the lack of loyalty amongst their workers.
 
As economies have started to recover, companies are once again looking to rebuild their talent pools. However, they are wary of employing individuals who were previously moving from one organisation to another. On the other hand, employees are wary of taking up assignments with organisations that until recently were still reducing headcount. Hence, despite the number of excellent candidates in the market, and a number of very interesting opportunities, many roles are still left unfilled as the mutual risk aversion leads to reluctance from both sides to close the deal.
 
Recently however, companies in emerging markets have been faced with a number of headwinds. Economic growth is falling in a number of countries due to both local and external factors such as elections, fiscal tightening by governments and weak macroeconomic conditions.

Faced with these challenges a number of companies have resorted to downsizing programmes in order to maintain competitiveness. Many employees have found themselves suddenly unemployed. In a few cases, redundancies have taken place in only a few months following the appointment of the employee in the organisation.

These abrupt changes have left many workers scarred and therefore far more risk averse. Those still in employment have also been affected as they hear the news of their friends losing their jobs. There are a number of very highly qualified and talented people who are suddenly looking for work. At the same time, those currently employed are now ultra cautious about making a change. Now workers complain about a lack of loyalty from their employers!

Is your organisation facing a similar situation? What is the solution? Let's have a chat and see if we can help you bridge this gap. 

Related Keyphrases:

talent amongst businesses | talent acquisition plans | frequent job changes | mutual risk aversion | excellent candidates | serious consequences | recent discussions | weak macroeconomic | similar situation | one organisation | loyalty amongst | Many employees | external factors | Economic growth | many workers

If you are looking for a job in Nigeria today, then things may be a little difficult at this time. Following the balance of payments crisis and dollar shortages caused by the collapse in oil prices in 2016, the economy went into a free fall with companies unable to secure foreign exchange to run their operations. For the following couple of years, most companies laid of workers and shrunk their operations in a bid to survive. Many foreign investors exited the country and those that continued focused on survival.

Following the recovery in oil prices and some improvement in the availability of foreign exchange following devaluation of the Naira, there was a short term spurt in hiring as companies who had made deep cuts in headcount suddenly found themselves short staffed as demand started improving.

How do things look today? On the surface, there should be a continued recovery in the job market as the economy continues to recover, driven by higher oil prices and a more stable macroeconomic environment.

However, with Christmas just around the corner, and the prospect of elections in February, with results to be announced in May, we feel that many employers will delay their hiring decisions except for the most urgent requirements.

For those in Nigeria right now, what do you think? Are my fears justified or is the situation better than we suspect?

To find out more about recruiting senior talent in Nigeria, get in touch today and discover our bespoke solutions for talent acquisition for your business.

Description:

If you are looking for a job in Nigeria today, then things may be a little difficult at this time. Following the balance of payments crisis and dollar shortages caused by the collapse in oil prices in 2016, the economy went into a free fall with companies unable to secure foreign exchange to run their operations. For the following couple of years, most companies laid of workers and shrunk their operations in a bid to survive. Many foreign investors exited the country and those that continued focused on survival.

Following the recovery in oil prices and some improvement in the availability of foreign exchange following devaluation of the Naira, there was a short term spurt in hiring as companies who had made deep cuts in headcount suddenly found themselves short staffed as demand started improving.

How do things look today? On the surface, there should be a continued recovery in the job market as the economy continues to recover, driven by higher oil prices and a more stable macroeconomic environment.

However, with Christmas just around the corner, and the prospect of elections in February, with results to be announced in May, we feel that many employers will delay their hiring decisions except for the most urgent requirements.

For those in Nigeria right now, what do you think? Are my fears justified or is the situation better than we suspect?

To find out more about recruiting senior talent in Nigeria, get in touch today and discover our bespoke solutions for talent acquisition for your business.

Related Keyphrases:

secure foreign exchange | recruiting senior talent | Many foreign investors | stable macroeconomic | talent acquisition | companies unable | bespoke solutions | Nigeria today | dollar shortages | payments crisis | short staffed | oil prices | many employers | touch today | availability

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit???or a mismatch???is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person ??? where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things ??? attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.

At Select Search Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option componenets are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Description:

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit???or a mismatch???is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person ??? where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things ??? attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.

At Select Search Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option componenets are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Related Keyphrases:

find high potential candidates | Traditional recruitment solutions | different compensation structures | Finding motivated people | several recruitment agencies | right soft skills | prospective candidates | important funding ecosystem | communication skills | proper recruiting process | Finding natural leaders | good candidates | right skills | consumer internet space | Select Search Solutions

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit—or a mismatch—is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person — where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things – attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.


At Select Global Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option components are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Description:

It is a great time for start-ups in India with high-quality entrepreneurs, good ideas and the very important funding ecosystem in the form of angel investors, seed capital, growth capital and PEs.

With an increasing number of start-ups emerging into the consumer internet space, there is a demand for skilled and qualified talents. This triggers a huge number of opportunities for freshers and experienced candidates at all levels.

Hiring for start-ups is not only about sourcing, interviewing candidates, and getting the vacancy filled; it is looking for people who are motivated and enthusiastic about the idea.

What are the challenges a start-up could face while hiring?

  1. Finding natural leaders
  2. Start-ups need the right talent to reach their goals. With a small staff, the impact of hiring a great fit—or a mismatch—is magnified. They cannot afford to make hiring mistakes and lose time and money. Working at a start-up requires hard work and dedication at every step. Finding individuals who are proactive, problem solvers with a willingness to roll up their sleeves and get it done is essential for a start-up business. 
  3. Finding motivated people
  4. Motivation comes before skills in a start-up. Apart from the right skills set for any particular role, it is highly essential to gauge the motivation of the person — where this motivation coming from and what is are the associated expectations, both short and long term.
  5. Cultural Fit
  6. A poor culture fit can bring down the entire venture, while a strong fit can strengthen morale, boost productivity and encourage innovation. The working environment in a start-up is dynamic and fast paced which may not suit applicants from traditional industries. Even candidates with the right skills and experience may not be the right fit. Start-ups cannot afford to spend extra time and efforts to align people with the organisation.
  7. Finding Agile, quick and adjustable people
  8. It could be difficult to find employees who are agile, quick thinking and quickly adjust to a new and changing working style. Professionals who have not worked with starts ups before could find it tough to adjust initially.
  9. Self-Thinkers & Executors
  10. In a start-up you need to think entrepreneurially, take a project and run with it. If you are going to work for an entrepreneur, you better start acting like one. It could be challenging to find people who are mature enough to manage their work independently without much supervision.
  11. Time Shortage 
  12. The time gap between the decisions to hire to actual hiring is short in a start-up. Keeping the position open for too long or hastily hiring the wrong candidate can impact the business negatively. Making the right trade-off between speed and perfection is a constant challenge.
  13. Self-Starting and committed candidates
  14. Since work areas or responsibilities in a small start-up could be hazy, the challenge would be to find a multitasking, self-starting candidate who will be self-driven, motivated and would take up new initiatives and find work for themselves. There are the rare to find high potential candidates who will learn quickly and grow fast in their career.
  15. The right soft skills 
  16. Almost always a start-up measure people on 4 things – attitude (to learn/grow/make things happen fast), existing skill set, maturity and communication skills. IT would surely be a challenge to find candidates with all of these 4 soft skills.
  17. Competition
  18. For starts up looking for employees with rare or specialised skills, getting the right person to join could be difficult as good candidates would also be pursued by other recruiters with competitive pay scales and work environments.
  19. Lack of start-up oriented hiring tools
  20. While there are several recruitment agencies, online job portals and social networking sites, very few are specifically directed towards start-ups. Traditional recruitment solutions like job portals do not provide quality talent and a lot of new companies, which lack a proper recruiting process, are often clueless on how to recruit.


At Select Global Solutions we understand the challenges and needs for hiring for start-ups. Our team is currently working with several start-ups to find top talent with the attitude, skills sets and enthusiasm to take their entrepreneurial vision to the next level. We also understand the different compensation structures that are unique to startups, and are able to explain to prospective candidates what ESOP schemes or other equity/stock option components are.

We are proud to be associated with exciting new ventures around innovative product, service, process or a platform by helping them connect to potential team members who share their vision.

(Source: Indeed, I am wire, Money Control, Entrepreneur)

Related Keyphrases:

find high potential candidates | right soft skills Almost | Finding motivated peopleMotivation | Traditional recruitment solutions | different compensation structures | candidatesSince work areas | several recruitment agencies | prospective candidates | important funding ecosystem | communication skills | proper recruiting process | FitA poor culture fit | right skills | consumer internet space | entrepreneurial vision